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Owens Corning Sustainability Report

BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE 2021 SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction Message from Our CEO and CSO About Owens Corning Owens Corning and the Fight Against Climate Change Our Sustainability Aspirations Summary & Highlights OUR APPROACH Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues UN Sustainable Development Goals Alignment Board Leadership Risk Management Digital Transformation Compliance & Beyond Total Productive Maintenance Tax EXPANDING OUR PRODUCT HANDPRINT Circular Economy Product Innovation & Stewardship Sustainable Growth Supply Chain Sustainability REDUCING OUR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Energy Efficiency & Sourcing Renewable Energy Combating Climate Change Air Quality Management Responsible Water Sourcing & Consumption Waste Management Protecting Biodiversity EXPANDING OUR SOCIAL HANDPRINT Employee Experience Inclusion & Diversity Community Engagement Living Safely Health & Wellness Human Rights & Ethics APPENDICES A. About the Report B. Workforce Data C. Environmental Data D. General Disclosures E. UN Global Compact Communication on Progress F. Assurance Statements G. TCFD Climate Risk & Opportunities H. TCFD Index I. SASB Index J. GRI Index Photo submitted by: Michele Mazza | Trophy Club, Texas, U.S. White Sands National Park, Alamagordo, New Mexico, U.S. 3 4 6 11 13 16 33 34 41 51 57 66 71 78 83 84 85 95 111 122 136 137 146 159 167 178 189 200 201 216 233 246 263 273 286 287 293 306 327 338 345 350 362 364 365

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      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Introduction | 3 BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE Thank you for your interest in Owens Corning and the sustainability efforts that are at the heart of our operations. This is our 16th annual report, and we hope you find it to be a valuable resource in understanding our all-encompassing approach to sustainability. Our theme this year is inspired by Owens Corning’s refreshed mission statement, which was adopted in 2021: Building a sustainable future through material innovation. Throughout this report, we demonstrate how we are working to fulfill that mission, as well as the many ways our people and our products are helping make the world a better place. Our emphasis on a sustainable future is especially appropriate this year, as this is the first report to be completely focused on our 2030 sustainability goals. This ambitious slate of objectives underscores our aspiration to be a net-positive company, one whose positive impacts far outweigh any negative impacts. Our sustainability goals are built on three key pillars: ■ Expanding our product handprint. We endeavor to increase the positive impacts our products have on the world. ■ Reducing our environmental footprint. We seek to limit the negative impact our operations have on the environment. ■ Increasing our social handprint . We work to safeguard people’s safety and help ensure that they live with health, happiness, and human dignity. The report is structured around 16 Sustainability Materiality Topics, which our stakeholders have indicated are most meaningful to them, and we have arranged the topics based on their relevance to these three pillars. We have prepared this report in accordance with the Global Reporting Initiatives (GRI) Comprehensive option. This is the more extensive option for GRI reporting, requiring additional disclosure related to our strategy, ethics and integrity, and governance. This report has been independently verified, including data and descriptions of all the ways our commitment to sustainability manifests itself. The chapters include explanations of our overall approach to each material topic, descriptions of the various initiatives we have in place to achieve our goals, and overviews of our progress to date. Additional supporting data can be found in the appendices at the end of the report, as well as indices reflecting information in response to the GRI standards, the United Nations Global Compacts (UNGC), Advanced- Level Communication on Progress, the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) and the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) reporting requirements. Throughout the report, we also spotlight some of the employees who are helping to drive our efforts in each of our material topics. These Speaking of Sustainability interviews reveal the personal side of our endeavors and underscore the idea that our work in general — and our sustainability goals in particular — are global in scope and human in scale. Owens Corning is building a more sustainable future on a solid foundation, one that is based on years of successful innovation and dedication to our goals. As we continue to make progress on a new slate of goals — our most ambitious to date — we hope you will be inspired to join us on our sustainability journey. Photo submitted by: Yana Liu | Shanghai, China A view of Century Park, Shanghai.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Message from our CEO and CSO | 4 A MESSAGE FROM OUR CEO AND CSO The foundation for our sustainability aspirations and our growth strategy is our mission — to build a sustainable future through material innovation. In 2021, our people thrived while persevering through continuing challenges and crises around the world that are changing social, political, and economic landscapes everywhere. We are extremely proud of our global Owens Corning team for their resolve and resiliency, which has enabled enduring sustainability progress in another demanding year. As we communicate each year, our aspiration is to be a net-positive company. In the pages of this document, our 16th annual sustainability reports, it’s our privilege to provide some highlights of our goals and approach, the progress we’ve made to date, and our work ahead. This 2021 report covers our efforts to double our products’ handprint and halve our environmental footprint, while concurrently working to eliminate injuries and lifestyle-induced diseases, advance inclusion and diversity, and collaborate to make a positive difference in the communities where we work and live. We began our sustainability journey nearly two decades ago, and along the way our goals have evolved, guided by the best available science. With the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change affirming the need for urgent action, our science-based targets continue to inform our strategies and tactics from today to next week, next month, next year, and to 2030 and beyond. Like many companies around the world, Owens Corning faced headwinds in 2021. The continuing pandemic, supply chain disruption, inflation, and other headline-gr abbing events and influences all required innovation and adaptability for our business to succeed. At the same time, many of our manufacturing facilities were running at full capacity to continue to serve our customers. In 2021, as in any business environment, our 2030 sustainability goals helped us stay focused on the future while we navigated the present. We have established roadmaps to help our teams understand what’s needed to meet our environmental footprint reduction goals. These roadmaps guide our short-, mid-, and long-term strategies, and help ensure that sustainability remains our priority as we innovate to serve our customers while addressing both the challenges and the opportunities within the relevant secular trends. Among the trends that affect our markets, we see growth opportunities for Owens Corning in the increased premium of living spaces; changing construction practices due to labor shortages; demand for sustainable solutions for decarbonization and circularity; and investment in durable infrastructure. In fact, approximately 60% of our revenue comes from our portfolio of products that save energy or reduce emissions. These products have a role in energy efficiency improvements, housing renovation and construction, and increased renewable energy penetration — so the more we reduce our environmental footprint, the faster we achieve our net-positive aspiration. This dynamic drives our 2030 goal to cut our GHG emissions in half; this target has been verified by the Science Based Target initiative to be in line with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s pathway to limit global warming to 1.5° Celsius maximum above pre-industrial levels. Concurrently, we have a science-based target of 30% reduction across our Scope 3 emissions that is also verified by SBTi. Photo submitted by: Kristin Bell | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Rocky Mountain State Park, Colorado, U.S.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Message from our CEO and CSO | 5 To achieve these goals, our roadmap for progress in climate change includes raw materials and processes with lower greenhouse gas emissions; increased recycled content/circularity; energy and process efficiency improvements; more renewable energy use; and fuel switching from on-site fossil fuel use to low- or no-carbon solutions. Long-term, we’ll be working to develop and implement last-mile solutions for operational emissions through innovation and exploration of still-emerging renewable fuel technologies. In 2021, we completed two power purchase agreements that add to our existing renewable electricity commitments. Sourcing 100% renewable electricity, another goal for 2030, is an important step toward our ambition to fully decarbonize. At the same time, we’re improving the efficiency of our operations to reduce energy use and working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions throughout the value chain of our products. Lowering the embodied carbon of our products further shortens the time it takes for them to save more GHG emissions in-use than are emitted to manufacture them. This is an example of the way trends, goals, and roadmaps for sustainability inform our business. Beyond environmental footprint reduction “within” our plants, we are working to refine our understanding and set measurable goals for our impact on biodiversity and the circular economy, as well as continually seeking better ways to measure our progress on social impact priorities like inclusion and diversity. In this report, you’ll find examples, data, and perspectives that represent our results and our plans. We are proud to have received external recognition for our sustainability commitments and results — including being the first company ever to earn the No. 1 spot on the 100 Corporate Best Citizens list from 3BL Media for three years in a row. In 2021, we were named to the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index for the 12th consecutive year, and we are also listed on the DJSI North America Index, with industry-leading assessment scores. Inclusion on these lists indicates that our overall approach to environment, social, and governance aspects of our business is aligned with stakeholder expectations. Other awards, such as our 17th consecutive perfect score for LGBTQ workplace equality on the Human Rights Campaign Foundation’s Corporate Equality Index, and our placement on CDP’s Water Security A List, help us gauge our progress on specific topics. Such accolades are an honor and acknowledge the work we’ve done, but they also spur us to do more. Our network of stakeholders has expanded rapidly in recent years, and we know that more people than ever are curious about our goals and interested in our results. Not long ago, ESG-labeled funds held 9% of our shares; today, that is 14%. As we grow, we also can have a larger effect on the communities and lives we touch. The progress we’ve made so far reflects our purpose: our people and products make the world a better place. Our 2021 results, detailed in this report, speak to the dedication and commitment of our people, and give us reason for optimism despite the challenges ahead. Sharing our results and aspirations is an important part of our commitment to all our stakeholders, and we are grateful for the many people who have inspired our work and pushed us to continually do more. Brian Chambers Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Frank O'Brien-Bernini Senior Vice President and Chief Sustainability Officer

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | About Owens Corning | 6 ABOUT OWENS CORNING Owens Corning is a global building and construction materials leader committed to building a sustainable future through material innovation. Our three integrated businesses – Composites, Insulation, and Roofing – provide durable, sustainable, energy-efficient solutions that leverage our unique material science, manufacturing, and market knowledge to help our customers win and grow. Photo submitted by: Julie Pope | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Owens Corning world headquarters. OUR MISSION To build a sustainable future through material innovation. OUR PURPOSE Our people and products make the world a better place. OUR VALUES Global in scope, human in scale. Caring: • We keep each other safe and healthy. • We offer an inclusive environment where diverse perspectives are valued and appreciated. • We actively support our communities and protect our environment. Curious: • We challenge the status quo for greater impact and innovation. • We listen and learn from one another’s different skill sets and experiences. • We relentlessly pursue solutions that exceed customer expectations. Collaborative: • We work together in an open, transparent and respectful way. • We foster highly connected teams across the global enterprise. • We partner with our customers and other stakeholders to drive the best outcomes. Committed: • We are accountable to deliver financial and operational results that outperform the market. • We empower our people to make decisions and act like owners. • We remain resilient to achieve our goals and best serve our purpose. THE OWENS CORNING STORY

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | About Owens Corning | 7 Insulation Insulation products conserve energy while improving acoustics and fire resistance in the places where we work, live, and play. Our Insulation segment includes a diverse portfolio of high-, mid-, and low- temperature products; a market mix of residential, commercial, industrial, and other markets; and a channel mix of retail, contractor, and distribution. Our products in the residential channel — sold under well-recognized such well-known brand names and trademarks as Owens Corning ® PINK ® Fiberglas™ Insulation — include thermal and acoustical batts, loosefill insulation, and foam sheathing and accessories. In the commercial and industrial channel, our products are sold under well-recognized brand names and trademarks such as Thermafiber ® , FOAMGLAS ® , and PAROC ® insulation. They include glass fiber pipe insulation, energy efficient flexible duct media, bonded and granulated mineral wool insulation, cellular glass insulation and foam insulation used in above- and below- grade construction applications. We sell our insulation products primarily to insulation installers, home centers, lumberyards, retailers, and distributors in the U.S., Canada, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Latin America. Roofing Roofing products and systems protect and preserve homes and commercial buildings while enhancing curb appeal. Our primary products in the Roofing segment are laminate and strip asphalt roofing shingles. Other products in this segment include roofing components, synthetic packaging materials, and oxidized asphalt. Owens Corning ® shingles and roofing components are sold mainly through distributors, home centers, lumberyards, retailers, and contractors in the U.S., while our synthetic packaging materials are mainly used in the construction industry for lumber and metal packaging. Oxidized asphalt is a significant input used in the production of our roofing shingles. We are vertically integrated and have manufacturing facilities that process asphalt for use in our roofing shingle manufacturing. In addition, we sell processed asphalt to other shingle manufacturers, to roofing contractors for built-up roofing asphalt systems, and to manufacturers in other industries such as automotive, chemical, rubber, and construction. Composites Composite materials make products lighter, so less energy is needed to transport and operate them. They also help make products stronger and more durable, which reduces the need to repair or replace them. Our Composites business facilitates the manufacturing of a wide range of glass fiber and downstream products such as fabrics, nonwovens, and other specialized products. Composites are used in more than 40,000 end-use applications. We serve a range of market segments: building and construction, power and energy, industrial, and consumer products. Examples of end-use applications include pipe, roofing shingles, ladders, sporting goods, telecommunications cables, boat hulls, RV side panels, and wind energy blades. Owens Corning products are designed and engineered to provide a material difference for our customers and ultimately make the world a better place. Photos: Owens Corning ® products: PINK ® Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ Insulation (left) ProEdge ® Hip & Ridge Shingle (center) Fiberglas™ Rebar (right)

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | About Owens Corning | 8 2021 Revenue by Segment 2021 Revenue by Region  Composites 27%  Insulation 36%  Roofing 37%  United States 67%  Europe 16%  Asia Pacific 9%  Canada and Other 8% We aim to capitalize on our market-leading positions and innovative technologies to deliver substantial free cash flow and sustainable shareholder value. The business is global in scope, with operations in 33 countries, and human in scale, with approximately 20,000 employees and long-standing, local relationships with its customers and communities. Based in Toledo, Ohio, U.S., Owens Corning posted 2021 net sales of $8.5 billion. It has been a Fortune 500 ® company for 67 consecutive years. Owens Corning is a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange. As of December 31, 2021, beneficial ownership includes: Blackrock, Inc. (11.5%) and The Vanguard Group (9.73%). Read more about our businesses in the Owens Corning Annual Report on Form 10-K, available at http://investor.owenscorning.com . Owens Corning has manufacturing and research and development facilities around the world. Our world headquarters are located at One Owens Corning Parkway, Toledo, Ohio, 43659, U.S.  Chin a  In dia  Sing ap ore  So uth Ko rea  Czech Re public   Finland France   It aly  Li thua nia Be lgi um   Po land  Ru ssia Sp ain  Swe den  Un ited Kingdom   Brazil  Ca nada Mexico   Un ited States Ne therla nds  Germ an y

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | About Owens Corning | 9 Best Corporate Citizens List For an unprecedented third year in a row, Owens Corning was ranked number one on 3BL Media’s list of the 100 Best Corporate Citizens. The list, previously published by Corporate Responsibility Magazine, recognizes outstanding global ESG (environmental, social, and governance) performance among the 1,000 largest U.S.- based public companies. This is the seventh year Owens Corning has been named to the list. The companies are ranked based on a blend of performance and disclosure. CDP Owens Corning earned a place on the CDP A List for Water Security for the third year in a row. The company also scored an A- for CDP Climate Change in 2021, which represents the sixth consecutive year of earning a score at the Leadership Level. Formerly known as Carbon Disclosure Project, the U.K.-based CDP works with investors, companies, and policymakers to reduce GHG emissions and safeguard water resources and forests. By including Owens Corning on these lists, CDP recognizes us for our corporate sustainability leadership, through scoring that “measures comprehensiveness of disclosure, awareness, and management of environmental risks, and best practices associated with environmental leadership, such as setting ambitious and meaningful targets.” Responsible CEO of the Year from 3BL Media CEO Brian Chambers was named 2021 Responsible CEO of the Year for ESG Transparency. The award recognizes chief executives with proven records of bold and innovative leadership on environmental, social and governance (ESG) commitments. Computerworld’s 2021 Best Places to Work in IT In 2021, Owens Corning returned to the No. 1 spot on Computerworld’s ranking of the best places to work in information technology. The ranking is based on such factors as benefits, diversity, career development, training, retention, and the results of an employee survey. This is the eighth consecutive year that Owens Corning has appeared on this list. In 2020, Owens Corning ranked No. 2 on the list, and was No. 1 in 2019. Corporate Equality Index Owens Corning received a perfect score on the 2021 Corporate Equality Index, a key benchmarking survey that evaluates corporate policies and practices related to LGBTQ workplace equality. This marks the 17th consecutive year we have received 100% on this survey, established by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation. DiversityInc 2021 Companies for Diversity Owens Corning was named a 2021 Noteworthy Company by DiversityInc, an organization that annually ranks U.S. companies for diversity, equity, and inclusion, for the second consecutive year. The rankings measure performance based on six key areas of diversity and inclusion management: human capital diversity metrics, leadership accountability, talent programs, workplace practices, supplier diversity, and philanthropy. Dow Jones Sustainability Indices In 2021, for the 12th year in a row, Owens Corning earned placement in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index in recognition of its sustainability initiatives. The DJSI World Index is an elite listing of the world’s largest companies based on long-term economic, environmental, and social criteria. Our score places us in the 100th percentile for the building products industry. In addition, we earned a perfect score for the criteria related to materiality, environmental reporting, and social reporting. The company is also on the DJSI North America list for the 4th consecutive year. EcoVadis Owens Corning earned a Platinum certificate with EcoVadis, a company that provides holistic sustainability ratings for businesses worldwide. The rating comes after analyzing our responses to an extensive questionnaire in comparison with over 65,000 other companies. Owens Corning was ranked among the top 1% of all companies rated by EcoVadis. CORPORATE AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS Owens Corning continues to be a leader in corporate responsibility, and we are very proud of the recognition we receive along the way. It also provides inspiration for our people as we seek out new ways to build a more sustainable company. The following are some of the awards and distinctions we received throughout 2021. A LIST 2021 WA TER

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | About Owens Corning | 10 ENERGY STAR Owens Corning’s world headquarters in Toledo, Ohio, U.S., earned the Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR rating for 2021. Ethisphere Institute: World’s Most Ethical Companies For the fourth consecutive year, the Ethisphere Institute, a global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, has recognized Owens Corning as one of the world’s most ethical companies. Owens Corning is one of two businesses in the construction and building materials industry to earn this distinction. The Ethisphere Institute honors companies that demonstrate a commitment to improving communities, building capable and empowered workforces, and fostering corporate cultures that are focused on ethics and a strong sense of purpose. In 2021, the Ethisphere Institute honored 135 companies from 22 countries and 47 industries. Fortune 500 ® As of 2021, Owens Corning has been recognized as a Fortune 500 ® company for 67 consecutive years. This year, Owens Corning moved up 18 places on the list to No. 413. Global Knights 100 Most Sustainable Corporations In 2021, Owens Corning earned the top spot for the Building Materials Industry Group, and we were ranked 15th overall. The ranking is based on publicly disclosed data spanning 24 key performance indicators for corporate ESG results. Based on the same data, the company also earned a place on the 2021 Clean200 list (published by Corporate Knights in partnership with As You Sow), which recognizes the world’s most significant publicly traded firms according to the size of clean revenue from products and services that provide solutions for the planet and define the future of clean energy. S&P Global Gold Class Distinction Owens Corning earned Gold Class distinction from S&P Global, the organization’s highest honor for excellence in sustainability performance, for the eighth consecutive year. Owens Corning was the sole Gold Class awardee in the Building Products category. S&P Global is a leading provider of credit ratings, benchmarks and analytics in the global capital and commodity markets. The S&P Sustainability Yearbook looks at performance across such factors as volunteerism, energy and emissions reduction, production efficiency, customer and supplier collaboration, and talent development. Green Power Partnership – National Top 100 In 2021, Owens Corning debuted at No.16 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) National Top 100 List of the largest green power users from the Green Power Partnership. The company was also No. 11 on the list of Green Power Partners from the Fortune 500 ® . ISS QualityScore Institutional Shareholder Services (ISS) awards QualityScore ratings based on a range of criteria related to environmental, social, and governance performance. A lower score, on a scale from one to ten, indicates lower risk and/or better disclosure on the part of the company. In 2021, Owens Corning’s ISS QualityScore ratings were 1 in environmental, 1 in social, and 2 in governance. JUST Capital Owens Corning was ranked Industry Leader for Building Materials and Packaging for 2021. We were also No. 69 in the Just 100. Companies are rated based on their performance across a range of categories, including the treatment of employees and customers, product quality, sustainability, jobs, and community support, as well as company leadership. Science Based Targets Initiative Our 2030 goal to reduce Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 50% is in line with standards set to hold global warming to 1.5° Celsius. The Science Based Targets initiative, which set these standards, has approved our goal. In addition, Owens Corning’s commitment to reducing Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions by 30% by 2030 has been approved by the Science Based Targets initiative. WSJ Management Top 250 Owens Corning ranked No. 54 in 2021, up from No. 99 in 2020 and No. 188 in 2019. This ranking, developed by the Drucker Institute, measures corporate effectiveness by examining performance in five areas: customer satisfaction, employee engagement and development, innovation, social responsibility, and financial strength. The ranking is based on an analysis of 34 data inputs provided by 14 third-party sources.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | The Fight Against Climate Change | 11 Having been part of Owens Corning’s sustainability journey for over 20 years, I have seen firsthand the incredible progress that we, and other dedicated companies, have made toward building a better future. While we, as corporations and as a society, have made great gains in reducing our environmental impact, our collective actions are not achieving the magnitude, scale, and urgency needed. Severe weather phenomena, from droughts and wildfires to storms and floods, are occurring with greater frequency and greater severity than ever before. Global climate change, linked to human behavior, is now a scientifically recognized driver of these localized weather events. To help stem the devastation that is occurring as a result, the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has issued recommendations aimed at limiting warming to 1.5° C. Their latest reports have made clear the need to act decisively: The planet’s air, oceans, and ice are pushing relentlessly into new territory. Unless there are immediate, rapid, and large-scale reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, limiting warming to 1.5° C will be beyond reach. Consistent with this call to action, Owens Corning is committed to a decarbonized future. Our 2030 goal for reducing Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 50% has been approved by the Science- Based Targets initiative (SBTi) as being in alignment with the IPCC’s 1.5° C maximum global warming pathway. Concurrently, our Scope 3 greenhouse gas reduction goal of 30% has been approved by the SBTi as being in alignment with the IPCC’s well below 2.0° C pathway. Our definition of total value chain decarbonization is also consistent with the new SBTi guidance. More information about our work on this front can be found in the Combating Climate Change chapter in this report. OWENS CORNING AND THE FIGHT AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE THOUGHTS FROM CSO FRANK O’BRIEN-BERNINI

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | The Fight Against Climate Change | 12 The importance of embracing these standards has never been more urgent. While certainly the talk of climate scientists for years, the IPCC process was the first time the scientific community has established a clear connection between these localized weather events and human- driven climate change. The higher temperatures associated with climate change have intensified the water cycle, leading to warmer oceans, heavier rainfalls, and increased flooding, as well as higher sea levels along coastal areas. In addition, hotter climates are linked to droughts and fires in other parts of the world. As more studies link catastrophic weather events to the emission of greenhouse gases, they serve to confirm what many people have long understood: While weather and climate are in many ways two separate concepts, they are clearly tied together, and changes in the climate have very real consequences in our everyday lives. It has also underscored the need for everyone — corporations and individuals alike — to take action to limit our impact on our global climate. Scientists often seek to maintain optimism about the extent to which mitigating climate change is possible. However, there is good reason to believe that we are destined to live in a world that has been significantly touched by climate change, with higher temperatures and more extreme weather conditions. Because we will be affected by the impact of these changes for countless generations to come, we must elevate our focus on adaptation and carbon removal, even as we continue to work diligently to mitigate our greenhouse gas emissions. Our commitment to decarbonization is evident throughout this report, as is our dedication to the new materials and material system opportunities available to us as we work to both mitigate and adapt to the impacts of climate change. This report is full of incredible photos spotlighting the beauty of the natural world. As readers browse the report, we hope they will recognize how fragile these landscapes are, and the potential damage that even small increases in temperature might have on them. Images like these serve as an acute reminder of exactly what is at stake as we work to build a more sustainable future. Photo submitted by: Tim Clancy | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. View from a cabin in Northern Michigan.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Our Sustainability Aspirations | 13 OUR SUSTAINABILITY ASPIRATIONS Owens Corning has established itself as a global leader in corporate citizenship, and over the years our efforts have been rewarded with some very prestigious accolades. While that recognition has been gratifying, the true driver behind our sustainability efforts has been an understanding that our planet simply cannot continue to sustain life (as we know it) if we remain on the path we are on. Resources are diminishing, temperatures are rising, and people everywhere are feeling the impact. All of this is reflected in the sustainability aspirations we have set for ourselves as a company. They are ambitious by design, because we believe true sustainability is based not on what is easy for us to accomplish, but on what the science tells us is needed to preserve our planet. In addition, our sustainability journey has consistently reminded us that as we achieve more, we realize how much more can be done. Every accomplishment points us toward new opportunities to fulfill our ultimate ambition — ensuring that our people and our products make the world a better place. Photo submitted by: Yana Liu | Shanghai, China Sun-drying Chinese torreya, a special local product, near our Guangde plant. 2030 GUIDING ASPIRATIONS Have a POSITIVE IMPACT on our communities ADVANCE our inclusion and diversity Eliminate injuries and IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE for our employees and their families HALVE THE NEGATIVE IMPACT of our operations These are the principles that will inform our actions as we work toward our goals. They represent our understanding of the ways Owens Corning’s work can benefit individuals, communities, and the planet — and how valuing one requires that we value all three. By 2030, we expect the world will be a very different place. Increasing demands on the earth’s resources will continue to create challenges. By taking the stance we are taking today — leading the way with an ambitious, holistic approach to sustainability — Owens Corning believes we can help make the world of 2030 a better place. DOUBLE the positive impact of our products

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Our Sustainability Aspirations | 14 Data-Driven Solutions for Sustainability Each step on our sustainability journey is measured against a set of quantifiable metrics and specific targets. As our journey has progressed, we have worked to develop data-driven methods that provide quantifiable measures of our improvement. The following examples demonstrate this commitment across all three of our key pillars: Expanding Our Product Handprint: ■ Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs) enable us to comprehensively measure a product’s footprint through all its stages, from the extraction of raw materials, through transportation, processing and manufacturing, to its end of life disposition. By performing LCAs, we can identify opportunities for improvement and work collaboratively with suppliers and customers to ensure we are making continuous progress toward doubling the positive impact of our products. Reducing Our Environmental Footprint: ■ In our 2030 goals, we seek to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions from our operations by half, in line with what’s needed to limit global warming to 1.5° C. Our target has been validated and approved by the Science Based Targets initiative. ■ To understand how water stress is affecting an area, we refer to the Aqueduct Water Risk Atlas, a resource developed by the World Resources Institute (WRI). With this global water risk mapping tool, we screen our sites for high baseline water supply stress and see projections for the levels of stress these sites may be under in years to come. Understanding the areas where water is limited in quantity or quality is essential to our water goals, and this tool provides us with the insights needed to achieve them. ■ As we work toward the establishment of our biodiversity goals, we use the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT), a web-based mapping and reporting instrument. IBAT enables us to upload site coordinates and receive information about the area’s status as a protected site and the presence of endangered or threatened species in the vicinity. When our goals are established in 2025, the IBAT will continue to guide our biodiversity efforts. ■ The Ecodesign Strategy Wheel is a brainstorming tool that empowers product designers to integrate the principles of sustainability into the development of new products and the significant modification of existing products. More sustainable product design can help us contribute to the circular economy, as well as meet the goals we have set for both waste management and air quality management. Increasing Our Social Handprint: ■ Our health and wellness initiatives are increasingly guided by our use of the Healthy Living platform, which employs an algorithm that considers illnesses, medication usage, demographics, and other factors to calculate health risks for our employees and empowers them to make better choices. ■ Historical data, current data, and key performance indicators provide our safety teams with the insights needed to track performance, identify trends, and tap into real-time metrics. We also continue to use safety dashboards and databases to further our efforts in that area. Learn more about Owens Corning’s sustainability goals and targets in the Summary & Highlights of this report. A Holistic Approach to Sustainability We believe that sustainability efforts should improve people’s quality of life. That view informs our aspirations to contribute to the health, safety, and well-being of people — and all living things — everywhere. It’s our goal to be a net-positive company, one whose handprint is greater than our footprint. In other words, we aim to continually increase the good that our people and products do while also reducing the negative environmental impact of our operations. These aspirations are closely connected. For example, when we design insulation products that help save energy, that’s part of our handprint, as those products help our customers and end-users meet their sustainability goals. When we design those same products with higher recycled content, or to be easy to recycle or repurpose as part of the circular economy, that expands our handprint further. And when we design our manufacturing processes to use less energy or other natural resources, we reduce our footprint. Over time, our definition of sustainability has also come to include expanding our social handprint, and so we work to help ensure that people can live with health, happiness, and human dignity. Our safety commitments are one pillar of this, as we aspire to eliminate all injuries, at work and at home. Our health and wellness programs aim to help our employees and their families thrive while eliminating all lifestyle-induced disease. In our workplaces and our communities, we seek to foster a spirit of inclusion and create a culture of appreciation. We want to see a society where people feel valued not despite their differences, but because of them. Above all, we understand that achieving these ambitions will depend on the actions we take today.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Our Sustainability Aspirations | 15 Top Areas of Focus The work we’re doing toward our 2030 sustainability goals is described in more detail in the chapters of this report. There are several key areas of work that will support the goals. In some cases, multiple goals will be affected by one focus area. Accountability for progress on these critical priorities rests with our top business executives, ensuring broad engagement across the company in our sustainability work. These 11 areas represent a wide range of projects, initiatives, and opportunities for Owens Corning — our progress toward these priorities is chronicled in this report. Blowing agent. Solve the technical, business, and commercial puzzles in both our global foam insulation operations and our products to eliminate blowing agents that have high global warming potential. Renewable energy sourcing. Further reduce demand through energy efficiency and concurrently expand our renewable energy investments and purchases globally, establishing programs in China, India, Mexico, Brazil, Europe, and Canada to reduce the footprint of both our operations and our products. Fuel switching. Develop affordable technology to enable conversion from fossil fuel to carbon-neutral and renewable energy to power our processes. Expand our offering of formaldehyde-free insulation products . Convert to formaldehyde-free binders for global production of our technical insulation and mineral wool products. Embodied carbon. Reduce the amount of carbon released throughout the entire life cycle of our products by making our manufacturing processes more energy-efficient, improving our supply chain logistics, increasing recycled content, innovating low/ no/positive carbon products, and developing end-of-life solutions. Recycling into our processes. Increase the amount of recycled materials and production waste we use in our products and processes, tapping into waste- streams throughout our entire value chain, while eliminating waste-to-landfill. Safety. Advance in our journey to zero injuries by understanding, learning, innovating, and executing the right safety-related leadership, processes, and investments. Circular economy. Develop business models and technical solutions to recycle Owens Corning ® roofing, composites, and insulation products to advance the circular economy, reduce waste-to-landfill, and enable us to take back scrap material from our customers’ processes. Healthy living innovation. Develop strategies and tactics to inspire and engage all U.S. employees who are not yet enrolled in our wellness initiatives, and expand the participation of our employees outside the U.S. Inclusion and diversity. Identify and close gaps, measure progress, enable success with business impact, and evolve our leadership voice, while fostering a culture where our individual differences are truly appreciated. Supplier sustainability. Inspire our suppliers to engage with us around sustainability priorities while increasing transparency, such as reducing our Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions and ensuring certainty of compliance with our human rights policy.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 16 2021 IN REVIEW SUMMARY & HIGHLIGHTS Owens Corning is making great progress toward our 2030 goals — and toward our mission of building a more sustainable future. Photo submitted by: Scott Campen | Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S. Coconino National Forest, Arizona, U.S. INTRODUCTION Having closed the books on our 2020 sustainability goals, we are now looking ahead to the next decade with great optimism. Our slate of 2030 sustainability goals are our most ambitious to date, because we recognize that every past achievement is a platform upon which to build. In 2021, we saw encouraging advancements across all three of our sustainability pillars, giving us reason to believe that we are on the right track toward our aspirations. Each of the topics discussed here has a corresponding chapter in this report, offering a closer look at our progress against our goals, as well as the drivers that inform our approach, the initiatives we’re taking throughout our operations, and the progress we’ve already made. The following is a brief look at some recent highlights.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 17 Our Circular Economy Goal By 2030, we will establish viable circular economy business models involving our materials and how they are used. We can accomplish this by: ■ Increasing recycled content and decreasing virgin raw materials used in our products. ■ Developing technical solutions and practical business models for our product materials and packaging, so they can be used for beneficial purposes even after they are no longer used for the original purpose. ■ Collaborating up and down the supply chain, with customers, suppliers, communities, academics, policy makers, government entities, and other organizations. Our circular economy efforts are focused in two areas: ■ Manufacturing This work focuses on meeting our 2030 waste management goals — reducing the intensity of waste generated by our processes by 50%, and then finding ways to reuse or recycle the rest — as well as our efforts to expand the use of recycled materials in our manufacturing operations and our products, across all businesses. ■ End-of-life solutions We are seeking innovative technologies and business models for our products and materials to be reused and repurposed indefinitely. This work includes internal partnerships among R&D, commercial, and corporate development to shape the vision and execution in this area. We also engage with external partners to develop end-of-life solutions for our products, as well as the products where our materials are used. EXPANDING OUR PRODUCT HANDPRINT Owens Corning works to ensure our products have a positive impact on the world. We believe that by innovating in ways that benefit the planet, we can also help our customers — and strengthen our own business. It’s a principle that requires us to act intentionally, and it informs everything we do as a company. Our most recent initiatives toward establishing circular economy models include the following: ■ The circular economy team , established in 2020, defines goals and prioritizes projects that accelerate our circular economy ambitions. The team also partners with subject matter experts and teams across our company, as well as other stakeholders in the industry. ■ Take-back models encourage manufacturers to accept responsibility for downstream waste from customers using their products. For Owens Corning, this can include waste generated during construction, subsequent fabrication, installation, or protective packaging. Owens Corning Paroc has established take-back models in Sweden and Finland, as well as in our metals packaging products. ■ Shingle recycling efforts are in place, as our Specialty Asphalt paving business is working with state departments of transportation, roofing contractors, and other stakeholders to create a circular economy model for roofing shingles. ■ Owens Corning is a partner in the ZEBRA (Zero WastE Blade ReseArch) project in Europe, a cross-sector consortium launched in 2020 to develop the first 100% recyclable wind turbine blade. Photo submitted by: Houston Plant | Houston, Texas, U.S. Rodney Ivy (left) and Margarito Barreto at the Houston plant.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 18 Photos: PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ (left) WindStrand ® (center) Trumbull ® Asphalt (right) Product Innovation & Stewardship By 2030, we intend to offer the most recognized and preferred products for sustainability. ■ To meet this ambitious goal, we are striving to implement strategies that deliver the lowest impact with respect to embodied carbon among all available options. ■ We will design our products for recycling or reuse at their end of life while using Life Cycle Assessments as our guide. We will ensure our products contain a high percentage of recycled and renewable materials. In addition, we will collaborate with our suppliers to increase transparency regarding the raw materials we use in our products. This helps us understand and control the full impact of our products — and enables us to share that information with our customers so they can do the same. ■ Product innovation is essential to all three of our core businesses — Composites, Insulation, and Roofing — as we develop new products and applications across a growing range of key market segments. This innovation is inspired by the needs of our customers and addresses growing global trends. By collaborating closely with stakeholders, we can deliver sustainable solutions that meet the demands of the marketplace. ■ Product stewardship is a driving force behind our approach to innovation. As we develop new products or improve existing products, everyone involved understands that they share the responsibility for reducing those products’ environmental footprint and increasing its product handprint. At every point in a product’s life cycle, we must consider its potential environmental impact — and demonstrate transparency regarding the sustainability of our products. To mitigate that impact, we work to ensure our products are sustainably made, using our stringent stewardship process to evaluate 100% of our new and significantly modified products for EHS impacts and our gated innovation process to evaluate potential life cycle impacts. Recent innovations in our portfolio include the following: ■ PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation , launched in 2021, offers the highest recycled content in the industry, and it is certified made with 100% renewable electricity through the use of power purchase agreements. In addition, it has earned Underwriter Laboratories GREENGUARD ® Gold certification for low volatile organic compounds. ■ PAROC ® Natura insulation is a carbon-neutral line of stone wool insulation that uses low-carbon melting technology, green electricity, recycled waste materials, new technologies, and purchased carbon offsets to minimize the amount of CO 2 e emitted during the manufacturing process. ■ FOAMULAR ® NGX™ insulation, introduced in 2020, features a proprietary blowing agent that is optimized to demonstrate greater than 80% reduction in embodied carbon, compared to legacy FOAMULAR ® insulation products. The product meets and exceeds stringent regulations going into effect in 2021. ■ WindStrand ® allows wind blade manufacturers to use 30% fewer layers of material in the blade molds, while delivering the same quality and performance as standard fabrics. This in turn represents a 50% savings in labor and production time for the blades. In March 2021, we introduced WindStrand ® 4000, as well as Ultrablade ® 2 and Ultraspar™ 2, three high-performance materials that help wind blade manufacturers develop longer, stiffer, stronger blades, which helps make wind energy more cost-effective. ■ Trumbull ® Asphalt has made significant strides over the last five years to reduce the number of oxidized products we produce for external asphalt markets. In 2015, 8% of our products were non-oxidized. Today, approximately 50% of the products we produce for the external asphalt business are non-oxidized, requiring less energy, lower temperatures, and fewer emissions. This has resulted in a 3% improvement in material efficiency across the 12 asphalt plants in the network.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 19 Sustainable Growth By 2030, we will design our products for recycling or reuse to optimize the impact of our products over their entire life cycle, from raw materials to disposal. Over the next nine years, Owens Corning expects that the importance of balancing growth with sustainability will become increasingly evident. We will be there to meet the demand for products that deliver performance while minimizing negative impacts. In particular, we recognize the growing demand for reduced embodied carbon, which is already shaping our approach to innovation throughout our operations. Among the other specific areas of focus Owens Corning has prioritized for the immediate future is the need to expand the number of products that are free of formaldehyde and fluorocarbons. One way Owens Corning gauges our performance toward our sustainable growth goals is the extent to which we are addressing the trends that are shaping our industry. As we look to the future, we are also cognizant of these trends as significant opportunities to grow while at the same time meeting our 2030 sustainability goals. Currently, we see four primary trends that represent opportunities for sustainable growth over the next decade. ■ Increased premium on living spaces. The global pandemic has changed how we think about our homes, both in terms of functionality and comfort. This new emphasis on living spaces will continue to drive investments in new residential housing and renovation in the U.S. and abroad. Insulation is one of the best ways to improve energy efficiency and indoor comfort, including sound reduction. ■ Changing construction practices. Even before the pandemic, we saw how labor shortages were impacting construction practices and cycles. Since early 2020, the trend has accelerated, creating the need for multi-material and prefabricated construction solutions that can drive efficiencies. Owens Corning PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ enables 23% faster installation. Fiberglas™ rebar, which is seven times lighter than steel, improves ease of handling for 50% faster installation. ■ Demand for sustainable solutions. Reduction of greenhouse gases, improvements in energy efficiency, and the development of more renewable energy sources are increasingly prioritized by homeowners. Governments at all levels are also requiring increasingly stringent standards. Both factors are driving specifications throughout the industry. For example, the European Green Deal Commission proposed that by 2030, all new buildings in the European Union be zero-emission, and Owens Corning products could be part of meeting that goal. ■ Investment in infrastructure. We expect to see upgrades to roads and bridges to continue around the world over the next decade. We also expect that this investment will prioritize more durable solutions, which will help ensure that investments will be more sustainable over time. We will capitalize on these opportunities by focusing on our unique combination of material science knowledge, commercial strength, and manufacturing expertise to develop and commercialize additional product and system solutions. Photo submitted by: Michele Mazza | Trophy Club, Texas, U.S. Little Rock, Arkansas, U.S.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 20 Supply Chain Sustainability By 2030, 100% of our suppliers will meet our Supplier Code of Conduct requirements, with special attention to human rights issues such as safety and forced labor. We will continue to prioritize supply chain partners that share our commitment to sustainability in all its forms. In line with the Supplier Code of Conduct, in 2021, 100% of new suppliers were evaluated for a range of criteria, including environmental and social factors (e.g., human rights and labor practices). In 2021, Owens Corning enhanced our approach to prioritizing suppliers, empowering us to further emphasize the importance of sustainability throughout our value chain. This approach provides additional consideration of our suppliers’ environmental, social, and governance (ESG) risk exposures. The environmental, social, and governance risk scoring framework is based on S&P Global Rating’s ESG Risk Atlas. A sector risk score, which encompasses associated environmental and social risk rationales, is assigned based on the supplier’s commodity. A regional risk score, which embodies governance rationales, is assigned to a supplier’s country. The overall ESG Risk Score is then tallied for each supplier by adding the 3 E, S, and G risk scores. For suppliers who provide multiple commodities to Owens Corning, and therefore potentially have multiple ESG risk scores, we selected the highest ESG risk score to conservatively represent these suppliers. Photo submitted by: Felicia Feng | Yantai, China FOAMGLAS ® insulation ready to be shipped. 100% of team trained or recertified. 2021 2020 2019 100% 100% 2018 100% Supplier Code of Conduct Compliance GOAL: 100% 98% 2021 95% 2019 96% 2020 201 8 BASE YEAR 95% In addition, 100% of our global sourcing team will be trained and recertified annually on sustainability. A standardized process has been implemented across global sourcing and will be used in category strategies going forward.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 21 Energy Efficiency & Sourcing Renewable Energy By 2030, we will be sourcing 100% renewable electricity. Purchasing electricity only from renewable sources is a key part of our effort to halve our greenhouse gas emissions. We’ll also work to reduce the emissions from our processes and improve energy efficiency. We will also reduce energy use by 20% over our baseline year. Over our goal cycle, we will work to reduce energy use from both renewable and non-renewable electricity, as well as other forms of non-renewable energy by 20% from our baseline year of 2018. These two approaches — along with fuel switching and low-carbon or no-carbon fuels and technologies — will put us on the path to eventually eliminating our use of fossil fuels. REDUCING OUR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Throughout our operations, Owens Corning is working to conserve energy, reduce emissions, cut waste, and use water responsibly. Through these efforts — which will require a great deal of dedication and collaboration among our employees — Owens Corning is actively working to mitigate our negative impact around the world. Photo submitted by: Caio Tralba | São Paulo, Brazil Toque Grande beach, São Paulo. 2030 Renewable Electricity GOAL: 100% R ENEWABLE 51% 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 48% 50% 2019 52% 2020 2030 Energy Efficiency (MWh) GOAL: 20% REDUCTION 2% 10,499,961 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 10,719,236 4% 10,274,193 2019 10% 9,658,731 2020

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 22 Combating Climate Change By 2030, our goal is a 50% reduction in absolute Scope 1 and Scope 2 market-based greenhouse gas from the base year of 2018. ■ Scope 1 refers to the direct emissions from our own manufacturing operations. ■ Scope 2 refers to indirect emissions from the generation of purchased energy. We also have a goal to reduce absolute Scope 3 emissions by 30%. ■ Scope 3 refers to other indirect emissions, primarily those from our supply chain. Photo submitted by: Michele Mazza | Trophy Club, Texas, U.S. Monarch butterfly. Absolute Scope 1 and Scope 2 (Market-Based) Greenhouse Gas Emissions (metric tons of CO 2 e) GOAL: 50% R EDUCTION 12% 3,426,681 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 3,882,168 5% 3,674,834 2019 14% 3,352,168 2020 Absolute Scope 3 Greenhouse Gas Emissions (metric tons of CO2e) GOAL: 30% R EDUCTION 8% 3,345,559 2021 7% 3,388,860 2020 0% 3,630,73 1 2019 201 8 BASE YEAR 3,624,857

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 23 Air Quality Management By 2030, we will reduce the aggregate intensity of our emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by 50%. We also manage, track, and report against NOx and SOx air emissions requirements. The ways we measure and control NOx and SOx vary by location and local regulatory requirements. Photo submitted by: Julie Childers | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Key West, Florida, U.S. VOC Emissions Intensity (metric tons normalized by revenue, in millions) GOAL: 50% R EDUCTION 18% 0.273 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 0.331 5% 0.313 2019 10% 0.299 2020 PM 2.5 Emissions Intensity (metric tons normalized by revenue, in millions) GOAL: 50% R EDUCTION 14% 0.280 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 0.326 6% 0.306 2019 11% 0.290 2020

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 24 Responsible Water Sourcing & Consumption By 2030, we will cut in half the amount we take from local water supplies in places where water is limited in quantity or quality. In addition, we intend to ensure that our other facilities remain at the same water intensity as our base of 2018, or lower when aggregated. Photo submitted by: Priyanka Ruparel | Mumbai, India Cityscape in India. High Water-Stress Sites Water Withdrawal Intensity (cubic meters normalized by revenue, in millions) GOAL: 50% R EDUCTION 20% 2,351 2021 All Other Sites Water Withdrawal Intensity (cubic meters normalized by revenue, in millions) GOAL: REMAIN FLAT OR REDUCE 201 8 BASE YEAR 2,94 0 1% 2,90 4 2019 10% 2,63 7 2020

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 25 Waste Management By 2030, we will send zero waste to landfill, using the following two-part plan: ■ Reduce waste intensity by 50% by improving efficiency and process design. ■ Repurpose or recycle the remaining waste, including recycling waste back into our own processes whenever possible. FPO FPO Photo submitted by: Susan Raneri | Massachusetts, U.S. Golf course, Northborough, Massachusetts. Intensity of Waste/Byproducts Generated (metric tons normalized by revenue, in millions) GOAL: 50% R EDUCTION 201 8 BASE YEAR 13 0 7% 12 1 2019 10% 117 2020 17% 108 2021 62% 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 60 % 64% 2020 63% 2019 Percentage of Remaining Waste/Byproducts Repurposed or Recycled GOAL: 100% REPURPOSED OR RECYCLED

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 26 Photo submitted by: Karen Bonner | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee, U.S. Protecting Biodiversity Our 2030 goals for biodiversity will be based on the work we are currently doing to understand the full impact of our operations. We will have established our specific goals based on our findings by 2025. Achieving our biodiversity goals will require a broad- based network of collaborators, both internal and external, including our partnership with the Science Based Target Network, which provides us with a rigorous framework upon which we will build our biodiversity goals. This deep level of cooperation across all levels will be increasingly necessary as we seek to protect the closely interrelated web of species with which we share the planet. Owens Corning uses the Integrated Biodiversity Assessment Tool (IBAT) to gauge our proximity to areas with high biodiversity value. By employing a science-based, data-driven approach, we can make decisions that have the most positive impact for the species we are working to preserve.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 27 Employee Experience By 2030, in conjunction with our inclusion and diversity goals, we will make continuous improvements in recruiting, retention, training and development, mentorship and sponsorship professional growth, and employee engagement. To that end, we have established a number of specific targets: ■ 100% retention of high-potential talent between annual talent reviews. ■ Internal fill rate of 75%-85% for leadership roles. ■ Ensure two “ready now” internal succession candidates for key leadership roles. ■ >95% of staff indicating they are frequently putting all their effort into their work. ■ 90% staff and 85% primary worker response rate to our two global enterprise surveys. EXPANDING OUR SOCIAL HANDPRINT Creating a better world means ensuring a better quality of life for people everywhere — from our employees and their families to people in the communities where we do business. We seek to help our employees thrive during their tenure with us, and for people everywhere live with health, safety, and human dignity. 2030 Retention Target 100% retention of high-potential talent between annual talent reviews. We want to ensure that our top talent remains proud members of the Owens Corning team. According to the Society for Human Resource Managers (SHRM), this is the top quartile for outstanding companies, which makes it a suitable goal for Owens Corning. 2030 Employee Engagement Targets >95% of staff indicating they are frequently putting all their effort into their work. We measure engagement by combining the percentage of people who respond Agree or Strongly Agree on our annual employee engagement survey. This is a common practice among the engagement surveys against which we set our benchmarks. Our figures place us high above the SHRM average of 69% who respond similarly. 90% staff and 85% primary workers response rate to our two global enterprise surveys. Owens Corning measures employee engagement in a variety of ways. For example, every other year, our staff is asked to complete a Leadership Capabilities for Growth survey, and our primary population is asked to complete an Operation Excellence survey. Our survey response rate is already well above the 30-40% average response rates for internal employee surveys, and our goal is increase it even further as we work toward 2030. 2030 Percentage of High-Potential Talent Retained GOAL: 100% 2018 2019 2020 2021 Employee Engagement (% of actively engaged employees) 97% 97% 98% 98% % of total salaried employees responding 89% 89% 89% 89% 96% 2021 201 8 BASE YEA R 96 % 98% 2019 97% 2020 0 20 40 60 80 100 2018 (Base Year ) 2019 2020 2021 2030 Goal Percentage of Prima ry W orkers Percentage of Staf f 2030 Staff Goal 90% Response 2030 Primary Goal 85% Response 89% 80% 89% 80% 89% 80% 89% 70%

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 28 2030 Succession Targets Internal fill rate of 75%-85% for leadership roles. We aspire to have mid-level, director, and vice president-level roles filled by current Owens Corning employees, either through a promotion or as a lateral move, as a percentage of all internal fills and external hires for these roles. As we build our diverse talent pipeline, promoting from within strengthens our inclusive environment as employees see diversity among our leaders. Ensure two “ready now” internal succession candidates for key leadership roles. We calculate this by taking the number of unique candidates who are ready for promotion into the key leadership role divided by the number of succession roles in that business unit. Although strong candidates may be on multiple succession lists, each individual is counted only once within that business unit. In addition, we have set succession targets to help increase representation from women and people of color. Photo submitted by: Danielle Wittorp | Dearborn, Michigan, U.S. Sunflower and bee in a home garden. 2030 Goal 75-85 % within range 2019 84% Staff 2021 82% Staff 2018 BASE YEAR 73% Staff 2020 87% Staff 100% 0% Percentage of Leadership Roles Filled from Within 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 2018 (BASE YEAR) 2019 2020 2021 2030 Goal 2.0 2.22 .2 2.11 .8 Sucession Pipeline Readiness

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 29 People of Color in Leadership As part of our 2030 goals, we have set a target that 22% of our U.S. leadership roles are filled by people of color (POC). In 2021, our representation for these roles was 15%, while overall approximately 51% of U.S. hires were people of color. Inclusive Leadership Training We had set a target for 100% of our people leaders, from first level leaders through mid-level leaders, directors, and vice presidents to attend our internal inclusive leadership training by the end of 2021. While we fell short of that goal, we maintain a 2030 target to maintain training at that level for all new hires or promotions into those roles. Percentage of POC Leaders 2030 GOAL: 22% 15% 2021 2018 BASE YEAR 13% 14% 2019 14% 2020 Women in Leadership We have established a 2030 target in which 35% of our global mid-level leader, director, and vice president roles are filled by women. Percentage of Female Leaders 2030 GOAL: 35% 27% 2021 2018 BASE YEAR 24% 25% 2019 25% 2020 Percentage of Females in Successor Pool 2030 GOAL: >35% 30% 2021 2018 BASE YEAR 25% 26% 2019 28% 2020 Inclusion & Diversity By 2030, we aspire to: ■ Build and support diverse workforce and leadership teams that reflect the communities in which we live, work, and serve. ■ Retain diverse candidates proportional to the communities in which we live, work, and serve. ■ Increase internal succession with an emphasis on expanding the number of female candidates, underrepresented minorities, and representation of cultures from around the world. ■ Demonstrate transparency regarding pay equity through periodic third-party reviews and ongoing internal analytics. We have formalized our commitment to these goals by setting several specific targets that quantify our inclusion and diversity aspirations. Percentage of People of Color in Successor Pool 2030 GOAL: >22% 17% 2021 2018 BASE YEAR 16% 14% 2019 18% 2020

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 30 Photo submitted by: Kelly Picking | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Inclusive Leadership Training We had set a target for 100% of our people leaders, from first level leaders through mid-level leaders, directors, and vice presidents to attend our internal inclusive leadership training by the end of 2021. While we fell short of that goal, we maintain a 2030 target to maintain training at that level for all new hires or promotions into those roles. Percentage of People Leaders Trained on Inclusive Leadership 2030 GOAL: 100% 82% 2021 2018 BASE YEAR 24% 2019 56% 2020

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 31 Community Engagement By 2030, 100% of our employees will be actively engaged in their communities through company- sponsored activities. As part of this goal, we continue to engage facilities in community projects. By 2022, we intend to see 100% facility engagement, which will serve as a foundation for our broader 2030 goal. Number of Volunteer Experiences* While COVID-19 restrictions led to a significant drop in volunteer experiences between 2019 and 2020, we are pleased to see our numbers trending upward in 2021. We are confident that volunteering will continue to increase as more communities begin to emerge from the pandemic. * While our ability to track and measure employee volunteerism improves every year, we are currently only able to track the number of volunteer experiences and not individual volunteers. The number of volunteer experiences serves as an informative reference as we expand our reach to all global facilities. Living Safely By 2030, we aspire to achieve the following goals: ■ Make it impossible for injuries and illnesses to occur. Ideally, we will do this by designing equipment and processes to eliminate risk. When an engineering solution isn’t possible, we will continue to evaluate and implement strong rules and policies and ensure use of appropriate protective equipment to keep people from hazards. ■ In new or newly acquired sites, achieve a level of safety at least equivalent to the rest of Owens Corning within one year. In 2021, Owens Corning acquired vliepa GmbH, a German-based company specializing in the coating, printing, and finishing of nonwovens, paper, and film for the building materials industry. We have been working to apply our safety processes to their operations as we complete the acquisition of this company. ■ Emphasize the elimination of risks that could lead to the most serious injuries, rather than concentrating on only the most frequent ones. We aspire to eliminate all employee, contractor, and visitor injuries and occupational illnesses at work and at home, beginning with the ones that have the most serious consequences. While Owens Corning has a long-standing commitment to safety, we recognize there is still work to do as we keep our eye on our 2030 goals. Our recordable incident rate (number of injuries x 200,000 / total labor hours) in 2021 was 0.59. This is 81% below the industry average, as reported by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics for 2021 (the most recent data available). In addition, 48% of our global facilities were injury-free in 2021. The severity of our incidents, measured by our lost-time injury frequency rate (lost workday cases x 1,000,000/total labor hours) was 1.69.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Overview | Summary & Highlights | 32 Health & Wellness By 2030, we aspire to eliminate all lifestyle-induced disease and enable the best possible quality of life — where people flourish and are healthier because they work for Owens Corning. Human Rights & Ethics By 2030, 100% of our suppliers will meet our Supplier Code of Conduct requirements, with special attention on human rights issues such as safety and forced labor. While complying with privacy laws and local expectations, we will use accessible data, as well as health and behavioral science, to define metrics that will guide our strategies and tactics to achieve our goals. We will be guided by the frameworks established by the U.S. Healthy People 2030 as well as the WHO Global Action Plan. Each framework is based on indicators that measure both health risks and the burden of disease around the world. Owens Corning recognizes that change is inevitable, and it’s happening faster than ever. As we look ahead to 2030, we recognize that we must be prepared to anticipate change — and innovate accordingly. We are confident that the goals we have set are within our reach, thanks to the collective spirit of dedication, collaboration, and ingenuity of our employees around the world. Photo submitted by: Jim Close | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, U.S. Each year, we conduct a survey assessment of our key suppliers. In 2021, those suppliers constituted 74% of our sourcing managed spend. They are asked to report their own policies regarding a range of topics, including human rights and ethics. Of the suppliers who have responded to our survey assessments over the past three years, 98% reported that they meet the standards set by our Supplier Code of Conduct. 98% 2021 201 8 BASE YEAR 95% 2019 96% 2020 Supplier Code of Conduct Compliance GOAL: 100%

      In this section, we discuss the various factors that influence how we think about sustainability — and the steps we will take to achieve our 2030 goals. ■ Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues ■ UN Sustainable Development Goals Alignment ■ Board Leadership ■ Risk Management ■ Digital Transformation ■ Compliance and Beyond ■ Total Productive Maintenance ■ Ta x OUR APPROACH

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 34 STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & MATERIAL ISSUES In this chapter: ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ MATERIALITY GRIDS Sustainability means meeting the needs of the present while leaving the world a better place for the future. That requires a sharp focus on the issues we face and an emphasis on collaboration, both within our organization and among our various stakeholders. Owens Corning works continuously to identify the material issues that most directly impact our operations, then we develop effective strategies to address them in partnership with a wide range of people and organizations. Photo submitted by: Andy Davis | Granville, Ohio, U.S. A bee pollinating a Rose of Sharon flower.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 35 OUR APPROACH Owens Corning is committed to objectively identifying material issues and evaluating their level of impact across our value chain. In support of this, Owens Corning is devoted to the assessment of our materiality matrix on a five-year cycle in accordance with AA1000 methodology. Our most recent Materiality Assessment was conducted in 2019. As part of our ongoing processes, we continue to evaluate the impact of any significant changes to our operations for potential risks or areas that could have a positive or negative impact on our stated goals. We have developed a process of stakeholder engagement, reviewing both internal and external groups. Photos submitted by: Susan Raneri | Massachusetts, U.S. Golf course, Northborough, Massachusetts. Karolina Koscianska | Trzemeszno, Poland (top, right) Mineral wool manufacturing plant in Hässleholm, Sweden. Danielle Wittorp | Dearborn, Michigan, U.S. (bottom, right) Flower garden.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 36 MATERIALITY & ENGAGEMENT INITIATIVES In 2021, we conducted another refresh of the 2019 Materiality Assessment, in which we sought to confirm the continued relevance of the existing Material Topics and their relative positioning within the materiality matrix visuals, for the company as a whole and broken out by region. The refresh and review process can be described in three steps: ■ Reassess scopes of material topics and input data for material topics. ■ Refresh the AI-driven aspects of the assessment to incorporate new industry benchmark, regulatory, news, and social data into the models. ■ A sustainability review to determine if the materiality assessment conducted in 2019 continues to accurately represent the company’s sustainability strategy, impacts, and goals, or if there has been a significant enough change to the company strategy or model inputs to require further revisions. In 2021, Owens Corning acquired vliepa GmbH, a German- based company specializing in the coating, printing, and finishing of nonwovens, paper, and film for the building materials industry. With this acquisition came an opportunity to reexamine our approach to sustainability materiality. We developed a process for assessing the materiality impact of new acquisitions, which looks at aspects such as the acquisition’s size and location, the products that they make, the markets they serve, their environmental footprint, and their social impacts such as safety and inclusion and diversity. This process enables us to determine if the acquisition is significantly impactful in scope or scale compared to our company, which can then lead to updates to our sustainability priorities and impacts that reflect both our existing company and the acquisition. Based on this review, it was determined that the vliepa acquisition did not require an update of our materiality assessment topic scopes, or relative matrix positions. This was due to vliepa’s alignment within Owens Corning’s existing product mix, as well as vliepa’s small size relative to Owens Corning as an enterprise. While this acquisition did not require an update to our sustainability materiality, it was an important step to develop a process for the consistent consideration of new acquisitions, as this process can potentially be used in the future as well. A sustainability review was conducted of the topic mapping, and the preliminary matrix data, taking into account the changes due to refreshing the data sources, and in the case of new Datamaran ontology, refreshing the underlying aspects of the material topics themselves. Through this assessment, it was determined that some topics did have slight movements in their weighting due to the new data. Despite these minor movements, the fundamental positions of the Material Topics, such as where topics lie in regions of the graph, were not significantly changed, and the Material Topics and their visual representations continue to represent Owens Corning’s material sustainability topics accurately. Photo submitted by: Leila Pourzahedi | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Squamish, British Columbia, Canada.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 37 Material Topics The following issues serve as Owens Corning’s Material Sustainability Topics. They were selected after close review of the company’s prior work on sustainability and materiality, research into best practices, examination of peer companies within our industry, and interviews with subject matter experts. Each topic is discussed in more detail in the corresponding chapter of this report. Community Engagement Owens Corning strives to contribute to thriving communities where we work, where we live, and where we have the potential to make a positive impact. Employee Experience We believe our employees should grow as people and as professionals while working at Owens Corning. We seek to attract the best people and provide every employee with the opportunity to develop and reach their full potential, in a work environment full of both challenge and optimism. Energy Efficiency & Sourcing Renewable Energy We are determined to continue decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels, both by improving efficiency in our operations and by meeting more of our energy demands through renewable sources. Health & Wellness We promote a healthy and tobacco-free lifestyle for all our employees and their families. We are committed to ending lifestyle-induced disease in our employees, as well as promoting mental, physical, and financial well-being. Human Rights Owens Corning has the privilege of working with people all over the world. We believe that this privilege comes with the responsibility to treat all people with dignity and respect and to protect their fundamental rights. We are committed to being a leader in setting and upholding the highest standards for safeguarding human rights. Air Quality Management As a manufacturer, we have the opportunity to improve our processes and, in doing so, reduce our impact on air quality in the areas where we operate. Biodiversity Biodiversity describes the variety of life that keeps nature’s ecosystems in balance. Owens Corning is committed to preserving and enhancing biodiversity and the natural habitats that surround our operations around the world. We seek to understand and manage the biodiversity impact of all our own operations, as well as gain insights into the impacts of our supply chain on biodiversity. Circular Economy A circular economy is one in which virgin raw materials, waste, energy, and emissions are minimized through intelligent design, renewable and recycled inputs, energy-efficient production, and enabling the recyclability of products at the end of their life cycles. We are committed to supporting the global transformation to a circular economy. Combating Climate Change Owens Corning understands the importance of climate action, and we take our role in the fight against climate change seriously. We have embraced a Science-Based Target for our greenhouse gas emissions in line with the most stringent standard, designed to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. We also have a target to reduce our Scope 3 emissions, representing emissions from our supply chain. Inclusion & Diversity We aim to foster an environment which represents people with various racial, ethnic, gender, religious, language, socioeconomic, family and cultural backgrounds, as well as people with different lived experiences, lifestyles, and interests, engaged and working together to create a fair, healthy, and high-performing organization. Inclusion enables employees to feel valued, understood, and inspired to bring their whole selves to work. Living Safely As a company, we are committed to promoting safety for all. We believe that all accidents are preventable, at work and at home. Product Innovation & Stewardship We work to utilize innovation and the principles of product stewardship to ensure that our products are fundamentally safe and sustainable in their design, creation, use, and eventual disposal. We also seek to drive continual improvement in the sustainability of the products we offer, both in their creation and in their ability to help the world meet its sustainability needs. Responsible Water Sourcing & Consumption We are committed to using water in an intelligent, sustainable way across the company. We operate in a number of different regions across the world, some of which are in areas of higher water stress than others. Through reuse, recycling, and efficiency, we strive to consume less water in our operations. We also must understand where our water use is most impactful, to set informed targets for water reduction.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 38 Supply Chain Sustainability We strive to hold our suppliers to the same high standards we hold ourselves. We see our suppliers as key contributors to our overall sustainability vision, and we seek to ensure all our suppliers fully comply with all applicable legislation, regulations, and legal requirements on human rights, labor, the environment, anticorruption, and trade and customs. Waste Management Our ambition is to mitigate the waste that we produce by redesigning the process to avoid its creation, then repurposing it whenever possible. We are committed to redefining waste, continuously looking for beneficial uses for our byproducts and other waste materials. Stakeholder Engagement Owens Corning interacts with a wide range of stakeholders on a regular basis. These stakeholders range from investors, customers, suppliers, community members, trade associations, and NGOs, to name a few. Through these engagements, we seek to accurately and transparently discuss our efforts, understand concerns, and work together for solutions. Customers Suppliers NGOs Governmental Agencies Employees Investors Trade and Industry Associations Media Communities Potential Employees Social media ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Website information ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Meetings and conference calls ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Conferences, speaking engagements ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Surveys, focus groups ✔ ✔ ✔ Visits and account management ✔ ✔ Education/ summits ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Internal communications ✔ Volunteer and community projects ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Memberships, sponsorship, board service, or project support ✔ ✔ ✔ 1-800-GETPINK and GETTECH@ owenscorning. com ✔ ✔ ✔ Our Material Topics represent our stakeholders’ priorities with consideration of our impacts, and they’re informed by the UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. This report is organized by these topics to show how our efforts, our goals, and our stakeholders’ priorities align.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 39 OWENS CORNING’S MATERIALITY GRIDS Our Materiality Matrices are structured to adhere to GRI standards. In contrast with traditional matrices, this type of matrix reflects the significance of environmental, social, and governance (ESG) impacts to the company, as well as the influence a Material Topic has on stakeholders in their assessments and decision-making. In addition, we have developed grids that reflect regional materiality concerns. The completed matrices reflect the following regions: ■ Americas ■ Asia Pacific ■ Europe Global Materiality Regional Assessment Results | Americas Materiality 0 .10 0 .10 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 INFLUENCE ON STAKEHOLDERS HUMAN RIGHTS RESPONSIBLE WATER SOURCING & CONSUMPTION H E A LT H & WELLNESS BIODIVERSITY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT SUSTAINABLE GROWTH WASTE MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY & SOURCING RENEWABLE ENERGY LIVING S A F E LY PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP CIRCULAR ECONOMY INCLUSION & DIVERSITY RELEVANCE TO COMPANY ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC, AND SOCIAL IMPACTS  Product Sustainability  Environmental Sustainability  Social Sustainability 0 .10 0 .10 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 INFLUENCE ON STAKEHOLDERS RELEVANCE TO COMPANY ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC, AND SOCIAL IMPACTS HUMAN RIGHTS RESPONSIBLE WATER SOURCING & CONSUMPTION H E A LT H & WELLNESS BIODIVERSITY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT SUSTAINABLE GROWTH WASTE MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY & SOURCING RENEWABLE ENERGY LIVING S A F E LY PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP CIRCULAR ECONOMY INCLUSION & DIVERSITY

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Stakeholder Engagement & Material Issues | 40 0 .10 0 .10 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0 .15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 RELEVANCE TO COMPANY ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC, AND SOCIAL IMPACTS INFLUENCE ON STAKEHOLDERS HUMAN RIGHTS HEALTH & WELLNESS BIODIVERSITY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT SUSTAINABLE GROWTH WASTE MANAGEMENT SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE ENERGY EFFICIENCY & SOURCING RENEWABLE ENERGY LIVING S A F E LY PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP CIRCULAR ECONOMY INCLUSION & DIVERSITY Regional Assessment Results | Asia Pacific Materiality Regional Assessment Results | Europe Materiality RESPONSIBLE WATER SOURCING & CONSUMPTION 0 .10 0.20 0.30 0.40 0.50 0.60 0.70 0.80 RELEVANCE TO COMPANY ENVIRONMENTAL, ECONOMIC, AND SOCIAL IMPACTS INFLUENCE ON STAKEHOLDERS 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50 0.55 0.60 0.0 BIODIVERSITY COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT H E A LT H & WELLNESS HUMAN RIGHTS AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBLE WATER SOURCING & CONSUMPTION SUSTAINABLE GROWTH INCLUSION & DIVERSITY SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE WASTE MANAGEMENT LIVING SAFELY ENERGY EFFICIENCY & SOURCING RENEWABLE ENERGY COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE CIRCULAR ECONOMY PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 41 UNITED NATIONS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS ALIGNMENT The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were established in 2015 as a framework for governments, businesses, and individuals to use in addressing our society’s most pressing issues. By setting our collective sights on these goals, we can help reduce inequality, fight climate change, and more. As Owens Corning has set its own sustainability goals, we have looked to the UN SDGs for guidance and insight. The 17 UN SDGs are as follows: NO POVERTY 3 End poverty in all its forms everywhere. ZERO HUNGER 3 End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture. GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING 1 Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages. QUALITY EDUCATION 2 Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. GENDER EQUALITY 1 Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. CLEAN WATER AND SANITATION 1 Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. AFFORDABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY 1 Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all. DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH 1 Promote sustained, inclusive, and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment, and decent work for all. INDUSTRY, INNOVATION, AND INFRASTRUCTURE 1 Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization, and foster innovation. REDUCED INEQUALITIES 2 Reduce inequality within and among countries. SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES 2 Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable. RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION 1 Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns. CLIMATE ACTION 1 Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts. LIFE BELOW WATER 3 Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas, and marine resources for sustainable development. LIFE ON LAND 2 Protect, restore, and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, halt and reverse land degradation, and halt biodiversity loss. PEACE, JUSTICE, AND STRONG INSTITUTIONS 2 Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all, and build effective, accountable, and inclusive institutions at all levels. PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE GOALS 1 Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development. 1 SDGs for which we believe we have the most direct impact or influence through our core business competencies and which are also material to our business. 2 SDGs for which believe we have a lesser and less direct impact, but which nonetheless reflect our values, policies, and outreach work. These may also have a significant impact on stakeholders’ decisions and perceptions about our company. 3 SDGs for which we perceive the least direct influence or impact, although these SDGs do have some overlap with others, our sustainability efforts, and our business. We do still measure and report on some of the indicators. Definitions taken from the Global Goals for Sustainable Development website .

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 42 MATERIAL TOPIC EXPLANATION 2030 GOALS MOST RELEVANT SDGs CIRCULAR ECONOMY A circular economy is one in which virgin raw materials, waste, energy, and emissions are minimized through intelligent design, renewable and recyclable input, energy- efficient production, and enabling the recycling of products at the end of their life cycles. We are committed to supporting the global transformation to a circular economy. Establish viable circular economy business models involving our materials and how they are used by collaborating up and down the supply chain with customers, suppliers, communities, academics, policy makers, government entities, and other organizations. Increase recycled content and decrease virgin raw materials used in our products. Develop technical solutions and practical business models for our product materials and packaging to continuously be used for beneficial purposes even after they are no longer used for the original purpose. PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP We work to utilize innovation in the principles of product stewardship to ensure that our products are fundamentally safe and sustainable in their design, creation, use, and eventual end of life. We also seek to drive continuous improvement in the sustainability of the products we offer, both in their creation and in their ability to help the world meet its sustainability needs. Offer the most recognized and preferred products for sustainability. SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY We strive to hold our suppliers to the same high standards we hold ourselves. We see our suppliers as a key contributor to our overall sustainability vision and seek to ensure all our suppliers fully comply with all applicable legislation, regulations, and legal requirements on human rights, labor, the environment, anti-corruption, and trade and customs. Collaborate with suppliers to increase transparency around the raw materials we use in our products. Reduce the greenhouse gas emissions related to our purchased materials and services by collaborating with our suppliers to cut these emissions by 30%. Our target has been validating and approved by the Science-Based Target Initiative. 100% of our global sourcing team will be trained and recertified annually of sustainability. SUSTAINABLE GROWTH As a company with sustainability at our core, we aim to align our company’s growth with sustainable trends and positive global impact. We achieve sustainable growth through serving our customers, fulfilling their need for quality, sustainable products. We are working to build a financially successful company with sustainability at its core. Design our products for recycling or reuse to optimize the impact of our products over their entire life cycle, from raw materials to disposal. UN SDGS & OUR 2030 GOALS Owens Corning’s overall commitment to sustainability includes partnerships and collaborations with a wide range of organizations, governmental agencies, NGOs, and industry associations. In addition, we are proud to participate in the UN Global Compact, which has set forth ten guiding principles related to human rights, labor, environmental issues, and anti-corruption. EXPANDING OUR PRODUCT HANDPRINT Guiding Aspiration: Double the positive impact of our products. The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are an important consideration in our assessment of materiality. We have identified specific areas of alignment between our material topics, our 2030 sustainability goals, and the SDGs, shown in the table that follows.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 43 MATERIAL TOPIC EXPLANATION 2030 GOALS MOST RELEVANT SDGs AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT As a manufacturer, we have the opportunity to improve our processes and, in doing so, reduce our impact on air quality in the areas where we operate. Reduce the aggregate intensity of our emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by 50%. COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE Owens Corning understands the importance of climate action, and we take our role in the fight against climate change seriously. We have embraced a science-based target for greenhouse gas emissions in line with the most stringent standard, designed to limit global warming to 1.5° Celsius. We also have a target to reduce our Scope 3 emissions, in line with well below the two degrees Celsius methodology, representing emissions from our supply chain. Achieve 50% reduction in absolute Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions from the 2018 baseline, in line with what is needed to limit global warming to 1.5° C. Our target has been validated and approved by the Science-Based Target Initiative. We also have a goal to reduce absolute Scope 3 emissions by 30%. WASTE MANAGEMENT Our ambition is to mitigate the waste that we produce by redesigning the process to avoid its creation, then repurposing it whenever possible. We are committed to redefining waste, continuously looking for beneficial uses for our byproducts and other waste materials. Send zero waste to landfill by cutting the amount of waste we generate in half and recycling the rest. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND SOURCING RENEWABLE ENERGY We are determined to continue decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels, both by improving efficiency in our operations and by meeting more of our energy demands through renewable sources. Source 100% renewable electricity. Switching to 100% renewable electricity and purchasing energy from renewable sources are essential to our effort to halve our greenhouse gas emissions. We will also work to reduce emissions from our processes and improve energy efficiency. This will put us on the path to eventually eliminating our use of fossil fuels. RESPONSIBLE WATER SOURCING AND CONSUMPTION We are committed to using water in an intelligent, sustainable way across the company. We operate in a number of different regions across the world, some of which are in areas of higher water stress than others. Through reuse, recycling, and efficiency, we strive to consume less water in our operations. We also must understand where our water use is most impactful, to set informed targets for water reduction. Cut in half the amount we take from the local water supply in places where water is limited in quantity or quality, while other facilities remain at the same water intensity as our base year of 2018 or lower when aggregated. PROTECTING BIODIVERSITY Biodiversity describes the variety of life that keep nature’s ecosystem in balance. Owens Corning is committed to preserving and enhancing biodiversity and the natural habitats that surround our operations around the world. We seek to understand and manage the biodiversity impact of all our own operations, as well as gain insights into the impacts of our supply chain on biodiversity. Develop biodiversity goals based on an understanding of the full impact of our operations and supply chain on biodiversity by 2025. REDUCING OUR ENVIRONMENTAL FOOTPRINT Guiding Aspiration: Cut the negative impact of our operations in half.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 44 MATERIAL TOPIC EXPLANATION 2030 GOALS MOST RELEVANT SDGs EMPLOYEE EXPERIENCE We believe our employees should grow as people and as professionals while working at Owens Corning. We seek to attract the best people and provide every employee with the opportunity to develop and reach their full potential, in a work environment full of both challenge and optimism. Make continuous improvements in recruiting, retention, training and development, mentorship and sponsorship, professional growth, and employee engagement. INCLUSION AND DIVERSITY We aim to foster an inclusive and diverse environment, one which represents a range of people with various racial, ethnic, gender, religious, language, socioeconomic, and cultural backgrounds and different sexual orientations, experience, and interests, engaged and working together to create a fair, healthy, and high-performing organization. Inclusion enables employees to feel valued, understood, and inspired to bring their whole selves to work. Build and support diverse workforce and leadership teams that reflect the communities in which we live, work, and serve. Retain diverse candidates proportional to the communities in which we live, work, and serve. Increase internal succession with an emphasis on expanding the number of female candidates, people of color, and representation of cultures from around the world. Demonstrate pay equity through periodic third-party reviews and ongoing internal analytics. COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Owens Corning strives to contribute to thriving communities, where we work, where we live, and where we have the potential to make a positive impact. 100% of our employees are actively engaged in their communities. LIVING SAFELY As a company, we are committed to promoting safety for all. We believe that all accidents are preventable, at work and at home. Make it impossible for injuries and illnesses to occur. Ideally, we will do this by designing equipment and processes to eliminate risk. When an engineering solution is not possible, we will continue to evaluate and implement strong rules and policies and ensure use of appropriate protective equipment to keep people from hazards. In new or newly acquired sites, achieve a level of safety at least equivalent to the rest of Owens Corning within one year. Emphasize the elimination of risks that could lead to the most serious injuries, rather than concentrating on the most frequent ones. HEALTH AND WELLNESS We promote a healthy and tobacco-free lifestyle for all our employees and their families. We are committed to ending lifestyle-induced disease in our employees and promoting mental, physical, and financial well-being. We aspire to eliminate all lifestyle-induced disease and enable the best possible quality of life — where people flourish and are healthier because they work for Owens Corning. HUMAN RIGHTS & ETHICS Owens Corning has the privilege of working with people all over the world. We believe that this privilege comes with the responsibility to treat all people with dignity and respect and to protect their fundamental rights. We are committed in being a leader in setting and upholding the highest standards for safeguarding human rights. 100% of our suppliers meet our Supplier Code of Conduct requirements, with special attention to human rights issues such as safety and forced labor. EXPANDING OUR SOCIAL HANDPRINT Guiding Aspiration: Eliminate injuries and improve the quality of life for our employees and their families. Have a positive impact on our communities. Advance our inclusion and diversity.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 45 Highlights on progress toward the nine SDGs where we believe we have the most direct impact are outlined below, and they are discussed more fully throughout the report. Good Health and Well-Being With our commitment to zero injuries and our Healthy Living platform, we have goals or actions for many of the indicators for SDG #3. SDG Target 3.4 | By 2030, reduce by one-third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) through prevention and treatment, and promote mental health and well-being. Our aggregated data found a high correlation between U.S. employees who participate in our Healthy Living programs and reduction in our disease burden. We have increased our international engagement with our Healthy Living platform in Latin America, Europe, and Asia Pacific. All three regions are creating regionally appropriate, fit-for-purpose systems parallel to those we have in the U.S. to drive achievement in the six pillars. In addition, we continued to apply the principles of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) to issues related to health and well-being. SDG Target 3.5 | Strengthen prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol. In response to the U.S. opioid crisis, Owens Corning’s policy limits short- acting opioid prescriptions to a three- day supply. We observed the following in 2021: ■ An 11.8% drop in opioid pills dispensed from 2020. Since the three-day limit was implemented, the number of pills dispensed has dropped by 57%. ■ There was a 15% drop in pills dispensed on prescriptions longer than three days compared to 2020 — a reduction of over 50% since the limit was implemented. ■ In 2021, the number of prescribers asking for authorization beyond the three-day initial limit decreased by 1.3%. SDG Target 3.6 | By 2020, halve global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents. We continue our policy banning cell phone use to conduct company business and encourage employees to do so with families to prevent distracted driving. SDG Target 3.8 | Achieve universal health care coverage (UHC), including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health care services, and access to safe, effective, quality, and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all. Engagement with our Healthy Living platform stayed relatively flat in 2021, while participation in key areas, such as biometric screenings and health risk assessment completion, have improved. We have created a global strategy to help us achieve our 2030 goals and support our employees in achieving and maintaining excellent quality of life. Among our first priorities is to develop a global measurement and reporting process that can be used to track employees’ health data in all regions. SDG Target 3.9 | By 2030 substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water, and soil pollution and contamination. We made progress on our goals to reduce our emissions footprint worldwide, and with our product stewardship process that helps ensure that all products (new and existing) are safe to make, use, perform as intended, and can be disposed of responsibly. SDG Target 3.A | Strengthen implementation of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate. Owens Corning offers many resources to our employees, including on-site group coaching, small group discussions, and nicotine replacement therapy and medications, We are approaching our goal of being 100% tobacco-free. As of the end of 2021, 98.5% of our employees work in tobacco-free facilities. Gender Equality We measure gender diversity across our workforce, and our diversity efforts include programs for ensuring equity and increasing the participation of women in our business. SDG Target 5.1 | End all forms of discrimination against all women and girls everywhere. Owens Corning believes its success is enhanced by an inclusive and diverse workforce, which adds value to the business by fostering an environment that leads to high engagement and innovative thinking in the workplace. Owens Corning operates programs that foster gender and ethnic diversity as well as equality within its workforce. The company has implemented a robust pay equity gap review, which includes multiple processes and controls that are executed during its hiring and annual merit review. This program is designed to prevent pay equity gaps from occurring. We ensure the success of this review by performing a biennial pay equity review with the assistance of a third-party vendor. The third-party review includes a robust, statistical analysis of pay equity across its global salaried workforce. Consistent with its commitment to “equal pay for equal work,” the company remediates all identified and substantiated pay gaps through pay increases. The review in 2021, demonstrated that less than 1.4% of its 5,700 global salaried employees required remediation, at a total cost of less than .02% of annual global salaries. Further, the company has implemented processes and policies to avoid inheriting unequal pay bias of prior employers.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 46 SDG Target 5.2 | Eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres, including trafficking and sexual and other types of exploitation. We continue to strengthen our processes to ensure our human rights policy is implemented worldwide. SDG Target 5.5 | Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life. Our Women’s Inclusion Network (WIN) made significant strides toward its mission to attract, retain, and develop outstanding women through professional development, personal development, and community involvement. Throughout 2021, WIN sponsored a number of events, including a series of panel discussions touching on topics such as planned family leave, career and development planning, and the roles of women in leadership across different cultures. Our Composites business formed Women in Operations (WIO) in the summer of 2020 to help support and elevate the role of women in the operations team. By its first anniversary in 2021, the group consisted of more than 100 women and allies and effected change throughout the company, with a priority on education, mentoring, networking, and career development. WIO sponsored a wide range of activities over the course of the year, including lunch-and-learns, one-on-one mentor/mentee relationships, mentor circles, and stay interviews. Women hold 27% of management positions in Owens Corning, and currently there are three women serving as directors on our board, representing 30%. Clean Water and Sanitation Owens Corning has goals in place to source and consume water responsibly. In addition, Owens Corning has made CDP’s Water A List for the third year in a row. SDG Target 6.4 | By 2030, substantially increase water-use efficiency across all sectors and ensure sustainable withdrawals and supply of freshwater to address water scarcity and substantially reduce the number of people suffering from water scarcity. By 2030, we aim to cut in half the amount we take from local water supplies in places where water is limited in quantity or quality. In addition, we intend to ensure that our other facilities remain at the same water intensity as our base year of 2018, or lower when aggregated. SDG Target 6.6 | By 2020, protect and restore water-related ecosystems, including mountains, forests, wetlands, rivers, aquifers, and lakes. Owens Corning has begun the process of deepening our understanding of the biodiversity that exists in the areas where we maintain a presence. Through this work, we will be better equipped to discover how we can preserve and enhance biodiversity and the natural habitats that surround our operations around the world. We will develop biodiversity goals based on an understanding of the full impact of our operations and supply chain on biodiversity by 2025. SDG Target 6.B | Support and strengthen the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management. At Owens Corning, our people and products make the world a better place — and we put that belief into practice through our many community outreach initiatives. We also look for projects that empower our employees to take an active role in their communities. Owens Corning has a number of long-standing partnerships with U.S.-based charitable organizations, each of which provides vital services to communities across the country. These include Habitat for Humanity, the Gary Sinise Foundation, and World Vision. Outside the U.S., Owens Corning works with Give2Asia, the Charities Aid Foundation, and the King Baudouin Foundation, to identify appropriate charities in our various regions around the globe, perform the necessary due diligence required by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and then to transfer the funds. All three of these organizations specialize in helping corporate foundations grant in countries outside of the U.S. Affordable and Clean Energy As part of our 2030 goal cycle, we will work to reduce energy use from both renewable and non-renewable electricity, as well as other forms of non-renewable energy by 20% from our baseline year. SDG Target 7.2 | By 2030, increase substantially the share of renewable energy in the global energy mix. SDG Target 7.3 | By 2030, double of the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency. Over our goal cycle, we will work to reduce energy use from both renewable and non-renewable electricity, as well as other forms of non-renewable energy by 20% from our baseline year of 2018. In 2021 — a year of increased production — Owens Corning increased its overall consumption of direct energy, including the fuel usage in operation, by 8.3% from 2020. We increased consumption of indirect energy, which includes the use of electricity, steam, and district heating, by 9.6%. With regard to energy efficiency, we are currently at a 2% energy use reduction in 2021 compared to our 2018 base year.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 47 Purchasing electricity only from renewable sources is a key part of our effort to halve our greenhouse gas emissions. We will also work to reduce the emissions from our processes and improve energy efficiency. In 2021, approximately 51% of our electricity came from renewable sources, which represents continued progress toward our goal in a year of increased production and corresponding electricity consumption. Overall, our reduction can be attributed to the conservation measures we have taken to significantly reduce energy consumption and improve plant efficiency. Since 2006, Owens Corning has implemented over 1,250 energy-use efficiency and reduction projects in our facilities around the world. The result has been a reduction in estimated usage of more than 1.45 million MWh per year. Additionally, we offer an extensive portfolio of products that can help our customers save energy and avoid emissions. In 2021, 63% of our revenue came from this category of products. SDG Target 7.A | By 2030, enhance international cooperation to facilitate access to clean energy research and technology, including renewable energy, energy efficiency and advanced and cleaner fossil fuel technology, and promote investment in energy infrastructure and clean energy technology. In 2021, approximately 51% of our electricity across our portfolio globally came from renewable sources, such as wind, hydro, solar, and geothermal. Decent Work and Economic Growth Our vision for a sustainable enterprise includes attention to environmental and social progress, human rights, and an employee experience that leads employees to want to recommend the company to a friend. SDG Target 8.2 | Achieve higher levels of economic productivity through diversification, technological upgrading and innovation, including through a focus on high-value added and labor-intensive sectors. In 2021, Owens Corning launched PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation, which features a number of innovations that increase our overall product handprint. In addition to setting a new industry standard for recycled content, PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation is certified made with 100% renewable electricity through the use of power purchase agreements and has earned Underwriter Laboratories GREENGUARD ® certification for low volatile organic compounds. The trade association NAIMA estimates that insulation saves 12 times the energy required to manufacture it within the first year of its use, and PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation offers even greater sustainability advantages. It is easy to cut and install and recovers instantly, making the process up to 23% faster. The FOAMULAR ® NGX™ (Next Generation Extruded) insulation line features a proprietary blowing agent that is optimized to demonstrate a greater than 80% reduction in embodied carbon, compared to legacy FOAMULAR ® insulation products. With this advancement, Owens Corning offers customers another way to meet local regulations — and their own sustainability goals — with no diminishment in product performance. The PAROC ® Natura line of stone wool insulation uses low-carbon melting technology, green electricity, recycled waste materials, and new technologies to reduce the amount of virgin raw material used and offer a product with very low CO 2 emissions. The remaining emissions are compensated by reducing CO 2 emissions through the purchase of offsets in a Verified Emissions Reduction Scheme. The new product line, which is certified as carbon-neutral by a third- party, offers fire-safe, durable insulation that does not decay when wet. PAROC ® Natura became available in Finland, Norway, and Sweden at the beginning of 2021. SDG Target 8.4 | Improve progressively, through 2030, global resource efficiency in consumption and production and endeavor to decouple economic growth from environmental degradation, in accordance with the 10-year framework of programs on sustainable consumption and production, with developed countries taking the lead. Owens Corning is taking every opportunity to transform our operations to a circular economy model, one in which virgin raw materials, waste, energy and emissions are minimized through intelligent design, renewable and recycled input, energy- efficient production, and recycling of products at the end their life cycles. In doing so, we are better positioned to achieve more sustainable economic growth — ensuring that we have a net-positive impact by reducing our environmental footprint and increasing our product handprint. By 2030, Owens Corning’s goal is to establish viable circular economy business models involving our materials and how they are used by collaborating up and down the supply chain, with customers, suppliers, communities, academics, policy makers, government entities, and other organizations. We recognize the need to increase the recycled content and decrease the virgin raw materials used in our products. We plan to develop technical solutions and practical business models for our product materials and packaging to continuously be used for beneficial purposes even after they are no longer used for the original purpose. We are calling on our partners throughout our value chain to help us in our transition to a circular economy model and meet our 2030 science-based Scope 3 goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. We will rely on the companies with which we do business to help develop strategies that will limit the extraction of virgin raw materials and seek out new opportunities to keep products that are at the end of their life out of the landfill and useful within the global economy.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 48 SDG Target 8.5 | By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all women and men, including for young people and persons with disabilities, and equal pay for work of equal value. A consistent philosophy in the design, application, and administration of total compensation programs globally ensures equitable treatment for all employees independent of gender, age, or status as a member of an underrepresented population, and we conduct biannual pay reviews to ensure our employees are paid equitably. SDG Target 8.7 | Take immediate and effective measures to eradicate forced labor, end modern slavery and human trafficking and secure the prohibition and elimination of the worst forms of child labor, including recruitment and use of child soldiers, and by 2025 end child labor in all its forms. SDG Target 8.8 | Protect labor rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment. To further align our efforts with the UN SDGs, human rights has been a part of our materiality matrix since 2017, and we have devoted a section of this report to our commitment and progress. We continue to strengthen our processes to ensure our human rights policy is implemented worldwide. Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure All three Owens Corning businesses (Composites, Insulation, and Roofing) engage in research and innovation to deliver products and services that bring performance and durability to infrastructure and the built environment. SDG Target 9.1 | Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all. SDG Target 9.4 | By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities. Regarding both 9.1 and 9.4, we develop materials and systems that create resilient buildings and infrastructure. We currently have 15 products that have received “Made with 100% Renewable Electricity and Reduced Embodied Carbon” certification. These products give commercial architects and specifiers the option of low-carbon products to build greener structures. We offer glass-fiber reinforced bars (rebar), which are corrosion-resistant and helps extend the life of bridges, as well as the PAROC ® Natura line of stone wool insulation discussed under SDG Target 8.2. SDG Target 9.5 | Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending. We have established science and technology centers in key markets worldwide. Our 11 global S&T centers employ scientists and engineers with expertise in a wide range of disciplines, including glass science, chemical engineering, fundamental chemistry, and much more. Our S&T organization includes close to 450 people. Responsible Consumption and Production The sustainability practices we have in place for our operations and supply chain reflect the attention to product sustainability and reducing our manufacturing footprint. SDG Target 12.4 | By 2030, achieve environmentally sound management of chemicals and all wastes throughout their life cycle in accordance with agreed international frameworks and significantly reduce their release to air, water and soil to minimize adverse impacts on human health and the environment. Approximately 36% of our locations were certified to ISO 14001, which accounts for 50% of our employees. In addition, approximately 47% of our locations use our internal Owens Corning EMS, which is based on the principles of ISO 14001, accounting for 36% of our employees. Thus, 83% of our locations have implemented an environmental management system, accounting for 86% of our employees. Further, approximately 47% of our locations were certified to the ISO 9001 standard for a QMS (Quality Management System) in 2021, representing approximately 62% of our employees. We conduct life cycle assessments (LCAs) according to the ISO 14040, 14044, and 14025, as well as ISO 21930 and EN 15804, followed by a third-party review and verification of appropriate product category rules. We have conducted full LCAs on 81% of our products.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 49 SDG Target 12.5 | By 2030 substantially reduce waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling and reuse. Our goal is to send zero waste to landfill by 2030. We have a two-part plan to achieve this. First, we aim to reduce waste intensity by 50% through improvements to efficiency and process design. We will then repurpose or recycle the remaining waste. In 2021, we achieved a 17% reduction in waste/byproducts generated over the base year of 2018, and a 62% overall waste diversion rate compared to 2018. SDG Target 12.6 | Encourage companies, especially large and transnational companies to adopt sustainable practices and to integrate sustainability information into their reporting cycle. We disclose sustainability performance on a number of different platforms. Due to timing and data collection requirements, we have not yet published simultaneous financial and sustainability reports, but we are considering what we would need to do to make that possible. SDG Target 12.7 | Promote public procurement practices that are sustainable in accordance with national policies and priorities. We believe suppliers are critical partners in our sustainability efforts. We discuss our commitments, goals, and expectations in the Supply Chain Sustainability chapter in this report. Climate Change To reduce the impact of our operations and activities on global climate change, we focus on accelerating energy efficiency improvements, renewable energy deployment, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions. SDG Target 13.1 | Strengthen resilience and adaptive capacity to climate related hazards and natural disasters in all countries. We participate with builders, architects, and engineers to provide technical information and product innovations for resilience in building construction and infrastructure. We work with industry associations and consortia to advance understanding of how our materials help combat the effects of climate change — and help support quality of life as people face climate- related challenges. In consultation with experts in the field, Owens Corning began work with The Ohio State University in 2020 to expand our efforts to assess the resilience of our strategies against a range of climate-related scenarios and time horizons. These scenarios will focus on risks and opportunities globally and at business level. SDG Target 13.3 | Improved education, awareness raising and human and institutional capacity on climate change mitigation, adaptation, impact reduction and early warning. We provide education throughout the company. Our 2021 Sustainability Summit featured presentations on our sustainability strategies regarding our product handprint and environmental footprint, the circular economy model, embodied carbon, healthy living strategies, inclusion and diversity ambitions and metrics, employee engagement, and safety. Partnerships for the Goals Collaboration within our supply chain is key to meeting our ambitious 2030 goals. It will require the participation of every stakeholder in our value chain, from suppliers to customers and end users, as well as policymakers, external researchers, and many others. SDG Target 17.3 | Mobilize additional financial resources for developing countries from multiple sources. In 2021, Owens Corning and the Owens Corning Foundation distributed over $5 million in cash contributions to nonprofit organizations. A portion of this funding was used for the OC Cares Fund, which is managed by an independent nonprofit. For details about our community engagement initiatives, please see our Community Engagement chapter. SDG Target 17.6 | Enhance North-South, South-South and triangular regional and international cooperation on and access to science, technology and innovation and enhance knowledge sharing on mutually agreed terms, including through improved coordination among existing mechanisms, in particular at the United Nations level, and through a global technology facilitation mechanism. SDG Target 17.16 | Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | UN SDG Alignment | 50 SDG Target 17.17 | Encourage and promote effective public, public-private and civil society partnerships, building on the experience and resourcing strategies of partnerships. As part of our work to combat climate change and advance sustainability, we increasingly engage with external parties with which we can leverage our expertise and our products. We have partnered with a wide range of trade organizations to expand our reach to consumers and industry professionals, providing us with a platform through which we can promote energy efficiency, renewable energy practices, and other best practices in corporate responsibility. We participate at the board level in many strategically relevant organizations, such as the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET), Building Performance Institute (BPI), National Association of Home Builders (NAHB), and Energy & Environmental Building Alliance (EEBA). Owens Corning employees also participate on committees and working groups in these organizations. As we support regulations aimed at the elimination of GHG emissions, we engage extensively with relevant policymakers. Our government affairs team coordinates these efforts and ensures that activities are aligned with our climate change policy. Our corporate affairs and sustainability departments regularly review proposed communications and activities. Owens Corning also actively partners with organizations that drive forward-thinking programs on a range of topics, including advanced standards for energy efficiency and the durability of buildings. This includes our membership in the Carbon Leadership Forum. One key partnership is Owens Corning’s participation in the ZEBRA (Zero WastE Blade ReseArch) project in Europe, a cross-sector consortium launched in 2020 to develop the first 100% recyclable wind turbine blade. A number of products have been manufactured with input from our Chambéry wind lab, including a new thermoplastic resin. In addition, testing is ongoing to identify resin-matrix interface properties that will deliver the optimal solution for our customers. Owens Corning has also been invited to participate and is engaging with another ongoing European consortium focused on deconstructing and recycling first generation wind turbine blades. These blades use thermoset resins which by design are more difficult to deconstruct and recycle. Owens Corning will be exploring options to rejuvenate recovered glass fibers from these processes or remelt in our production facilities which effectively converts unusable glass to new glass made from recycled content. The Better Plants Program, part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Initiative, is composed of over 250 companies that have adopted ambitious goals to conserve energy, reduce water usage, and cut waste. As the DOE seeks to significantly advance energy efficiency in commercial and industrial buildings across the country, they have created the Better Buildings Challenge, as well as its industrial counterpart, the Better Plants Challenge. Owens Corning was one of four companies to sign on to the Better Plants Challenge in 2020. Challenge partners join other industry and community leaders to create and share real solutions that reduce energy consumption, create jobs, and save money. The Challenge requires an additional commitment from partners to share their corporate data, solutions, and successes in the form of showcase projects and implementation models to help guide other industrial companies with implementing real-world energy solutions in their facilities. In return, partners gain enhanced recognition from the Department of Energy. Our Challenge Partner targets are as follows: ■ 28% energy efficiency improvement by 2030. ■ 15% water withdrawal intensity improvement by 2030. ■ Zero waste-to-landfill by 2030. To ensure uniformity with reporting, we will be using 2018 as our baseline for these targets. According to the Department of Energy, partners in this initiative have together saved more than $8 billion in cumulative energy costs and 1.7 quadrillion British thermal units (BTUs) since the program began. More information about these targets and their relevance to our overall sustainability goals can be found in their related chapters. THE BETTER PLANTS CHALLENGE Photo submitted by: Claudia Cantu | Houston, Texas, U.S. Darrell Flanagan, an operator at the Houston Roofing plant.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 51 BOARD LEADERSHIP In the sustainability world, we often discuss ESG impacts, which refer to three key elements of our approach — environmental, social, and governance. For the governance portion of this approach, we rely on our board of directors to provide essential leadership. The individuals who serve on our board share our commitment to reducing our negative impacts, increasing our positive impacts, and maintaining ethical standards, while also ensuring the growth of the company. NAME SIGNIFICANT POSITIONS & COMMITMENTS GENDER AGE INITIAL YEAR AS A DIRECTOR ROLE Mr. Brian Chambers President, CEO, and Chair of the Board for Owens Corning Male 55 2019 Executive Mr. Eduardo E. Cordeiro* Former Executive Vice President, CFO of Cabot Corporation, Director at FMC Corporation Male 54 2019 Independent Non-Executive Director Ms. Adrienne D. Elsner* Former President, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Charlotte’s Web Holding, Inc. Former President of U.S. Snacks, Kellogg Company Female 59 2018 Independent Non-Executive Director Mr. Alfred E. Festa Former Chairman and CEO, W.R. Grace & Company Male 62 2020 Independent Non-Executive Director Mr. Edward F. Lonergan Executive Chairman of Zep, Inc., Chairman of DRB Systems Inc, Former Director of The Schwan Food Company, Senior Advisor at New Mountain Capital Male 62 2013 Independent Non-Executive Director Ms. Maryann T. Mannen* Executive Vice President and CFO of Marathon Petroleum Corporation Female 59 2014 Independent Non-Executive Director Mr. Paul E. Martin* Former Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer for Baxter International Inc. Male 63 2021 Independent Non-Executive Director Mr. W. Howard Morris* President and Chief Investment Officer of The Prairie & Tireman Group Male 61 2007 Independent Non-Executive Director Ms. Suzanne P. Nimocks* Former Senior Partner of McKinsey & Company, Director of Ovintiv Inc, Valaris plc, and ArcelorMittal Female 63 2012 Independent Non-Executive Director Mr. John D. Williams President, CEO and Director of Domtar Corporation, Director of Form Technologies Male 67 2 011 Independent Non-Executive Director The Owens Corning Board of Directors Owens Corning’s board of directors consists of one executive director and nine independent non-executive directors. Of these 10 individuals, three are people of color and three are female. Those board members are noted with an asterisk (*) below.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 52 The board has five committees: ■ Audit committee. ■ Compensation committee. ■ Executive committee. ■ Finance committee. ■ Governance and nominating committee. Information about these committees and their responsibilities can be found in the Board and Committee Membership section of our 2022 Proxy Statement and on the Owens Corning website. Current Leadership Structure Brian D. Chambers assumed the chief executive role in April 2019, and became board chair in April 2020. In April 2021, Suzanne P. Nimocks began a two-year term as lead independent director. The board of directors has complete access to the company’s management, with an ongoing ability to review the board’s leadership structure and make changes as it deems necessary and appropriate. This gives them the flexibility to meet varying business, personnel, and organizational needs over time. All board members, other than our board chair and CEO, are independent under all applicable legal, regulatory, and stock exchange requirements. Six board members have relevant experience in industrials and materials sectors where our products are sold. Average tenure on the board is currently six years. The board believes that the current and future leadership structure is appropriate for Owens Corning considering our company’s governance structure, current needs, and business environment, as well as the unique talents, experiences, and attributes of the individuals in these roles. More information about the individual board members and their competencies can be found in our most recent Proxy Statement. The board of directors met five times in 2021. Board and board committee meetings had attendance rates of 99%. Each of our directors attended at least 75% of the meetings of the board and the board committees on which he or she served. In 2021, the non-management directors met in executive session five times. Our lead independent director (LID) presides over all executive sessions of the board meetings attended by the LID. Nomination and Selection of Qualified Board Members The board of directors is responsible for nominating candidates to the board, who are then elected by stockholders. They also fill vacancies that may occur between annual meetings of stockholders. Owens Corning has formal procedures in place for the nomination and selection of potential board members. The governance and nominating committee is authorized to recommend only those candidates who meet our Director Qualification Standards. For a company director to be considered independent, the board of directors must affirm that the individual has no direct or indirect relationship with the company other than as director. Nominees for director are selected based on a wide range of criteria, including: ■ Experience. ■ Knowledge. ■ Skills. ■ Expertise. ■ Mature judgment. ■ Acumen. ■ Character. ■ Integrity. ■ Diversity. ■ The ability to make analytical inquiries. ■ Understanding of the company’s business environment. ■ Willingness to devote adequate time and effort to board responsibilities. As outlined in our bylaws, each board member is elected individually on an annual basis and must receive the majority of the votes. All our current non-executive directors have no more than four additional mandates to public boards, as required by our qualification standards. The governance and nominating committee examines principal skills to evaluate the director’s experience and qualifications to serve as director. With respect to sustainability, the committee assesses experience in or management responsibility for furthering sustainable business practices that address environmental, social, or ethical issues. Nine of our current board members demonstrate this skill. Because we believe diversity enhances the board’s ability to manage and direct the company, the committee considers diversity when identifying director nominees, as required by its charter and corporate governance guidelines. In this context, diversity refers to gender, race, ethnicity, nationality, national origin, or other elements of an individual’s identity. The effectiveness of this process is assessed annually by the full board as part of its self-evaluation process.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 53 Management Oversight of Sustainability According to our Directors’ Code of Conduct, sustainability includes the following concepts: ■ Environmental compliance. ■ Product stewardship. ■ Personal safety. ■ The environmental and social impacts of our global operations and the products we make and sell. Both the audit committee and the board of directors as a whole retain some oversight responsibility for environmental, health and safety risks. Directors are expected to provide oversight, guidance, and direction on sustainability issues and opportunities that potentially impact our reputation and long-term economic viability. These sustainability issues include energy reduction, renewable energy, water scarcity, and waste reduction. We have a sustainability governance structure to discuss and make decisions on all issues related to economic, environmental, and social aspects. Because the board of directors is responsible for overseeing risk for Owens Corning, they are also responsible for oversight of climate-related issues and opportunities. According to the Audit Committee Charter: ■ The committee is responsible to review the impact of significant regulatory changes, proposed regulatory changes and accounting or reporting developments, including significant reporting developments related to the principles of sustainability. More information about risk oversight can be found in the Risk section of this report. Owens Corning created the chief sustainability officer (CSO) role in 2007 to underscore the essential role sustainability plays in our overall operations. The CSO reports directly to the CEO and is responsible for our compliance with legal and company requirements related to environmental, safety, health, and sustainability. In addition, a sustainability organization, made up of approximately 50 employees, reports to the CSO. This team is accountable for circular economy, product stewardship, supply chain sustainability, sustainability and reporting analytics, operations sustainability, medical, and EHS (environmental, health, and safety). Vision and values related to sustainability are created by the CEO and the CSO. They also create, maintain, and promote sustainability strategy and policies, and they redefine targets and goals as needed. The CSO and his organization are responsible for monitoring and reporting performance. Our environmental metrics and data are monitored using the EcoStruxure™ Resource Advisor system from Schneider Electric. Data is entered into the system, where it can be reviewed and analyzed. The sustainability leadership team meets regularly to: ■ Review initiatives and performance against metrics. ■ Debate current trends in the market. ■ Evaluate the transparency of our product attributes and the level of information needed to satisfy customers. ■ Understand increasing stakeholder expectations. Climate-related issues are addressed through our risk management process and included in our risk registers, which are developed by the business and legal teams from the plant level up. Oversight of sustainability — including all elements of our 2030 sustainability goals — lies with the board of directors. In addition, our audit committee has oversight responsibilities for Environmental, Health, and Safety. OVERSIGHT OF SUSTAINABILITY SUSTAINABILITY ORGANIZATION Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) Sustainability Champions EH&S Leadership Council, which includes: • Chief Sustainability Officer (executive sponsor) • Enterprise Environmental • Enterprise Safety • Enterprise Medical, Health • Insulation, Director – EHS • Roofing, Director – EHS • Composites, Director – EHS • Regulatory Law Sustainability Leadership Team Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Board of Directors ROLES • Creating sustainability vision, values • Sustainability strategy and policies • Redefining targets or goals • Performance monitoring and reporting ROLES • Reports on delivery of goals and targets ROLES • Oversight responsibility for EHS risks • Guidance and direction on sustainability issues and opportunities

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 54 Photo submitted by: Danyelle Lynne Phelps | Granville, Ohio, U.S. The carpenter bee, a valuable pollinator in the ecosystem. Board Education New directors undergo an orientation program covering a wide range of topics, including strategic plans and significant issues related to finance, accounting, and risk management issues to ensure they are fully knowledgeable about our company. They also review compliance programs, conflict policies, codes of business conduct and ethics, and governance guidelines. The orientation also includes opportunities to familiarize themselves with principal officers, internal auditors, and independent auditors, as well as receive briefings from the CEO and management. Following the orientation process, directors are expected to continue learning about our business and related issues, so they maintain the necessary expertise and competency to perform their responsibilities as directors. This continued learning includes consultations with our executive officers, reviewing relevant materials, visiting offices and plants, and participating in third-party educational programs. The governance and nominating committee also receives periodic updates on environmental, social, and governance issues. Board and Committee Evaluation Our corporate governance guidelines specify that each year, the governance and nominating committee evaluates the effectiveness of the board, its five committees, the chair and CEO, and committee charters. The evaluation process is as follows: ■ The board and its committees complete annual self-assessment questionnaires and have individual discussions with the lead independent director to evaluate effectiveness in several areas, including board composition, structure, and process. ■ The completed questionnaires are submitted directly to a third-party law firm, which summarizes the results. ■ The governance and nominating committee circulates the summarized results to all directors, except for results related to evaluation of the chair and CEO. Those are sent to the independent directors, to be discussed in an executive session of the non- management directors. Conflicts of Interest We have written policies and procedures in place related to avoiding, managing, and disclosing conflicts of interest by directors, officers, employees, and members of their immediate families. As indicated in our Directors’ Code of Conduct, a director who has an actual or potential conflict of interest must disclose the following to the chair of the board and the chair of the governance and nominating committee: ■ The existence and nature of the actual or potential conflict of interest. ■ All facts known to him or her regarding the transaction that may be material to a judgment about whether to proceed with the transaction. The director may proceed with the transaction only after receiving approval from the governance and nominating committee. In our annual proxy statement, we disclose transactions between board members and their immediate families. For related-party transactions (RPTs) that are subject to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) Topic 850, we comply with additional disclosure requirements. We also disclose with suppliers and other stakeholders all other conflicts of interest, such as the existence of controlling shareholders, cross-board membership, and cross-sharing.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 55 Photo submitted by: Douglas Gremel | Sward, Nebraska, U.S. A view from the front porch, featuring the deck, lawn, and the sky reflected in the glass top of the porch furniture. Executive Compensation Owens Corning continually monitors the evolution of compensation best practices, as we review the relationship between company performance and compensation and the goals and targets we set. Individual goals and targets are designed to ensure that Owens Corning meets its financial and environmental goals while operating as an ethical company. In addition, Owens Corning has a fully non-executive compensation committee made up of all independent members. Our CEO and our named executive officers (NEOs) have substantial “pay at risk,” with 85% of our CEO’s and 74% of our NEOs’ target compensation being tied to annual and long-term incentives (as opposed to base salaries). Actual annual incentives and long-term incentive awards are subject to the achievement of preestablished performance requirements and designed to align with stockholder value. Base salary and other fixed elements of compensation are essential to any compensation program and enable the recruitment and retention of top talent. However, we believe that variable compensation for our most senior executives should significantly outweigh base salaries. For a more detailed discussion of executive compensation, including ways we apply internal and external financial success metrics, please see the Ex ecutive Compensation section of our latest Proxy Statement , published in March 2022. Stakeholder Consultation and Communication To better understand our stakeholders’ expectations and priorities, we proactively engage and consult with individuals, groups, and organizations that are impacted by our business operations. We rely on stakeholder guidance and direction to choose our business strategies and priorities, and from them we learn what is and is not working. We invite stakeholders to communicate with us on any economic, environmental, or social topic related to our business. The collective stakeholder input is crucial to the board’s fulfillment of its duties and responsibilities. It directly informs the board’s identification and management of economic, environmental, and social matters and their impacts, risks, and opportunities. We also invite all our stockholders and other interested parties to communicate with our board on any critical concerns they might have about our business. Interested parties may communicate with the lead independent director or any other non-management director by sending an email to [email protected]. All such communications are promptly reviewed for evaluation and appropriate follow-up by our general counsel and/or our vice president, internal audit. A summary of all communications is reported to the non-management directors. This does not include communications considered to be advertisements or other types of “spam” or “junk” messages unrelated to the board’s duties or responsibilities, which are discarded without further action. In addition, stakeholders and other interested parties may communicate sustainability concerns with the senior vice president and chief sustainability officer (CSO) via his email address, his assistant, our sustainability email address, or telephone. All business-appropriate inquiries are handled by the CSO directly, or they are passed on to corporate communications, legal, or other company function for appropriate action or response. Communications alleging fraud or serious misconduct by directors or executive officers are immediately reported to the lead independent director. Complaints regarding business conduct policies, corporate governance matters, accounting controls, or auditing are managed and reported in accordance with Owens Corning’s existing audit committee complaint policy or business conduct complaint procedure, as appropriate.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Board Leadership | 56 GOING FORWARD Achieving our sustainability goals requires a concerted effort on the part of everyone at Owens Corning, and we are proud that these efforts are supported by the individuals who make up our board of directors. They have provided steadfast guidance throughout our sustainability journey, and their leadership and dedication give us added confidence as we look ahead to 2030. Photo submitted by: Amanda Meehan | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. Japanese maple leaves.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 57 RISK MANAGEMENT In this chapter: ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ SUMMARY OF KEY RISKS ƒ GOING FORWARD Owens Corning recognizes the need to assess and manage risk as an essential part of our ESG (environmental, social, and governance) responsibilities. By identifying risks across all aspects of our operations, we can proactively manage the risks that are directly related to sustainability. In this section, we describe the structures Owens Corning has in place to manage risk, as well as the specific risks that we anticipate over coming years. This includes risks that are specific to our sustainability efforts. Photo submitted by: Ron Barten | Tessenderlo, Belgium Personal protective equipment used at the Tessenderlo plant.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 58 OUR APPROACH Oversight and Management Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) is owned by the executive committee, who delegates its management to the risk committee. The executive committee then monitors the risk committee’s management of ERM, culminating in a final review by the audit committee of the board. The risk committee is responsible for overseeing and monitoring our risk assessment and mitigation actions. The risk committee is not a board committee; instead, it is a cross- functional committee that includes members across many areas of expertise. It is also structurally independent of our business lines. This internal group identifies risks and mitigation strategies, and it provides key updates to executive officers and the audit committee. In 2020, the risk committee’s membership was amended to ensure greater diversity of thought related to risk, including more functions and expanded geographic representation. Members from corporate functions include internal audit, legal, treasury, corporate strategy and financial planning, sourcing and supply chain, and IT. They were joined by individuals representing operations, human resources, commercial strategy, and science and technology within the businesses. In addition, safety and environmental concerns were expanded in the core risk register, which increases the extent to which sustainability issues are embedded into the enterprise-wide risk process. The risk committee reports to the executive committee, and it is specifically sponsored by both the chief financial officer and general counsel, who are themselves members of the executive committee. In support of these efforts, the independent corporate audit function systematically addresses risk throughout the organization. Audit results are reviewed with the audit committee of the board of directors, which has primary responsibility for assisting the board’s oversight of risk. The audit committee’s responsibilities include: ■ Discussion of guidelines and policies that govern the process by which senior management and relevant departments access and manage the company’s exposure to risk. ■ Annual review of, and quarterly updates on, identification of Owens Corning’s key risks, major financial exposures, and related mitigation plans. ■ Oversight of our management of the key risks and major financial exposures that fall within the audit committee’s specific purview. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland A Paroc employee inspects plant machinery. ■ Assurance that the board and its committees oversee our management’s key risks and major financial exposures within their respective purviews. ■ Quarterly evaluation of the effectiveness of the above- referenced process of oversight. In addition to the ERM process, three board committees — compensation, finance, and governance and nominating — review and evaluate risks associated with their respective areas. Each board committee reports on its respective risk management activities to the board, and the board then considers such reports. Between annual reviews, the registers are reviewed by the business stakeholders, and the risk committee meets quarterly to discuss any applicable updates. The risk registers are also reviewed quarterly by both the audit committee and the executive committee, regardless of any planned updates, to ensure that no risks are missed by the risk committee. Should any material updates be made, these are then reviewed with the executive committee and audit committee of the board as well. Owens Corning identifies and manages risk across economic, environmental, and social domains. Our forward-thinking, holistic approach to managing risk enables us to make effective business decisions that help us build long- term financial goals and shape our future success.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 59 Risk Registers Owens Corning’s business units proactively analyze risks and create business- and function-specific risk registers. We currently have an enterprise risk register and sub-registers for each of our three businesses, as well as compliance and finance. The risk committee uses these individual risk registers to create an enterprise risk register, which enables business units and the risk committee to facilitate strategic and operational planning processes while mitigating sustainability and other risks. Risks are prioritized based on their placement in the risk register. The Y-axis (“Value”) represents the potential financial impact, while the X-axis (“Likelihood”) represents the probability of occurrence. Color coding (for risk acceptability) and different shapes (for trending information) offer a fuller understanding of the potential risks. In 2021, we added the concept of risk velocity to our conceptualization of risk, describing the potential rate at which a risk could impact our businesses. While risk velocity is not depicted on the risk register in an infographic manner, the concept is described in conjunction with the overall register narrative. By incorporating the idea of risk velocity into our understanding of risk, we gain a better understanding impending impacts, which enables us to be proactive in our approach. To identify new risks — and update risks no longer considered important — the risk committee conducts quarterly reviews of results and outputs of risk assessments. The risk committee’s quarterly meetings enable them to review and report on robust mitigation plans across businesses as well as corporate functions. Our ERM process is also reviewed quarterly by the audit committee of the board to ensure it remains relevant and proactive. Risk on a Page Owens Corning encourages active learning through risk mapping, and in 2020 we implemented a new tool called Risk on a Page. The new model requires each risk to be presented separately, with dedicated team members playing an active role in managing each individual risk. The tool is used to describe key information about the risk such as risk trend, risk velocity, mitigating actions, and its link to strategic plan. It also includes a map of the risk that depicts its status, from Inherent Risk to Residual Risk, to pictorially represent the impact of mitigating actions, as well as the final mitigated position of the risk for the sub-register or enterprise register. Each risk has two sponsors, one from the risk committee and one from the executive committee, and each risk has its own risk owner and subject matter expert. The subject matter expert and risk owner are responsible for ensuring we have mitigating actions in place for each risk, and that there is consistent progress being made toward mitigation. Risk owners are responsible for the overall management of the risk and communicating cross- functionally and vertically through the organization, ensuring visibility of the risk in all elements of strategic planning. This approach enables us to drive updates to the risk register, as sub-register risks roll up to the enterprise level. The implementation of the tool required extra training in 2020, which will be refreshed for new stakeholders each year. VALUE IMPACT HIGH MEDIUM LOW LOW MEDIUM HIGH T A B M G U R P N I H K J O L E C S Q F LIKELIHOOD TREND ▲ Improving ● Stable ▼ Worsening RISK ACCEPTABILITY (after the impact of existing actions) ■ Risk level acceptable ■ Execution of management plan ■ Management of risk needs improvement No Change New Risk Change LEGEND Example of a risk register for demonstration purposes.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 60 Risk Mitigation Framework Risk Management Training Our enterprise risk management function (and philosophy) is dispersed throughout the organization at all levels, and we ensure that risk registers are updated through risk liaisons. Each sub-register has a risk liaison, who is responsible for facilitating updates to their respective sub-register. Risk liaisons receive thorough training from the corporate risk leader, and they then go on to train subject matter experts and risk owners in their respective businesses or corporate areas. As part of this process, individuals are trained in our approach to Enterprise Risk Management. Additionally, the legal department initiates annual training on our Business Code of Conduct and antitrust policies globally to broadly address key compliance risks. Each business is required to complete strategic planning, covering risk management and strategic risk. Owens Corning conducts regular and ongoing risk management training for personnel in the risk committee and risk functions, including sourcing and finance globally. Risk Management and Human Resources Effective risk management is considered in our human resources (HR) processes for employees who are responsible for identifying and continually progressing mitigation strategies for risks in their daily job responsibilities. This is evidenced by our risk management process, which includes development of risk registers at the enterprise level, business unit level, and corporate function level. In support of our efforts to reduce risk in HR, Owens Corning has implemented an executive committee review, which details talent health, leadership succession, hiring and developing capabilities, retention, and inclusion and diversity progress. Engaging Employees in Risk Management Many employees are involved in risk identification, as we encourage them to identify new risks to the organization through questionnaires, interviews, and the regular update of the business and enterprise risk registers. During these reviews, employees are given a forum to provide feedback. Potential risks regarding such items as sourcing, safety, environmental, and HR are raised at the plant level, and their learnings are shared across the company and are evaluated at the leadership team level in each facility; when appropriate, they are compiled into the business unit-level risk register. Once within the risk register, processes are established and appropriate employees are trained. There is also focused web-based loss-control training available for plant personnel. In keeping with our culture of safety, employees are encouraged to be proactive in their management of risk. An example of this can be found in our integration of Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) into our operations. TPM emphasizes proactive and preventive activities to maintain, operate, and improve production. All employees are involved in maintaining their own process during production, which creates a shared responsibility for equipment and increases involvement from everyone. In addition, hazard recognition and near-miss reporting are significant tools within our safety culture and throughout the plant network. Employees are encouraged to report their concerns to any manager, member of human resources or legal operations, or any member of our business conduct council (BCC). Employees may also submit their concerns (anonymously) to our BCC through a confidential helpline (1-800-461-9330) or web portal, operated by a third-party service provider. Employees can also report their concerns to the council using a designated email ([email protected]) address or a dedicated postal mailbox. Key executives are also engaged to review areas of risk, as they are interviewed each year by our internal audit team as they develop an audit plan. In 2020, we began to integrate this with our ERM. Each quarter, the three businesses, finance, and compliance refresh their risk registers and identifies any new or materially changed risks and how they relate to the strategic plan. This emphasis on risk also extends to new acquisitions. As part of our due diligence in the acquisition process, we evaluate the risk for items such as environment, safety, financial, IT, product stewardship, HR, and sourcing. For example, the process for safety includes leading indicator analysis and injury review calls, where each facility that has a “high-risk” first aid or injury incident shares best practices. IDENTIFYING RISKS PRIORITIZING RISKS ALIGNING AND REVIEWING MITIGATION PLAN

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 61 SUMMARY OF KEY RISKS Owens Corning is subject to a diverse array of risks, which vary greatly in importance and likelihood. Some are directly related to the competitive nature of our business and our operations, while others are the result of external forces, including weather-related phenomena. Using correlation analysis, we assess the likelihood of an event occurring within a specific period, then prioritize and develop strategic plans accordingly. We apply this analysis to our key external business drivers, such as housing starts, hurricanes and other severe weather conditions, and wind-power growth rates. For example, our analysis indicates that the North American building insulation business is highly correlated to new home starts. Based on actual and forecasted home starts, the business develops its strategic plan and makes the appropriate tactical maneuvers to right-size our capacity and workforce. Additionally, energy, commodity, and foreign currency hedging programs are routinely evaluated to provide inputs into our correlation analysis. Sustainability Risks For purposes of this report, we recognize the need to highlight potential risks that are specific to our sustainability efforts. In addition, we believe it is important for investors to understand the emerging long-term risks that we may face in the future. Both the board of directors and its audit committee retain some oversight responsibility for environmental, health, and safety risks. In addition, directors are expected to provide oversight, guidance, and direction on sustainability issues and opportunities that have potential impact on our reputation and long-term economic viability. The following risks are also relevant to our sustainability efforts as outlined in this report: Emerging Risks Climate Change and Associated Weather Conditions While the science behind climate change has been clear for a long time, the gravity of the situation is becoming increasingly apparent. The world is recognizing the need to act quickly and decisively to mitigate the emerging risks that climate change poses for the safety, health, and economic well-being of people everywhere. Given our understanding of the physical risks associated with climate change, Owens Corning has set targets aligned with the latest findings from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). To avoid the worst impacts of climate change, the IPCC urges that temperature rise should be held below 1.5° C. Informed by this latest climate science information, we seek to reduce our Scope 1 and Scope 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030, and our Scope 3 emissions by 30%. The Science Based Targets initiative has verified that Owens Corning’s greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals align to this standard. Owens Corning continues to assess all the potential risks associated with climate change to gain a fuller understanding of the many ways that climate-related risks can impact operations across our entire value chain. As weather conditions shift, severe storms can have a significant impact on the markets for residential and commercial construction, repair and improvement, as well as a material adverse impact on our results of operations. Among our customers, severe weather conditions could slow or limit residential or commercial construction activity, which in turn could adversely affect demand for our products. Within our own operations, extreme weather can lead to disruptions in our manufacturing capacities, as damages to our facilities may occur. In addition, as weather-based disruptions become more common, we could experience difficulties in obtaining affordable insurance. Adverse weather conditions can also have a negative impact on our suppliers, hindering our ability to obtain the materials needed to maintain our own operations. Climate Change and Associated Transitional Risks Owens Corning is subject to or has chosen to voluntarily participate in Emissions Trading Schemes (ETS) around the world, such as the Alberta Technology Innovation and Emissions Reduction, EU Emissions Trading System, California’s Cap-and-Trade system, the Canadian Federal Output-Based Pricing System, the Québec Cap-and-Trade system, and South Korea’s Emissions Trading Scheme. Expansions to these schemes could impact us by reducing our carbon allowances, thus increasing our operating costs in those countries. With the further reductions in allowances through Phase 4 of the European Union ETS, for example, we forecast that our allowances will be depleted after 2021, which will require us to begin purchasing credits. Phase 4 applies to the period 2021-2030. Volatility in carbon market pricing creates additional risk. Our course of action in managing these risks involves: interacting with the commission regarding the implementation of the EU Green Deal and Fit-for-55 package; pursuit of R&D initiatives involving a change in material composition or in manufacturing processes to enable emissions reductions; and implementation of energy and GHG reduction projects.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 62 We also anticipate transitional risks as climate-change legislation and other environmental mandates lead to increases in energy prices. This can have an adverse effect on our operations, as it can represent a cost increase that we may not be able to pass along to the customer. Owens Corning has strategies in place to mitigate these risks. Chief among them is our commitment to the circular economy model, in which we work to avoid the use of virgin raw materials whenever possible, manufacture products to deliver the least negative environmental impact, and ensure that materials used in our products and packaging remain in the economy indefinitely. Our Circular Economy chapter in this report describes our commitment to this model in greater detail. In consultation with experts in the field, Owens Corning began work with The Ohio State University in 2020 to expand our efforts to assess the resilience of our strategies against a range of climate-related scenarios and time horizons. These scenarios will focus on risks and opportunities globally and at the business level. For further discussion of our climate change risks, our management of those risks, and related opportunities, please see our CDP Climate Change 2022 Report, which will be posted on the Owens Corning website later this year. More information related to this topic is also presented in the TCFD climate risk discussion in Appendix G. Loss of Highly Skilled Personnel Owens Corning depends on our senior management team and other skilled and experienced personnel to operate our business effectively. These individuals possess skills in many areas that are important to the operation of our business, sales, marketing, manufacturing, logistical, financial, business strategy, and administrative skills. The loss of any of these individuals or the failure to attract additional personnel could adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations. This is especially true as we seek to address potential staffing losses at our Science & Technology Centers, where we rely on individuals with very specific knowledge. Our technical staff brings an in-depth knowledge of our products, our processes, and our industry — knowledge that is essential to our ability to innovate — and replacing them when they retire presents significant challenges. The loss of any of these individuals or an inability to attract additional personnel could prevent us from implementing our business strategy and could adversely impact our business and our future financial condition or results of operations. Owens Corning considers this a long-term emerging risk as many of these existing senior management personnel and skilled and experienced personnel will be at retirement age in the next 3-5 years. We are working to mitigate this risk through phased retirement, which helps create a smooth transition for employees as they retire. This includes a program through which employees nearing retirement are given the opportunity to work parttime while still receiving full-time benefits. As employees prepare for retirement, they can pass along their insights and expertise, helping ensure that Owens Corning has the opportunity to continue moving forward with minimal disruption. Additional Risks Our 2021 Annual Report on Form 10-K offers an in-depth discussion of our quantitative and qualitative risks, as well as our approach for managing them. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic may exacerbate the risks discussed in this section. The impact depends on the severity and duration of the current COVID-19 pandemic and actions taken by governmental authorities and other third parties in response, each of which is uncertain, changing, and difficult to predict. Some of the key risks that directly impact our operations include the following: 1. Low levels of residential, commercial, or industrial construction activity, which can have a material adverse impact on our business and results of operations. 2. Significant competition in the markets we serve, against which we may not be able to compete successfully. 3. Rapid fall in sales due to declines in demand. This can occur because we do not operate under long-term volume agreements to supply our customers and because of customer concentration in certain segments. 4. Worldwide economic conditions and credit tightening, which could have a material adverse impact on the company. 5. Risks associated with our international operations. 6. Natural disasters, catastrophes, pandemics, theft, or sabotage, against which we may not be adequately insured, or which may cause serious harm. 7. Climate change, adverse weather conditions, and the level of severe storms, which could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. 8. Cost increases or reduced availability of energy, materials, or transportation. This could reduce our margins and have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results or operations. 9. Risks associated with our efforts in acquiring and integrating other businesses, establishing joint ventures, expanding our production capacity, or divesting assets.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 63 10. Potential product liability and warranty claims, for which we may not accurately estimate related costs, or we may not have sufficient insurance coverage available to cover such claims. 11. Uninsured judgments or a rise in insurance premiums. This may adversely impact our business, financial condition, and results of operations, as we are subject to various legal and regulatory proceedings, including litigation in ordinary course of business. 12. Potentially substantial expenditures related to our liability under and compliance with environmental and emerging product-based laws and regulations. 13. Failure of our intellectual property rights to provide meaningful commercial protection for our products or brands. This could enable third parties to assert that we violate their intellectual property rights, which could adversely impact our business, financial condition, and results of operations. 14. Our level of indebtedness. This could adversely affect our business, financial condition, or results of operations. 15. Downgrades of our credit ratings. 16. If we were required to write down all or part of our goodwill or other indefinite-lived intangible assets, our results of operations or financial condition could be materially adversely affected in a particular period. 17. Ongoing efforts to increase productivity and reduce costs. These may not result in anticipated savings. 18. High levels of fixed costs. This would be incurred regardless of our level of business activity, given that our operations require substantial capital. 19. Failure of hedging activities to address energy price fluctuations to offset increases in those costs or potentially reducing or eliminating the benefits of any decreases in those costs. 20. Price volatility in certain wind-generated U.S. energy markets. 21. Increases in the cost of labor, union organizing activity, labor disputes, and work stoppages at our facilities. This could delay or impede our production, reduce sales of our products, and increase our costs. 22. Significant changes in the factors and assumptions used to measure our defined benefit plan obligations, actual investment returns on pensions assets, and other factors. This could have a negative impact on our financial condition or liquidity. 23. Failure to adequately protect our critical information technology systems. This could materially affect our operations. Risks at Owens Corning, regardless of their relation to sustainability, are addressed through our ERM program. Each business fluidly reviews its risk register to identify new or materially changed risks and address them accordingly with appropriate risk mitigation plans. Opportunities are addressed through the long-range planning process, which has a horizon of three years forward. Retirement Benefits Liabilities We are committed to providing all employees with comprehensive retirement benefits. Generally, we offer these benefits via defined contribution arrangements. However, defined benefit plans may be provided in accordance with local custom to ensure a competitive overall benefits package. Of our defined benefit obligations, 98% are payable through a fund held and maintained separately from the resources of the organization. The Canadian qualified plan is 113% funded, as determined by actuarial valuation within the past 12 months. The U.S. and the U.K. plans are less than 100% funded, also based on actuarial valuation within the past 12 months. These three plans represent 98% of the company’s defined benefit liabilities. Our strategy for the U.S. plan is to contribute at least the minimum required amount each year and ensure that the plan is funded at 80% or greater. Other plans are funded to fully comply with local requirements. Approximately 96% of eligible U.S. employees participate in voluntary retirement savings (defined contribution) programs. Owens Corning provides an automatic 2% contribution based on salary to all U.S. employees’ 401(k) plans. The company also matches up to 6% based on individual contributions; thus, employees who maximize the company match will save 14% of salary toward retirement. New U.S. hires are automatically enrolled in our 401(k) plan. Our 401(k) plan represents approximately 93% of our contributory savings plan globally.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 64 Cybersecurity Risk Owens Corning is subject to risks relating to our information technology systems, and any failure to adequately protect our critical information technology systems could materially affect our operations. We rely on information technology systems across our operations, including for management, supply chain and financial information, and various other processes and transactions. Our ability to effectively manage our business depends on the security, reliability, and capacity of these systems. Information technology system failures, network disruptions, or breaches of security could disrupt our operations, causing delays or cancellation of customer orders or impeding the manufacture or shipment of products, processing of transactions, or reporting of financial results. An attack or other problem with our systems could also result in the disclosure of proprietary information about our business or confidential information concerning our customers or employees, which could result in significant damage to our business and our reputation. We have put in place security measures designed to protect against the misappropriation or corruption of our systems, intentional or unintentional disclosure of confidential information, or disruption of our operations. However, advanced cybersecurity threats, such as malware, ransomware, phishing attacks, attempts to access information, and other security breaches are persistent and continue to evolve, making them increasingly difficult to identify and prevent. Protecting against these threats may require significant resources, and we may not be able to implement measures that will protect against all the significant risks to our information technology systems. In addition, we rely on a number of third-party service providers to execute certain business processes and maintain certain information technology systems and infrastructure, and any breach of security on their part could impair our ability to effectively operate. Moreover, our operations in certain geographic locations may be particularly vulnerable to security attacks or other problems. Any breach of our security measures could result in unauthorized access to and misappropriation of our information, corruption of data, or disruption of operations or transactions, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business. We have established a range of security measures to protect against these concerns. We have implemented additional controls, security processes, and monitoring of our manufacturing systems. We have also implemented additional cloud security tools and governance processes. We rely on third-party service providers to execute certain business processes, maintain certain IT systems and infrastructure, evaluate defenses, and implement recommendations. Moreover, our operations in certain geographic locations may be particularly vulnerable to security attacks or other problems. To combat this, we have added global information security team members to address regional security issues. We also placed great emphasis on cyber risk associated with merger and acquisition activities. The board of directors’ audit committee is responsible for overseeing the cybersecurity strategy for the company. Maryann T. Mannen is the chair of the audit committee. Our chief information officer oversees cybersecurity for the company and provides updates on cybersecurity risks to the board of directors’ audit committee regularly. Audit committee member Paul Martin has more than 10 years’ experience as chief information officer at another company, and his expertise includes oversight of cybersecurity. The audit committee reviews how we are executing against its comprehensive cybersecurity framework. Regularly, the audit committee may receive updates on efforts regarding data loss prevention, regulatory compliance, data privacy, threat and vulnerability management, cyber-crisis management, or other topics as applicable. Risks Related to Child Labor and Forced Labor Owens Corning’s human rights policy states that we do not and will not employ child labor or forced, slave, convict, or bonded labor. In addition, Owens Corning will not knowingly engage a supplier or distributor, nor will we enter into a joint venture with an organization that directly or indirectly, through a third party, employs child labor, forced labor, or persons who were trafficked into employment. The Human Rights & Ethics chapter of this report offers further details. Owens Corning supports participation in legitimate workplace apprenticeship programs, provided they comply with all applicable laws and are consistent with Articles 6 and 7 of the International Labour Organization (ILO) Minimum Age Convention No. 138 on vocational or technical education and light work.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Risk Management | 65 GOING FORWARD In 2021, for the first time, Owens Corning took measures to further integrate risk into our strategic plan, working with the Strategic Growth Council to assess risks that might be upcoming and completing a mapping exercise to ensure that all risks are appropriately accounted for. Through these efforts, which will be conducted annually in years to come, we will be better equipped to address risks throughout the enterprise. The world of 2030 will look very different from our current world, and new risks are certain to emerge. With the robust risk management structures that we have in place, from oversight on the part of our board of directors to newer tools such as Risk on a Page, we believe we will be prepared to face them — and achieve our sustainability goals. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Digital Transformation | 66 DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION In this chapter: ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ GOING FORWARD Our commitment to innovation extends beyond our portfolio of products to include our entire approach to business. We continue to look for ways to drive efficiency and deliver sustainability — and breakthroughs in the digital space are providing us with the tools needed to accomplish an incredible array of goals. Digital innovations have helped us optimize our operations, helped our customers and contractors grow, and made it easier for our employees across the globe to collaborate efficiently and effectively. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Digital Transformation | 67 Owens Corning’s digital framework is built to address some of our key aspirations, including the following: Improving manufacturing Through analytics and modeling, we are optimizing our manufacturing operations, and digital technologies are enabling us to integrate engineering data with manufacturing science, automation, and controls, so we can design and build plants more efficiently. Driving efficiency Digital tools are transforming the workplace, enabling us to organize work and collaborate better while communicating thoughts, ideas, and interactions between our employees and stakeholders, as well as facilitating the analysis of large and diverse data sets. Generating revenue Our market-facing initiatives include the use of digital marketing channels, engagement systems, and e-commerce tools. These digital tools and solutions drive awareness of our products, increase brand loyalty and advocacy, and support the e-commerce momentum in the industry — while also helping our customers, contractors, and influencers grow their businesses. OUR APPROACH Photo submitted by: Jill Ries | Granville, Ohio, U.S. At the Owens Corning Science & Technology Center in Granville.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Digital Transformation | 68 Market-Facing Digital Initiatives Across our operations, we continue to discover areas where digital innovations can help us meet our goals for both sustainability and growth. As we continue to explore new avenues, we also find that we are increasing efficiencies and shaping our business for the better. DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION INITIATIVES Owens Corning has developed a number of digital tools and solutions to help our customers, contractors, and influencers grow. Some examples include: Distributors: As we work to grow online with our distributors, we have developed a portal to offer order status, access to documents, and delivery tracking. Contractors: The goal with contractors is to help them get more work — and get more work done. The OC Connect platform helps contractors get information and training and allows them to earn rewards for their purchases. Architects / Specifiers: The digital tools we are developing are designed to provide accurate information about Owens Corning products and make them the easiest to spec into projects and systems, helping us become the manufacturer of choice in the markets we serve. Homeowners: Digital marketing strategies enable us to guide the homeowner through the entire purchasing journey, from initial interest to acting as an advocate for Owens Corning ® products. We have created digital tools to support each stage of the buying process, from pre-shopping to advocacy. Digital Initiatives in Manufacturing In manufacturing, we are using proven digital technologies to design, construct, and operate our manufacturing assets more efficiently in service to our customers. We are working to accelerate the digital transformation of our manufacturing operations by focusing on the following: Digital Engineering We’re looking at how we design and build better and more efficiently, integrating models and engineering data with construction science for capital efficiency. To achieve this, we are using model-based design, cost estimation and controls technologies, modular construction, and life cycle costing to provide critical insights into our design/build processes. Digital Process and Automation Integrating data and science with automation and controls to free capacity, drive quality, and lower cost helps us operate more efficiently. Initiatives such as robotics and automation, asset performance management, advanced process controls, and remote collaboration are giving us the tools needed to reach our goals. Analytics and Modeling We’re combining our capabilities with the latest in modeling science to optimize our designs and operations. Through advanced analytics, process modeling, predictive maintenance, and real-time optimization, we’re disrupting the current operating models and consistently moving forward. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Digital Transformation | 69 Digital Worker Initiatives Through our Digital Worker initiatives, we aspire to build an efficient, frictionless, and cohesive work experience for our employees. Digital hubs for each initiative will enable employees to collaborate and connect anywhere, anytime, as they serve our customers and deliver successful outcomes. Through precise, thoughtful, and structured transformational initiatives, we strive to improve the collaboration capabilities in multiple areas of our company. These initiatives are focused on how we collaborate in the context of our customers, our suppliers, our employees, our products, our plants, and the company. Customer Service We seek to create a frictionless customer experience, regardless of how the customer chooses to do business with us. We are doing this by building an omni-channel hub capability that will enable our customers to connect with us over voice, text, chat, web, or system integration. This will create a seamless, integrated experience for our customers, while enabling a complete view of their experience to help us better serve them. Human Resources We are expanding our existing talent center hub to support employees’ career aspirations. The hub will help employees access opportunities for the kind of learning, mentoring, and development planning that lead to career growth. Sourcing We can drive a new level of efficiency in our sourcing operations by expanding upon strategic e-sourcing and e-procurement initiatives. We will do this through a “source to settle” hub that includes a comprehensive, unified view of spending and risks with our suppliers and sourced materials. New Product Development By redeploying and digitally connecting our new product development hub, we can evolve the stage-gate core process to organize, prioritize, and execute the innovation for anytime, anywhere collaboration for each business and discipline. This will enable us to deliver inventions and products with discipline and speed. Capital Engineering Our aim is to advance the capital delivery process to a highly collaborative engineering experience for a seamless handover of physical assets and digital twins to operational teams to run. By transforming the engineering back office hub, we can support the reduction of design time and engineering costs supporting the Digital Engineering initiative. Enterprise We will focus on a common, consistent set of tools, both existing and new, for efficient synchronous and asynchronous team collaboration. We will create a group productivity hub to streamline access to the tools that support how the team, function, or enterprise organizes work and gains insights. Each of the strategic initiatives is designed to drive the company forward and help us attain our desired efficiency outcomes with a highly productive and engaging work environment. We are mindful that the culture of the organization is key to our success with these initiatives. Opportunities for employee engagement, participation and feedback are planned and encouraged throughout. Photos submitted by: Yana Liu | Shanghai, China (left) Yuhang plant leader Yingyan Lu introducing the new EcoTouch ® production line. Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland (right) Jani Pernell working at the Parainen, Finland plant.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Digital Transformation | 70 The COVID-19 pandemic forced Owens Corning to rapidly accelerate our digital efforts. Now, Owens Corning continues to recognize the many benefits of integrating digital innovations into our operations. We have already seen many facets of our work transformed by new technologies, models, and advanced analytics. There was increased participation in many of our initiatives as people were able to connect remotely, while dashboards and other tools proved useful in tracking daily cases and trends related to COVID-19. As we look ahead on our digital journey, we anticipate finding new avenues for centralized analytics related to environmental, health, and safety concerns — all of which will benefit Owens Corning greatly as we pursue our 2030 sustainability goals. GOING FORWARD Photo submitted by: Leila Pourzahedi | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Tehran, Iran.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 71 COMPLIANCE AND BEYOND In this chapter: ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ PERFORMANCE ƒ GOING FORWARD In 2021, Owens Corning was ranked #1 on 3BL Media’s list of the 100 best corporate citizens for the third consecutive year — a testament to our commitment to sustainability. We believe that adherence to local, national, and international laws and regulations should serve as a baseline for our actions, and that we should strive to go beyond compliance as we work to be a net- positive influence on the world. Throughout our operations around the world, Owens Corning employees are taking the necessary steps to meet — and preferably exceed — the laws and regulations that govern environmental and social concerns. Through these efforts, we believe we can remain an exemplary corporate citizen for years to come. Photo submitted by: Scott Campen | Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S. Cherokee National Forest, Elizabethton, Tennessee

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 72 OUR APPROACH Our EMS includes the following elements: ■ Environmental policies that provide a framework for setting and reviewing our environmental objectives, as well as a commitment to continuous improvement and pollution prevention. ■ A process to identify significant environmental aspects and impacts and develop an action plan to achieve objectives and targets based on our policies and those significant environmental aspects and impacts. ■ Identification of legal and other obligations, including regulatory requirements, Owens Corning standards, and other needs, such as ISO certifications. ■ A system wherein all required environmental tasks are assigned to appropriate personnel and completed correctly and on time. ■ An organizational structure that identifies specific environmental authorities and responsibilities. ■ Assurances that personnel have the training and competency needed to carry out assigned work related to environmental impacts. ■ Procedures that outline how environmental information is communicated internally and externally. ■ Processes for the storage, retrieval, and retention of environmental records. ■ Operating procedures to control environmental impacts, updated according to the Management of Change process. ■ Documented emergency procedures and plans for responding to known and potential emergency situations that could have an impact on the environment, in alignment with an EHS Emergency Response Plan. ■ A process to identify, report, investigate, and correct nonconformities. ■ Periodic assessments to ensure the effectiveness of the EMS and its progress toward meeting its environmental objectives and targets. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland Our Environmental Management System Owens Corning’s Environmental Management System (EMS) is designed to help us adhere to the principles in our Environmental, Health, Safety, and Product Stewardship Policy. The EMS is a collection of policies and procedures regarding the management of environmental performance in our facilities, including compliance and footprint reduction. Through our EMS, we can set and review the environmental objectives and targets that drive corrective actions and ensure continual environmental improvement. All our facilities around the world are required to implement the system, track their progress, and perform environmental self-audits.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 73 The Owens Corning Code of Conduct Our Code of Conduct serves as an extension of our corporate values and guides our approach to business. The Code of Conduct was modernized and republished in 2022 to align more closely to our updated values and to reflect our culture more accurately as it has evolved through an expanding global presence and workforce. It contains the principles that guide ethical conduct in our business, which are designed to ensure that our employees act with integrity and avoid even the appearance of illegality or impropriety. These principles are framed by our values: ■ We care about health, safety, the environment, and each other. ■ We are committed to lawful and high integrity conduct. ■ We are collaborative, respectful, and transparent. ■ We are curious innovators, and we protect our company secrets and assets. While the language in our Code of Conduct has been simplified, our intent and expectation to comply with the laws where we do business and operate with high business integrity has not changed. Our policies apply to every single person at Owens Corning, regardless of position, country, business unit, or subsidiary. Our Code of Conduct and guiding principles are inspired by and aligned with the United Nations Global Compact (UNGC), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), the U.K. Bribery Act, and the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Anti-Bribery Convention. Owens Corning’s business conduct council and compliance committee have oversight and responsibility for worldwide compliance with these policies. Our general counsel and corporate secretary sit on both the business conduct council and compliance committee, and the assistant secretary to the board sits on the compliance committee. Both groups report results to the audit committee of the board, which provides oversight. Owens Corning maintains a confidential business code of conduct helpline and other mechanisms for receiving questions and concerns from our employees. Issues raised through this helpline are reviewed by the vice president of internal audit and legal compliance team. Further investigation and follow-up may be conducted by the internal audit team or external consultants, depending on the nature of the issue. Photo submitted by: Francesco A. Saccaggi | Bologna, Italy CISOM (Italian Relief Corps of the Order of Malta), an organization that helps victims of armed conflicts and natural disasters.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 74 COMPLIANCE INITIATIVES Environmental Compliance Owens Corning has policies and procedures in place to ensure that our operations are conducted in compliance with all relevant laws and regulations. Through these efforts, we are able to meet our high standards for corporate sustainability and environmental stewardship. EHS professionals conduct internal environmental assessments at both the site and business levels. Our manufacturing facilities are subject to national, regional, and local laws and regulations related to the presence of hazardous materials, pollution, and protection of the environment. These laws and regulations cover air emissions, discharges to water, management of hazardous materials, handling and disposal of solid wastes, and remediation of contaminated sites. To ensure our compliance with these regulations, we rely on our EMS, which is based on the principles of ISO and helps our manufacturing facilities track progress toward our long-term sustainability goals, which require significant global reductions in our environmental impacts that go beyond compliance. Approximately 36% of our locations were certified to ISO 14001, which accounts for 50% of our employees. In addition, approximately 47% of our locations use our internal Owens Corning EMS, which is based on the principles of ISO 14001, accounting for 36% of our employees. Thus, 83% of our locations have implemented an environmental management system, accounting for 86% of our employees. Further, approximately 47% of our locations were certified to the ISO 9001 standard for a QMS (Quality Management System) in 2021, representing approximately 62% of our employees. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM LOCATIONS EMPLOYEES ISO 14001 Certification 36% 50% Internal Owens Corning EMS 47% 36% Environmental Management System 83% 86% Throughout our operations, we work diligently to exceed expectations related to environmental compliance, data privacy, and more. Photo submitted by: Stefan Gielen | Tessenderlo, Belgium Mehmet Dalkilic and Erwin Lemmens, shift leaders at the Tessenderlo FOAMGLAS ® plant, during TPM bootcamp.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 75 Data Privacy Because we view data privacy as an element of personal safety, we comply with global privacy laws, and we collect, process, and transfer personal data in a trustworthy manner worldwide. Our commitment to data privacy extends to all Owens Corning employees and our stakeholders. To address data privacy, Owens Corning works to: ■ Minimize data collection. ■ Protect collected data. ■ Limit access to personal data to the personnel who need it (our systems owners and data holders). ■ Provide system owners and data handlers with extensive training on privacy laws such as the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). ■ Ensure that processes are in place to respond to personal data requests and to mitigate or address any privacy breach or other issues. We also continuously strive to strengthen our data privacy program. In recent years, we have taken on the following initiatives: ■ We have expanded the reach of our GDPR standards. ■ We have developed our own global data protection standards. ■ We have a cross-functional team to help maintain our protection standards and adapt to an evolving global landscape. ■ We have raised awareness of data privacy within our organization. ■ We have adapted our IT systems and platforms to reflect a “privacy by design” perspective. ■ We assess the IT environment and technical security systems of companies we acquire, ensuring that data collection and processing comply with our existing policy. We comply with all data privacy laws applicable in the countries and locations where we do business. We have also implemented enhanced security measures designed to protect against misappropriation or corruption of our systems, intentional or unintentional disclosure of confidential information, or disruption of our operations. Owens Corning has established information security controls to prevent unauthorized access to our systems. External assessments of Owens Corning’s security controls are conducted at least twice a year to validate the effectiveness of the controls and identify areas to continuously improve controls. Owens Corning received no substantiated complaints of customer data breaches in 2021. Data Privacy, Data Security, and COVID-19 During the COVID-19 pandemic, Owens Corning has remained cognizant of issues surrounding data privacy and data security. As we continue to monitor the health of our people, we have continued to comply with different regulations around the world with regard to the collection of information such as employee temperatures and other potential COVID-19 indicators. Our COVID Management Team has carefully monitored the flow of information to preserve employee privacy. As many employees have continued to work remotely throughout 2021, we have also maintained security standards to protect company data as people access information off-site. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland Reviewing plant data and operations.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 76 COMPLIANCE PERFORMANCE Environmental Control Owens Corning defines significant environmental actions as those in which the total cost of fines or penalties are equal to or greater than $100,000 USD. There are no significant environmental actions to report for 2021. The company has not experienced a material adverse effect on our capital expenditures or competitive position as a result of environmental control legislation and regulations. Operating costs associated with environmental compliance were approximately $42 million in 2021. We continue to invest in equipment and process modifications to remain in compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. Regulatory activities of particular importance include those addressing air pollution, water pollution, waste disposal, and chemical control. Over the next two to five years, we expect passage and implementation of new laws and regulations specifically addressing climate change, toxic air emissions, ozone-forming emissions, and fine particulate matter. New air pollution regulations could impact our ability to expand production or construct new facilities in certain regions in North America and around the world. We continue to monitor these potential impacts on our manufacturing operations and ensure that we have evaluated any new laws, regulations, and/or activities that could potentially have a material adverse effect on our current operations, financial condition, or long-term strategy. In support of these efforts, we continue to make progress in the reduction of our footprint globally. Owens Corning is involved in remedial response activities and is responsible for environmental remediation at a number of sites, including certain currently owned or formerly owned plants. These responsibilities arise under a number of laws, including, but not limited to, the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and similar state or local laws pertaining to the management and remediation of hazardous materials and petroleum. The company has also been named a potentially responsible party under the United States Federal Superfund law, or state equivalents, at a number of disposal sites. We became involved in these sites as a result of government action or in connection with business acquisitions. At the end of 2021, Owens Corning was involved with a total of 22 sites worldwide, including nine Superfund sites and 13 owned or formerly owned sites. None of the liabilities for these sites are individually significant to Owens Corning. On December 31, 2021, the company had an accrual totaling $6 million for these liabilities. Changes in required remediation procedures, timing of those procedures at existing legacy sites, or discovery of contamination at additional sites could result in material increases to our environmental obligations. Significant Spills Owens Corning acknowledges that releases, spills, or disposal of wastes and other substances by our operations could have negative environmental impacts. As part of Storm Water Pollution Prevention and Spill Prevention Countermeasure and Control in the U.S., and according to local legal requirements, we train our employees on best practices for avoiding and addressing spills. Response procedures for managing spills, as well as other emergencies, are in place for our facilities. In the event of an incident, we recognize our responsibility to complete environmental remediation, maintain remediated sites, and provide funding support at multiparty disposal facilities. Owens Corning has had zero significant spills since 2013. 2018 2019 2020 2021 Number of spills 0 0 0 0 Total volume of spill (cubic meters) 0 0 0 0

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Compliance and Beyond | 77 GOING FORWARD In Q4 of 2021, we performed an enterprise-wide Baseline EMS Assessment, which enables us to assess the corrective actions needed to improve our EMS. Though sites are required to perform a self-assessment, this baseline assessment is an enterprise-wide view of our EMS. We will use the results of this assessment to prioritize our attention and resources in the future. In the coming years, we expect regulatory requirements to become more stringent as the realities of climate change become more evident. We intend to stay ahead of new regulations, operating under the idea that our goals should reflect the real needs of the planet, and that often laws and regulations only serve as a baseline for actual change. Owens Corning intends to remain at the forefront when it comes to reducing our environmental footprint, and as we go beyond compliance, we hope to set an example for other companies around the world. Photo submitted by: Claudia Cantu | Houston, Texas, U.S. Daniel Llanos (left) and Luis Morning in the Houston Roofing plant.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Total Productive Maintenance | 78 TOTAL PRODUCTIVE MAINTENANCE In this chapter: ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ GOING FORWARD At Owens Corning, we believe in empowering our people — one way we do that is through the integration of Total Productive Maintenance into our operations. TPM is a management system designed to improve productivity. And because TPM encourages all employees to take an active role in maintaining, operating, and improving production, it can help us make real progress on our March to Zero. TPM provides a systematic way for employees to look for the abnormalities that can lead to problems over time, and to take corrective action if issues arise. Widespread adoption of TPM in our facilities helps us create an environment where people are encouraged to solve problems, and we find that the framework and mindset can be applied in exciting ways throughout our operations. By employing the principles of Total Productive Maintenance, Owens Corning demonstrates the confidence we have in our people. Their talent, drive, and passion are what it takes to build a better work environment, and TPM gives them the tools to do it. Photos submitted by: Jill Ries | Granville, Ohio (top) Christina Wise and Chris Amintrout inspect the shingle color on the viewing deck. Jill Ries | Granville, Ohio (bottom) Ryan Armstrong and Bryan Walser demonstrate LOBS testing. MARCH TO ZERO ACCIDENTS DEFECTS LOSSES ZERO

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Total Productive Maintenance | 79 OUR APPROACH ■ Training and Development (T&D) • Employees are given the knowledge and skills to carry out their responsibilities safely and effectively as a member of an autonomous team. • Skills assessments are used to identify gaps. • Employee skills are improved through training and sharing of best practices. ■ Autonomous Maintenance (AM) • Activities are created to restore equipment to its optimum condition and improve safety, quality, and productivity. • Employees are involved in the daily management of their equipment and processes. • Employees are empowered to prevent or fix problems, slow deterioration, and drive change throughout our culture and operations. ■ Focused Improvement (FI) • TPM teams identify and quantify losses throughout the plant, then they prioritize ways to eliminate losses and assign the right resources to these tasks. • Methodologies are deployed to address issues and ensure continuous improvement across our operations. ■ Planned Maintenance (PM) • This pillar, combined with AM, encourages proactive behavior and facilitates stable and reliable operations. • Supporting systems and processes enable employee engagement and data-driven continuous improvement. ■ Early Management (EM) • This pillar facilitates the development of user-friendly, sustainable equipment. • Effective design and development of new equipment, processes, and products reduce the potential for losses and abnormalities. • Time between development and launch is reduced, as are costs over products’ life cycles. ■ Quality Maintenance (QM) • Optimal equipment conditions are established and maintained, helping prevent losses in quality. • Employees receive the systems, tools, and skills needed to achieve zero defects in our operations. ■ Office and Administration • Activities are stressed that increase the quality, usefulness, and timeliness of information for internal and external customers. • Improvements are facilitated, and administrative resources are aligned with performance needs. ■ Environmental, Health, and Safety (EHS) • TPM activities are combined with EHS programs, which fosters a culture of safety among all employees. For each pillar, there is a multifunctional group that implements processes, provides training and coaching, leads cases, and assesses adherence to methodologies. Planned Maintenance builds upon the principles of 5S, which are designed to ensure that processes remain organized, disciplined, and efficient. 5S consists of five basic steps: Sort Remove all unnecessary items from the work area. Set in Order Organize the remaining items. Shine Clean and inspect the work area. Standardize Create standards that will ensure consistency going forward. Sustain Maintain a culture of continuous improvement. THE PRINCIPLES OF 5S Total Productive Maintenance is based on eight pillars.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Total Productive Maintenance | 80 Every plant is at a different point on the TPM journey, but each is moving with purpose and sharing. We survey employees to help plant leaders understand their teams’ readiness for TPM and to identify opportunities to enhance knowledge and improve skills. Based on this information and best practice examples, plants create training workshops and team- building opportunities appropriate to their stage in the journey. Although the COVID-19 pandemic continued to affect plants around the world throughout 2021, Owens Corning’s TPM teams have worked to maintain their momentum. The following are a few of the initiatives that Owens Corning introduced to keep us heading in the right direction on our March to Zero. ■ The daily briefing meeting is a key component of TPM. To ensure the safety of our employees during COVID-19 restrictions, we have continued to employ online solutions as applicable. Teams have been able to communicate remotely, manage tasks, and document progress according to the PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act) model. ■ We have continued to maintain our TPM Academy online. A range of training modules are now available on-demand for Owens Corning employees in 90-minute sessions. TPM INITIATIVES AT OWENS CORNING TPM is a true team effort, which we believe creates added value for our employees and our customers. The following are examples of the ways in which our TPM efforts have had a positive impact on our operations around the world. ■ L’Ardoise, France Employees employed the principles of TPM to address a piece on a winding machine, which was causing losses in their operations. A multidisciplinary team was assembled, including members of the PM, AM, QM, and Office and Administration teams. In a matter of weeks they had developed a solution that could be applied to the machines throughout the plant. In the past, achieving a project such as this would have taken six months — with TPM, it took less than two months. The knowledge gained here was shared with Owens Corning’s Center of Excellence. From there it was shared with other facilities around the world, as well as a key supplier. ■ Rio Claro, Brazil Employees at this facility used the principles of TPM, specifically the EHS pillar, to reduce the amount of fiberglass waste sent to the landfill. To achieve this, the team there developed relationships with specific customers to purchase our fiberglass byproduct. In addition, they conducted a study of demand versus operating time with a clear definition of daily productivity goals. These efforts resulted in a 20% reduction in the amount of waste sent to landfill from the period of December 2019 to October 2020. As our plants implement TPM in their operations, they follow a strategic approach. It starts with a preparation plan that focuses on daily management — the foundation of TPM — and includes an analysis of baseline key performance indicators. This analysis includes a range of management indicators that drive accountability and results: ■ Safety ■ Quality ■ Delivery ■ Cost ■ Production ■ Morale Photo submitted by: Jan Coerts | Apeldoorn, Netherlands Reviewing and implementing various TPM protocols at the Tessenderlo FOAMGLAS ® plant

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Total Productive Maintenance | 81 JIPM Excellence Awards The Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance (JIPM), the organization that first proposed TPM and continues to advocate for its implementation around the world, has awarded several Owens Corning facilities JIPM Excellence Awards. To be eligible for the Award for TPM Excellence, a plant must meet the following requirements: ■ A minimum of three years of achievement using TPM. ■ The ability to demonstrate activity based on eight pillars of TPM by all staff members. ■ The completion of Step 4 for autonomous maintenance activity. ■ An infrastructure for TPM activity and obtained tangible and intangible achievements. Once a plant has received this Level 1 award and been active in TPM for an additional two years, they are eligible for the Level 2 Award for Excellence in Consistent TPM Commitment. Photo submitted by: Melissa Andrea Zabarain Garcia | Besana, Italy Employees at the Besana plant earned the JIPM excellence award. Consistency Award (Level 2) ■ Rio Claro, Brazil (Glass Reinforcements) ■ Tlaxcala, Mexico ■ Yuhang, China Excellence Award (Level 1) ■ Apeldoorn, Netherlands ■ Guangzhou, China ■ Jackson, Tennessee, U.S. ■ Kimchon, South Korea ■ L’Ardoise, France ■ Rio Claro, Brazil (Technical Fabrics) ■ Taloja, India ■ Tianjin, China ■ Besana, Italy (Glass Reinforcements)* ■ Suzhou, China (Alloy)* ■ Qingdao Novia, China (Roofing)* ■ Changzhou, China (Technical Fabrics)* * Awarded in 2021

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Total Productive Maintenance | 82 GOING FORWARD Total Productive Maintenance is an essential component on our March to Zero, and we are greatly encouraged by the results we have seen at our sites around the world. Because its principles foster an environment of empowerment among our employees, we have found that TPM can have applications extending beyond its original intent. This includes ways in which we can reduce our environmental footprint. For example, TPM is helping us develop processes for using production waste in the manufacturing of our composite materials, which will help us divert more waste from landfills and place us closer to our 2030 goals. TPM has strengthened our approach to safety throughout the company. We have assigned a senior EHS leader to each enterprise-wide TPM pillar team, ensuring that safety is an integral part of our approach to each pillar. More information about the role TPM plays in our approach to safety can be found in the Living Safely chapter of this report. Owens Corning has also been employing the principles of TPM to support our healthy living initiatives. Sites are using TPM to build strategies and determine opportunities to make gains in employee engagement around health and wellness. We are also helping employees make the connection between healthy living and TPM as they compare health to safety, injuries, and first aid incidents. Related to TPM, we have been using the 5S framework to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 at our sites around the world. To learn more, please see the Healthy Living chapter of this report. Photo submitted by: Prathamesh Kulkarni | Taloja, India Safety is an important aspect of our culture.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Our Approach | Ta x | 83 TAX Owens Corning’s tax strategy is guided by the following principles: 1. Ensure that all tax filings and payments are made accurately and in a timely manner. 2. Build and maintain transparent and collaborative relationships with tax authorities. 3. Evaluate and mitigate risk through rigorous review processes and controls, including by external auditors. 4. Implement only those tax initiatives that are consistent with the company’s business objectives and risk profile. The company has a global team of tax professionals in many of its operating jurisdictions. Each location manages their respective tax affairs in accordance with Owens Corning’s Code of Conduct, global tax strategy, policies, and procedures. The chief financial officer has the ultimate responsibility for Owens Corning’s tax strategy. The vice president of tax oversees the day-to-day operations of the tax function including the execution of the company’s tax objectives and policies. Tax matters are reported to the board’s audit and finance committees on a regular basis. Information about Owens Corning’s taxes is provided in Note 19 of the company’s Form 10-K filed with the SEC. The information is bifurcated into U.S. and Foreign because the U.S. provides the majority of the company’s earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT). The management discussion and analysis (MD&A) section of Form 10-K provides an explanation of why the company’s global effective tax rate differs from the U.S. statutory rate. An additional table is provided in Note 19 Income Taxes to further explain the material differences between the effective tax rate and the statutory tax rate. Risk management is a critical part of Owens Corning’s tax function. The tax function has rigorous processes and controls in place to identify, assess, and measure known, new, and emerging risks. The risk of tax law changes is regularly monitored and analyzed using research software, trade and news publications, and active participation in tax associations. The company tracks proposed tax law changes globally to determine which changes could potentially have an impact on the company’s tax position, including the utilization of its tax attributes. Appropriate measures are then taken to mitigate the negative impact of such changes. In addition, the tax function works very closely with the company’s Corporate Financial Planning & Analysis (FP&A) and business finance and operational teams to understand both the short-term and the long-term trends of our global operations. Tax planning and operational initiatives are identified, analyzed, and implemented to support and complement these business objectives. Lastly, Owens Corning seeks to develop and maintain open and constructive relationships with tax authorities. The company strives to resolve disputes through mutual transparency and collaboration, always behaving in the utmost professional and ethical manner. Photo submitted by: Leila Pourzahedi | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Whistler, British Columbia

      At Owens Corning, we not only work to reduce our footprint, but we also strive to increase our handprint — the positive impact our products can have for our customers and the planet. The following material issues are essential to the expansion of our product handprint: ■ Circular Economy See how we’re working to close the loop on waste by extracting less raw material, engineering smarter processes, and developing end-of-life strategies for our products. ■ Product Innovation & Stewardship Discover how our approach to product development and improvement is informed by our commitment to sustainability. ■ Sustainable Growth We believe that what’s good for the environment can also be good business. Learn what we’re doing to integrate sustainability into our strategies. ■ Supply Chain Sustainability We hold suppliers to stringent standards — in emissions, human rights, and more. See the difference it’s making in our sustainability efforts. EXPANDING OUR PRODUCT HANDPRINT

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 85 CIRCULAR ECONOMY In this chapter: ƒ 2030 GOALS ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ PERFORMANCE ƒ GOING FORWARD For too long, the world has used a linear model of production — taking raw materials, making products, and discarding those products at the end of their use. It has proven itself to be unsustainable in every sense of the word, taking a massive toll on the environment. As resources grow increasingly scarce, it has ceased to be a viable way to conduct operations. Transitioning to the circular economy is also a path to decarbonization. For example, eliminating the need to extract virgin raw materials reduces the greenhouse gas emissions associated with mining, processing, and transporting those materials. To get full value from circularity, the technology and processes used to enable the needed changes in manufacturing cannot increase emissions. This becomes an important factor in evaluating potential technologies and processes that enable recycling or repurposing materials. The sustainability goals we have set for 2030 are very ambitious, and our circular economy goals are no exception. Achieving them will require a great deal of ingenuity and collaboration — characteristics that our employees have always demonstrated. Photos submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland Our circular economy initiatives align with the following UN SDGs: Sustainability Materiality Definition: A circular economy is one in which virgin raw materials waste, energy and emissions are minimized through intelligent design, renewable and recyclable input, energy-efficient production, and enabling the recycling of products at the end of their life cycles. We are committed to supporting the global transformation to a circular economy.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 86 By 2030: We will establish viable circular economy business models involving our materials and how they are used. We can accomplish this by: The following objectives are essential to the establishment of our circular economy model. OUR APPROACH Avoid the use of virgin raw materials whenever possible. The demand for recycled content among our customers is already strong, and we expect it will continue to grow. Our ability to meet customer expectations regarding product content — with full transparency — will be a key advantage as demand increases. We will rely on the companies with which we do business to help develop strategies that will limit the extraction of virgin raw materials. Source materials and serve customers in ways that minimize transportation and its impact. We are calling on our partners throughout our value chain to help us in our transition to a circular economy model. This includes local sourcing initiatives, including those in which cullet is sourced near our plant locations. More information about our efforts in this area can be found in the Supply Chain Sustainability chapter of this report. Manufacture products in ways that reduce the amount of waste generated and ensure the least negative environmental impact. Product innovation is central to this approach, through the development of products that are sustainably made and deliver positive impacts for customers. The ingenuity of our people is also key, as they discover new ways to increase efficiencies in our processes. In addition, the principles of product stewardship help us remain fully transparent as we demonstrate our commitment to sustainability. Ensure that materials used in our products and packaging remain in the economy indefinitely. In Europe, end-of-life solutions are already the subject of a strong legislative drive, and Owens Corning is working to go beyond compliance as regulations become increasingly stringent. One challenge we face is finding applications and external companies that accept some of our byproducts, so we are seeking solutions that minimize waste at every step. This often involves taking materials back into our own operations or repurposing materials for alternate uses. Through it all, our goal is to ensure that materials are not discarded into landfills, which will require open collaboration with other companies throughout our value chain. Owens Corning Manufacturing Use and Consume End of Life Materials Transportation CIRCULAR ECONOMY Transportation 2030 GOALS FOR THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY Our fiberglass insulation contains anywhere from 53% to 73% recycled content, depending on the product. This includes a high level of post-consumer content in our light-density building insulation, typically coming from recycled beverage containers. Collaborating up and down the supply chain , with customers, suppliers, communities, academics, policy makers, government entities, and other organizations. Increasing recycled content and decreasing virgin raw materials used in our products. Developing technical solutions and practical business models for our product materials and packaging, so they can be used for beneficial purposes even after they are no longer used for the original purpose.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 87 The Owens Corning Circular Economy Team Our work toward establishing circular economy models in our operations is driven by our circular economy team, which was established in November 2020. The team, led by our chief sustainability officer (CSO), defines goals and prioritizes projects that accelerate our circular economy ambitions. They consolidate and build on the work we’ve done over the past few decades, and they serve as a hub for thought leadership, expertise, and shared learnings. To execute our plans, the team also partners with subject matter experts and teams across our company, as well as other key stakeholders in the industry. This structure creates shared accountability for meeting our goals. The circular economy is not a “sustainability team initiative” but a challenge, opportunity, and goal shared by all businesses and functions, in all regions. Our circular economy efforts are focused in two areas: ■ Manufacturing This work focuses on meeting our 2030 waste management goals — reducing the intensity of waste generated by our processes by 50%, and then find ways to reuse or recycle the rest — as well as our efforts to expand the use of recycled materials in our manufacturing operations and products, across all businesses. ■ End-of-life solutions We are seeking innovative technologies and business models for our products and materials to be reused and repurposed indefinitely. This work includes partnering internally with R&D, commercial, and corporate development counterparts to shape the vision and execution in this area. We also engage with external partners to develop end-of-life solutions for our products, as well as the products where our materials are used. Our work in this area is detailed throughout this chapter. There is a great deal of synergy between these two areas as we create opportunities to reclaim customer waste, deconstruct products at the end of their lives, and discover uses for those materials as raw material inputs for our operations and products. Building a circular economy model requires a tremendous amount of collaboration — across all our businesses, among our various departments, and with all our customers. On the next two pages, we provide some examples that demonstrate our commitment to the circular economy — and how we’re putting our ambitions into action. Photo submitted by: Karmakar Rupak | Silvassa, India

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 88 Take-Back Models One essential component of the circular economy involves the establishment of take-back models, in which manufacturers accept responsibility for downstream waste from customers using their products. For Owens Corning, this can include waste generated during construction, subsequent fabrication, or installation, as well as protective packaging. Owens Corning Paroc, our European mineral wool business, has a long-standing commitment to take-back models, dating back to 1996 (before the company was acquired by Owens Corning). They developed the Rewool program, a customer take-back model for their mineral wool. Leftovers from trimming stone wool insulation during installation, which would have once gone to a landfill, are now collected and recycled for future use. Their take-back model required technological innovation throughout the process, from when and how the material is collected in bags, containers, or compressed bales, through storing, pretreatment, and the final recycling procedure. In developing this process, the team worked to ensure that it was safe, easy to work with, and efficient. For example, in one business model, stone wool cut-off is pretreated by grinding it, then it is fed directly back into new products, eliminating processes that would involve additional resources, such as remelting. In recent years, Owens Corning Paroc’s take-back model has continued to improve, and we are expanding by entering agreements with partners for support in collection and logistics to increase efficiency and flexibility in our model. The model was expanded into Finland in 2020, where customer waste from installation is processed and recycled into blowing wool. Our recycling partner reported that about 5,000 MT (mainly stone wool and a small amount of glass wool) was recycled in 2021, of which approximately 120 metric tons were attributable to Paroc. We are working with our customers to tailor the model to suit the specific needs of the building sites, including those striving to achieve zero waste-to-landfill. In October 2021, our Swedish take- back model was expanded, enabling us to recycle offcuts from customers in Norway. Byproduct is transported via a third-party waste handling company from Norway to one of our facilities in Sweden for recycling. This is an ongoing project for Paroc, one that shows a great deal of promise for the circular economy and will serve as a learning-pilot for implementation in our other markets. In addition to these efforts, we have developed a take-back model for our metals packaging products. This initiative is discussed in more detail on page 91 as part of our commitment to closing the loop on protective packaging. REWOOL T AKE BA CK SYSTEM SWEDEN SINCE 1996 FINLAND PA RO C ® Stone wool products PA RO C ® Stone wool products Recycled at Paroc factor y Transpor t through a third-par ty Third par ty recycles byproduct int o blowing wool Customer Installation off cuts Customer installation off cuts from Sweden and Norwa y Transpor t to Paroc plant Reuse through blowing wool SINCE 2020 Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 89 Shingle Recycling Each year, over 13 million U.S. tons of shingle waste is generated. Less than 10% of that is manufacturing waste, and the remaining balance consists of shingles removed at the end of their life, after decades of use protecting homes. Over the years, Owens Corning has attempted to solve this problem with varied approaches. By volume, the most impactful use of shingle waste has historically been to process for reuse into asphalt paving. The Specialty Asphalt paving business has leveraged the Owens Corning contractor network and our unique position in the roofing and paving industry to develop opportunities for recycling post-industrial and post-consumer Recycled Asphalt Shingles (RAS). At its peak in 2015, two million U.S. tons of RAS were used in paving, and although that amount has dropped considerably, we are confident that with the right technical expertise, processes, and products, it can be an important contribution to the shingle circular economy. Owens Corning worked with companies in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, U.S., to reuse byproducts from manufacturing and post-consumer shingle waste in paving applications. Using balance mixed design (BMD) techniques, the asphalt mixtures contained up to 5% recycled asphalt shingles and 20% reclaimed asphalt pavement. Through this program, the team diverted 18,000 U.S. tons of shingle waste from landfills in 2021. Additionally, Owens Corning is continuing to innovate with technology and contractor partners on further developing and refining mix designs which will build confidence among departments of transportation and the paving industry to increase the use of RAS in paving, unlocking potential for significant diversion waste shingles from landfills in the future. In addition to diverting shingles to paving applications, by deconstructing the component parts of the shingle — its granules, glass, sand, and filler — we are pursuing the capability to extract the value from those components. Owens Corning is working with a range of companies, from large corporations to small entrepreneurial innovators in adjacent industries, to develop efficient, effective, and practical ways to bring end-of-life shingle waste into the circular economy. In conjunction with these efforts, our Roofing business is promoting recycling among roofing contractors. We have created a campaign designed to highlight the benefits of recycling. This includes increased demand for sustainable products, especially as younger generations enter into homeownership, as well as limits on building waste in landfills, which are imminent. To support contractors in this campaign, we have developed a range of marketing materials, including flyers, yard signs, door hangers, and more, which they can use to differentiate themselves from the competition and to help build their brand as a company that cares about sustainability. While our ability to fully implement this campaign remains contingent on the availability of shingle recycling sites near the contractor, we are confident that this engagement of contractors can be an important component of our shingle recycling initiatives in the future. We are also working with the markets into which these products would go, from roofing solutions to industrial asphalt and the specialty paving industry. The use of reclaimed asphalt pavements (RAP) is one of the largest circular economies in the U.S., representing over 85 million tons each year. Our Specialty Paving business participates in this through the development of unique binders that allow for increased use of RAP in asphalt pavement. In addition, we are addressing waste through our work with industry organizations and regulatory agencies. Owens Corning has a leadership role with Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) with respect to the Asphalt Roofing Recycling Committee and the Asphalt Institute Foundation (AIF) research area. We recently helped sponsor and participated in ARMA’s shingle recycling forum, which was a virtual national event focused on recycling. We also are working directly with agencies such as CalRecycle, an organization within the California EPA, to share best practices and collaborate on programs which promote the development of sustainable practices at the intersection of industry and state policy. 3D Printing One way we are using technology to implement the circular economy model is through 3D printing, including metal 3D printing. We have found it to be a valuable resource in our development of prototypes, and we are actively working to expand our capacities in that area. In 2021, we installed a new 3D metal printer in our prototyping lab in Granville, Ohio, U.S. In addition, our partnership with The Ohio State University has enabled us to 3D print a critical part in our manufacturing process. The implementation of 3D printing offers us several advantages in reducing waste generation, which is aligned with our circular economy goals, as materials can be recycled back into powder. This creates a closed cycle with very little waste. In addition, when parts can be printed on demand, we can potentially have fewer parts on hand as inventory. Owens Corning is working to develop innovations that will increase the use of recycled asphalt shingles in paving — and divert more shingle waste from landfills. ” “

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 90 CIRCULAR ECONOMY PERFORMANCE Photos submitted by: Olivia Kasle | Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S. (top) Wind farm. Anna Brivio | Besana, Italy (bottom) Windmill in Normandy, France. Wind Turbine Blades Wind power remains a central component of the world’s renewable energy strategies, and Owens Corning is proud to produce glass used in the reinforced composite materials that make wind turbine blades and nacelles. To fulfill wind power’s potential, we also recognize the need to develop end-of-life solutions for these blades. Left unchecked, there could be as much as 2.2 million metric tons of high-volume wind blade waste in landfills by 2050 in the U.S. alone. In the U.S., Owens Corning collaborates with organizations such as the American Composite Manufacturers Association (ACMA) and the Institute for Advanced Composites Manufacturing Innovation (IACMI), as well as other stakeholders in the wind industry value chain to develop solutions to effectively deal with this amount of waste. In addition to extending the service life of turbine blades, from 20 years to 30 or 40 years, we have been looking at ways to close the loop where waste is concerned. In addition, efforts are being made to find above-ground storage options, which allow for a quick transformation from end-of-life in a landfill to other, more beneficial solutions. For example, the materials can be used in cement kilns where energy and chemical content can be extracted, and the remaining inorganic materials are a raw material source for the cement. We are collaborating with industry partners to develop processes to cut and section wind blades, strip them of their metal, and shred them. We are also working with startup companies to conduct controlled pyrolysis processes for successful recovery of energy and glass fiber. In addition, current efforts are underway with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and blade manufacturers to pelletize the shredded blade as a potential molding material for new wind blades. The pellets can also be used as a molding material for a variety of applications, including use in packaging, decking, and railroad tie manufacturing. The challenge is to be able to do this economically, at the scale required to fully divert blades from the landfill. Owens Corning is also a partner in the ZEBRA (Zero WastE Blade ReseArch) project in Europe, a cross-sector consortium launched in 2020 to develop the first 100% recyclable wind turbine blade. A number of products have been manufactured with input from our Chambéry wind lab, including glass fiber reinforcements that enhance composite performance when used with a new thermoplastic resin. In addition, testing is ongoing to identify resin-matrix interface properties that will deliver the optimal solution for our customers. Owens Corning has also been invited to participate and is engaging with another ongoing European consortium focused on deconstructing and recycling first generation wind turbine blades. These blades use thermoset resins which by design are more difficult to deconstruct and recycle. Owens Corning will be exploring options to rejuvenate recovered glass fibers from these processes or remelt in our production facilities, which effectively converts unusable glass to new glass made from recycled content.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 91 Achieving zero waste to landfill is an essential part of our circular economy ambitions, and this often involves finding new uses for materials that might otherwise have simply been discarded. This can be challenging; for example, we currently have no suitable internal process to recycle waste from the manufacturing of nonwoven materials in its roll form, and there are currently not enough diversion outlets available to successfully recycle all nonwoven waste. This is due in part to the complex nature of nonwoven material, which combines glass fibers with fire retardants, organic binders, and mineral fillers. To help drive the implementation of the circular economy model, Owens Corning has established a pilot program at our facility in Apeldoorn, Netherlands, which aims to address this challenge by developing cost- effective ways to upcycle nonwoven waste material. The project team has been working with a thermoplastic compounder, who is making compound from our waste mat fibers and recycled polymer. In 2021, the project achieved an important milestone as the team performed the first-ever successful compounding and injection of 100% post-industrial recycled flakes. After testing different grinding technologies for making these glass flakes, we have upgraded the compounding line at our Science & Technology Center in Chambéry, France, for testing these materials and defining a comprehensive value proposition. One promising avenue is in thermoplastic compounding and injection molding, in which nonwoven byproducts are repurposed to make components for use in automotive, appliance, and electrical applications. By diverting waste from the landfill, the project also has the potential to deliver significant savings in terms of landfill costs. Looking ahead, the team is working to leverage additional external partners and identify new thermoplastic applications. In addition, they are gauging the extent to which the project can be expanded beyond the Apeldoorn facility’s nonwoven waste and into other nonwoven or glass fiber byproducts. These options may include thermoset resins, cement-based formulation, and wood- and paper-based products. Protective Packaging Single-use plastics are known to be a major polluter of the environment. In addition to being non-biodegradable, they are too often disposed of without thought to where they will accumulate. Without taking the proper steps to collect, process, and ultimately reuse or recycle plastics — including packaging — their buildup and ultimate degradation in landfills and oceans threaten both the environment and human health. To address this critical problem, nations around the world have agreed to work toward the elimination of single-use plastics. The European Union is leading this effort by announcing new regulations, effective in 2025, to drastically reduce plastic pollution and establish circular economies. Owens Corning is a global producer of woven plastic packaging, used to wrap lumber, steel, and engineered wood products. We are currently working to reduce plastic waste by recycling our own manufacturing scrap, which is reprocessed and fed back into our standard production processes. Furthermore, the Roofing Components Product Development team has made significant progress to establish partnerships with European recyclers to launch a closed-loop recycling program. As regulations around the world continue to evolve, the need for packaging solutions that contribute to the circular economy becomes an even greater imperative, especially in Europe, where we seek to offer a closed-loop recycling solution for our products as recyclability requirements are growing increasingly stringent. Our team in Europe has contracted with a legal firm to offer guidance regarding the regulation of packaging recycling both throughout the continent and within individual countries. For example, one large steel company required recyclable packaging to replace the non-recyclable plastic-coated paper they had been using. We have worked with them to develop options that could protect their steel coils in transit and then be safely recycled. By using different corrosion inhibitors, we were able to develop new nitrite-free VCI packaging to go into our metals packaging products. In addition, our take-back program creates a pathway that greatly facilitates recycling. The customer can use the product to its end of life, we coordinate with partnering companies to collect and reprocess the material, and then we are able to reintroduce the materials into our products, creating a full closed-loop system. Reusable FOAMULAR ® Packaging Broadening their efforts to reduce the use of single-use plastics, the Roofing Components team has repurposed their lumber wrap product as a reusable packaging for shipping FOAMULAR ® , replacing stretch wrap. Not only was stretch wrap single-use, but it also required a tarp to be installed over the pallets on the truck, which resulted in expensive additional shipping costs. The reusable lumber wrap packaging not only easily slips over the FOAMULAR ® pallets and provides Owens Corning with an exciting branding opportunity, but also saves the company $2.3 million in freight costs annually. As an additional benefit, the elimination of the tarping process reduces safety risks as trucks are loaded. NONWOVENS: HELPING CLOSE THE LOOP IN EUROPE

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 92 SPEAKING OF SUSTAINABILITY With his long-standing interest in reducing waste and inefficiency, Robb Camm immediately recognized the circular economy model’s potential to be a game-changer, and how it can reshape the ways we design, innovate, and manufacture. Robb is a roofing asphalt sustainability scientist based at our Science & Technology Center in Granville, Ohio, U.S., and he actively seeks ways to integrate the principles of the circular economy as he develops innovations for our Roofing business, including end-of-life solutions for shingle waste. Robb shares his philosophies regarding the circular economy, as well as the challenges we face on the way to progress. Photo courtesy of Robert Camm On the comprehensive nature of the circular economy A true circular economy to me is a system or process that is regenerative in nature from start to finish. That includes employing renewable energy in production, creating products from recycled material feedstocks, and then ensuring the products are easily regenerated or reused as opposed to being wasted. It’s not only about using recycled material to produce consumer goods, but engineering innovative products that can be harvested for reuse or recycling. On the gravity of the situation and the role of Owens Corning The modern form of our human ancestors evolved around 200,000 years ago, and we have managed as a species to knock this planet out of balance just within the past approximately two hundred years, marked by the beginning of the industrial revolution. It makes me sad to know that generations before me started this process, and I want to belong to a generation that helps break that trend. Furthermore, Owens Corning has employees in over 30 countries, so its reach is large, and its impact is equally as big — global in scope, but human in scale. Owens Corning has the potential and can truly make a measurable difference in this specific branch of sustainability. On the progress we’ve made and the road ahead We’re talking about things that are not going to change overnight. It’s a long game to play. Honestly, one of the hardest parts for me was wanting immediate results. I definitely had to come to terms with the fact that shingle recycling and reuse have been explored by Owens Corning scientists and engineers for years. The difference is we now have some tools and newer technologies to help us answer questions or solve problems that we didn’t have before. It took decades for us to be able to get to a point where we can study this with high impact, and it’s going to take more than just a few years of my time to make sure that we’re doing it correctly and that we’re implementing it in a way that contributes to the circular economy. It’s also not just a problem for Owens Corning. Every company and every household have roles to play — because every bit of sustainability matters. Owens Corning has the potential to truly make a measurable difference. ” “ Robert Camm Roofing Asphalt Sustainability Scientist

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 93 Local Circular Economy Initiatives From large-scale enterprises to smaller on-site campaigns, Owens Corning sites around the world are taking steps to contribute to the overall circular economy and achieve our sustainability goals. The following examples demonstrate our commitment and serve to inspire us at every level. ■ Liversedge, U.K. In February 2021, this Composites plant introduced a new process in which rolls that previously would have gone to waste can now be sent to a third- party company, which will use them in road construction and in the creation of children’s play areas. While this process is still being refined, it marks an excellent first step toward closing the loop on waste. We anticipate expanding the program in 2022, as shipping difficulties related to COVID-19 are resolved. ■ Parainen, Finland Our stone wool plant has taken another step forward in reducing waste with the installation of dewatering equipment in May 2021. This equipment reduced moisture content in wet and filtered waste to 12%, which enables the dewatered waste to be fed back into the electrical melting furnace. ■ Joplin, Missouri, U.S. In July, this Owens Corning mineral wool plant entered into an agreement with the Cherokee County Road and Bridge Department in Missouri. Through this arrangement, the county will be diverting byproduct materials from the landfill and using them in the maintenance of roads throughout the region. This initiative has the potential to reduce the site’s waste-to-landfill by 95% or more. ■ Wabash, Indiana, U.S. Our plant sends byproduct to 10X Engineered Materials, which owns and operates a recycling facility designed specifically to process our plant’s dragline shot to be used as sandblasting material for the abrasives market. After delays related to COVID-19, the company’s sales have begun to dramatically increase. In 2021, the U.S. Navy began using 10X materials for use on a submarine base. ■ Changzhou, China The technical fabrics plant here provides glass waste to a third-party company, which uses it to make glass reinforcements for a variety of composite applications. The company is also evaluating other Owens Corning Fabrics plants’ waste streams for use in their operations. ■ Fairburn, Georgia, U.S. This insulation facility uses over 100 million pounds of recycled glass each year. Among the sources for this glass is a third-party recycling company, which provides the plant with glass collected from apartment complexes, bars, restaurants, and stadiums throughout the Atlanta, Georgia, area. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Circular Economy | 94 In many ways, our commitment to the circular economy model is at the center of our sustainability journey. It’s connected to our waste management strategies, our approach to product innovation and stewardship, and ultimately our plans for sustainable growth. Our circular economy team has brought a streamlining of our various circular economy initiatives, helping us focus our actions at our sites around the world, and they will be integral as we continue to develop our circular economy model. This will require the establishment of effective processes and the cooperation of our entire value chain as we develop innovative products and cultivate the markets in which they will be used throughout their life cycles. With this team in place, Owens Corning is now in an even better position to invest in the capabilities needed to achieve our circular economy ambitions, from people to resources to emerging technologies. We have begun a pilot program to build capability for recycling within our Composites business with the aim of enabling circularity. We are also investigating the potential in processes such as chemical recycling, which could prove valuable as we try to perform tasks such as separating fibers from resins and chemicals. This level of investment demonstrates our dedication to this bold — and very necessary — rethinking of the way we do business. GOING FORWARD Photo submitted by: Claudia Cantu | Houston, Texas, U.S. Alyssa Macias inspects shingles on the manufacturing line.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 95 PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP In this chapter: ƒ 2030 GOALS ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ PRODUCT INNOVATION ƒ PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP ƒ PRODUCT SUSTAINABILITY & TRANSPARENCY ƒ GOING FORWARD Owens Corning products help make the world a more sustainable place, from insulation and roofing products that save energy in homes and workplaces to composites that help make renewable power even more viable. That’s our product handprint — the positive impacts we have around the world — and extending that handprint is vital. One way we do that is through innovations that are in keeping with the principles of product stewardship. Our people are working to lower our negative impact wherever possible and transparently present that progress. And given the ingenuity and passion of our people, we are confident that the goals we have set are within reach. Photo submitted by: Qu Leilei | Qingdao, China Our product innovation and stewardship efforts align with the following UN SDGs: Sustainability Materiality Definition: We utilize innovation in the principles of product stewardship to ensure that our products are fundamentally safe and sustainable in their design, creation, use, and eventual end of life. We also seek to drive continual improvement in the sustainability of the products we offer, both in their creation, and in their ability to help the world meet its sustainability needs.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 96 By 2030, we intend to offer the most recognized and preferred products for sustainability. To meet this ambitious goal, we are striving to implement strategies that deliver the lowest impact with respect to embodied carbon among all available options. We will design our products for recycling or reuse at their end of life while using Life Cycle Assessments as our guide. We will ensure our products contain a high percentage of recycled and renewable materials. In addition, we will collaborate with our suppliers to increase transparency regarding the raw materials we use in our products. This helps us understand and control the full impact of our products — and enables us to share that information with our customers so they can do the same. OUR APPROACH Product innovation is essential to all three of our core businesses — Composites, Insulation, and Roofing — as we develop new products and applications across a growing range of key market segments. This innovation is inspired by the needs of our customers and addresses growing global trends. By collaborating closely with stakeholders, we can deliver sustainable solutions that meet the demands of the marketplace. As these demands increasingly include the need to address human impact on the environment, our approach to innovation is rooted in a commitment to sustainability. That means our products can make a material difference as people and companies work to meet their own sustainability goals. Product stewardship is a driving force behind our approach to innovation. As we develop new products or improve existing products, everyone involved understands that they share the responsibility for reducing those products’ environmental footprint and increasing its product handprint. Product sustainability and transparency is engrained in our commitment to delivering innovation that also provides sustainability advantages for customers across all our businesses. We achieve this by evaluating our products’ environmental and material health. Many of our insulation products are GREENGUARD ® Gold Certified, meeting the most stringent standards on indoor volatile organic compound (VOC) emission levels. We are working to increase the number of Health Product Declaration ® (HPD) and Declare “nutrition labels” for our products, and we are participants in and sponsors of the Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (EC3) tool. This tool is used to help designers and specifiers make more informative choices when it comes to product selection. At every point in a product’s life cycle, we must consider its potential environmental impact. To mitigate that impact, we work to ensure our products are sustainably made, using our stringent stewardship process to evaluate 100% of our new and significantly modified products for EHS impacts. 2030 GOALS FOR PRODUCT INNOVATION & STEWARDSHIP Photo submitted by: Eddy De Munter | Zele, Belgium Umman Tanriverdi (right) presents her new design concept on the Max20 and Max22 to eliminate fabric waste, reduce costs, and help solve concerns from operators. Also pictured is Wendy Crabbe (left). Our eleven Science & Technology Centers, located in key markets around the world, play a vital role in the development of solutions that meet customer needs and address global concerns regarding sustainability.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 97 PRODUCT INNOVATION Products That Make a Material Difference Owens Corning’s commitment to sustainability drives innovation across all three of our businesses. The result is a portfolio of products that help make the world a better place. The following examples represent some of our recent successes. Pure Safety ® insulation We have expanded the reach of this high-performance insulation, the only building material to offer Asthma Allergy Free certification. This product offers an incremental reduction of dust in the material. PAROC ® Natura insulation This line of stone wool insulation uses low-carbon melting technology, green electricity, recycled waste materials, and new technologies to reduce the amount of virgin raw material used and offer a product with very low CO 2 emissions. The remaining emissions are compensated by reducing global CO 2 e emissions through the purchase of offsets in a Verified Emissions Reduction Scheme. The new product line, which is certified as carbon-neutral by a third-party, offers durable insulation for the building industry and became available in Finland, Norway, and Sweden at the beginning of 2021. Net-positive: When a product is saving more energy in use than it took to produce it. Legacy FOAMULAR ® becomes net-positive in approximately 3.4 years. New FOAMULAR ® NGX™ becomes net-positive in about 7 months. As we work toward our 2030 sustainability goals, we can point to the progress we have already made in increasing the sustainability of our products. These examples demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to product sustainability evaluation as part of our innovation process. Insulation Innovations PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation Launched in 2021, PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation features a number of innovations that increase our overall product handprint. The trade association NAIMA estimates that insulation saves 12 times the energy required to manufacture it within the first year of its use, and PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation offers even greater sustainability advantages, including the highest certified recycled content in the industry. In addition, it is certified made with 100% renewable electricity through the use of power purchase agreements, and it has earned Underwriter Laboratories GREENGUARD ® Gold certification for low volatile organic compounds. (See page 107 for more about our products that are certified as made with renewable electricity.) FOAMULAR ® NGX™ insulation As an important step toward our goal to combat climate change, in 2020 Owens Corning introduced a new product line: FOAMULAR ® NGX™ (Next Generation Extruded). The proprietary blowing agent in this new line of extruded polystyrene (XPS) foam products is optimized to demonstrate a greater than 80% reduction in embodied carbon compared to legacy FOAMULAR ® insulation products. The investment in developing a product that meets and exceeds the stringent regulations going into effect in 2021 and 2022 reflects Owens Corning’s commitment to offering building materials that merge the highest levels of performance and sustainability. The first project built with PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ insulation was a specially adapted smart home that was designed for a severely wounded U.S. military veteran and his family. Owens Corning donated these materials as part of our partnership with the Gary Sinise Foundation. Learn more in the Community Engagement chapter of this report. Photo: FOAMULAR ® NGX™ insulation being installed.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 98 Photos: Top: Windstrand ® composite material. Bottom: TruDefinition ® Duration ® COOL Plus Shingles in Midnight. Composites Innovations WindStrand ® This innovative material allows wind blade manufacturers to use 30% fewer layers of material in the blade molds, while delivering the same quality and performance as standard fabrics. This in turn represents a 50% savings in labor and production time for the blades. In March 2021, we introduced WindStrand ® 4000, as well as Ultrablade ® 2 and Ultraspar™ 2, three high-performance materials that help wind blade manufacturers develop longer, stiffer, stronger blades. This in turn helps make wind energy more cost-effective. In 2021, Owens Corning introduced ArmaStrand™ Type 30 ® Single-End Roving product into the Russian market. This product is specifically designed to provide customers with productivity savings while increasing the service life of rebar. Using corrosion-resistant Advantex ® glass fiber, ArmaStrand™ has the flexibility to be used in a variety of rebar manufacturing processes and maximizes the mechanical properties of rebar systems with increased fiber content and higher bar modulus to meet new industry demands. Roofing Innovations Duration FLEX ® The only modified polymer asphalt shingle with SureNail ® technology, with nearly 1.5x the nail-pull strength and 10% better strength than standard shingles, Duration FLEX ® also features improved granular adhesion and meets the highest impact resistance rating. After a successful launch in the U.S., Owens Corning developed a version specifically for the Canadian market. In 2021 Owens Corning continued to promote Duration FLEX ® in Canada to allow customers to access a version of Duration FLEX ® that meets CSA 123.5 standards as well as UL 2218 Class 4 impact resistance. The Cool Roof Collection Using a highly reflective granule technology that reflects the sun’s rays, Cool Roof shingles help reduce energy use by keeping roofs cooler and reducing air conditioning energy levels. Owens Corning offers a wide array of shingle choices that meet or exceed an aged SRI of 20 — the current aged Solar Reflectance Index minimum required for the Green Building Standards Code of Los Angeles County and Los Angeles City Cool Roofs Ordinance. In 2021, Owens Corning launched Duration ® COOL Plus Midnight color providing a new dark color offering in this energy saving line. Trumbull ® Asphalt Over the last six years, our Trumbull ® asphalt has made significant strides to reduce the number of oxidized products we produce for external asphalt markets. In 2015, 8% of our products were non-oxidized. Today, approximately 50% of the products we produce for the external asphalt business are non-oxidized, requiring less energy, lower temperatures, and fewer emissions. This has resulted in a 3% improvement in material efficiency across the 12 asphalt plants in the network. Recyclable Protective Packaging The European Union’s policy requires all plastic packaging in the EU market to be recyclable or reusable by 2030 to support the transition to a circular economy. Owens Corning is partnering with key players in lumber and steel to develop solutions through our expertise in polymer streams, with a goal of achieving these solutions by 2025.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 99 SPEAKING OF SUSTAINABILITY With more than 30 years’ experience in the asphalt industry — over 10 of them at Owens Corning — Laurand Lewandowski has insights into the innovations that have shaped where we are today and the trends that will be guiding us in the future. Laurand has been focused on sustainability for years, and his expertise has helped move Owens Corning toward our goals in many areas. Here, he discusses some of the key elements of his work in sustainability, as well as the collaborations required to achieve our aspirations. Photo courtesy of Laurand Lewandowski On having a scientific basis for sustainable innovation From a scientific perspective, you have to start out by defining your technology roadmap — how you are going to get from the point we are at today to the point in the future, where we’re able to divert a significant amount of our waste from landfill. And so we have to be holistic about what steps that takes, not only from the innovation side, from the science and technology area, but also from the business perspective, building out that ecosystem so that you have a sustainable process for achieving our goals. On new developments in specialty paving We entered the specialty paving business in 2015 and targeted some of the more niche areas that we could bring our technology strengths to. We had a couple of contractors that were very progressive and wanted to look more at recycling, so we partnered with them to make an asphalt mix design, which incorporated not only RAP (reclaimed asphalt pavement), but also recycled asphalt shingles. Working with our roofing plants' manufactured shingle waste, third parties who process those shingles, and then the hot mix asphalt contractor and our asphalt plant, we were able to successfully divert over 15,000 tons of shingle waste from landfill. By finding a key contractor that recycled the material and made a good performing pavement, we have a stepping stone to getting that approved by departments of transportation in the future. On working with the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA) I chair ARMA’s Asphalt Roofing Recycling Committee, and it’s an exciting time because ARMA is putting out a recycling statement that will be defining the vision of the industry going forward, so I have an opportunity to help craft that message for Owens Corning. This aspiration goal will then help focus the industry on the long-term diversion of shingle waste from landfill and back into circular economies. We have to be holistic, from the innovation side and from the business perspective. ” “ Laurand Lewandowski Director, Asphalt Innovation

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 100 Owens Corning’s product stewardship program is a collaborative effort among many individuals, each of whom bring their own expertise across a range of subjects. The entire product stewardship organization provides counsel, guidance, and direction to ensure compliance with the Owens Corning product stewardship policy and Owens Corning standards. The product stewardship organization consists of the following: PRODUCT STEWARDSHIP ■ Chief Sustainability Officer (CSO) ■ Senior Director, Sustainability ■ Product Stewardship Leader y Manages the stewardship process. y Leverages the expertise of the product stewardship review board. ■ Product Stewardship Review Board y Global members with expertise in: • EHS. • Sustainability. • Chemistry. • Sourcing. • Product Compliance. • Reliability engineering. • Building Science. • Technical subjects. • Toxicology. • Analytical testing. y Carries out product reviews for all new and significantly modified products addressing all elements of our EHS and Product Stewardship Policy at one or more of these stages: • Design. • Manufacture. • Development. • Launch. • Test market. y Meets weekly to review new and significantly modified existing products. ■ Product Stewardship Advisory Council y Senior business and functional leaders who are responsible for linking product stewardship to the Owens Corning enterprise. y Meets throughout the year to provide insights into key EHS and performance issues, review product stewardship guidelines, discuss product stewardship review board activities, and communicate to the company.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 101 Photo submitted by: Jill Ries | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Marilyn Pennington follows proper protocol to check the asphalt tank. Product Stewardship Policies Owens Corning’s Business Code of Conduct requires that all new and significantly modified existing products receive at least one product stewardship review to ensure they comply with Owens Corning’s Environmental, Health, Safety, and Product Stewardship Policy, including regulatory compliance and other requirements. We have product stewardship guidelines and standards that our product developers, engineers, and scientists are expected to follow to help meet our objective for our products to be: ■ Safe and environmentally sound to make. ■ Safe and environmentally sound to use. ■ Safe and environmentally sound to dispose of. ■ Able to perform as claimed. The Purpose of Product Stewardship Our commitment to stewardship encourages us to thoroughly evaluate the sustainability of everything we do, from design to production — and to challenge ourselves to perform more effectively year over year. Across all three of our businesses, we seek to implement continuous and measurable improvements in the way our products are developed and produced, to reduce the environmental footprint of our products by: ■ Saving energy and water. ■ Using salvaged, recycled, or plant-based content. ■ Conserving natural resources by reducing material usage, or using materials that are exceptionally durable, low- maintenance, or renewable. ■ Reducing the risk of exposure to hazardous and harmful materials. ■ Contributing to a safe, healthy indoor environment. ■ Striving to make products that are reusable and recyclable at end-of-life. Throughout the development of new products, we consider the following criteria: ■ Choice of raw materials, including reducing the use of water, energy, or virgin materials and increasing renewable raw materials. ■ Direct operations, production, and manufacturing, including the reduction of emissions, energy use, water, hazardous substances, and toxic materials. ■ Distribution, storage, and transportation, including increased safety, packaging choice, or reduced environmental impact. ■ Use phase — operation and servicing/maintenance, including energy, water, and material savings, as well as increased product durability. ■ End-of-life management, including recovery, disposal, and biodegradation. Our focus on incorporating recycled materials throughout the product innovation and stewardship processes helps us further our goals for the circular economy.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 102 Evaluating Sustainability Impacts As part of our product stewardship review process, we evaluate the sustainability impacts of R&D projects, new products, and new processes. In 2021, we began using the Ecodesign Strategy Wheel to make these evaluations. Based on the Okala Ecodesign Strategy Wheel, this powerful brainstorming tool integrates stage-specific Design for Environment and product sustainability strategies into the innovation process, empowering product designers to consider ways to ensure product sustainability throughout our products’ life cycles. The Ecodesign Strategy Wheel is available to all project teams and is recommended for use throughout the product development process, beginning in the early design phase. It focuses on seven areas of the product’s life cycle, in which our people are encouraged to consider the following principles: 1. Reimagined Design We are encouraged to rethink how to provide the product’s service or function, anticipate technological changes and updates, and take inspiration from nature. 2. Reduced Material Impacts We should choose materials wisely, avoiding those that damage human or ecological health while opting for those that adhere to our sustainability goals. 3. Reduced Manufacturing Impact Products should be designed for quality control while minimizing energy use, water use, manufacturing waste, emissions, and the number of components and production steps. 4. Reduced Logistics Impact We should develop reusable packaging systems and source local materials and production, using lowest- impact transport, while reducing volume and weight of products and packaging. 5. Reduced Use-Phase Impact Products should be designed for carbon-neutral or renewable energy and encourage low-consumption user behavior while reducing toxic emissions and the consumption of energy, material, and water. 6. System Longevity Products should be designed for durability, easy maintenance and repair, reuse, and repurpose. 7. Optimized End of Life Products should be designed for fast disassembly and safe disposal, as well as use recyclable, nontoxic materials. Throughout 2021, our primary focus was on training groups and individuals on the Ecodesign Strategy Wheel, as well as integrating product stewardship into our Project Review Board process. Summary reports of product stewardship reviews are shared internally with leaders on a quarterly basis by the product stewardship leader. Throughout this tiered process, we measure and verify a product’s composition and development at key points, according to desired safety, performance, environmental, and sustainability attributes. In 2021, 88 projects were reviewed, for a total of over 1,600 such reviews since 1997 and over 1,300 since 2006, the year product stewardship reviews were made a mandatory part of our Business Code of Conduct. DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENT INNOVATION STRATEGIES 1. Reimagined Design 2. Reduced Material Impacts 3. Reduced Manufacturing Impact 4. Reduced Logistics Impact 5. Reduced Use-Phase Impact 6. System Longevity 7. Optimized End of Life

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 103 EHS Impacts of Products and Services Owens Corning strictly adheres to internal controls for environmental, health, and safety (EHS) impacts, which are incorporated into our Business Code of Conduct. Every year, all employees are required to complete training on this code of conduct, and new hires throughout the company must undergo more in-depth training on our stewardship process. It is our policy that 100% of new and significantly modified products and services must be assessed for environmental, health, and safety impacts. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis We use many tools to ensure the safety of our products and processes, including failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). FMEA is a systemic way to identify, evaluate, reduce, or eliminate problems in products or processes. FMEA is conducted by cross-functional teams to ensure it reflects different perspectives and knowledge. Based on the results, a risk mitigation plan is implemented to ensure our products are safe to use and perform as claimed. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland Employee inspecting a manufacturing line.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 104 Product Circularity and Recycled Content Recycled content reduces waste and saves resources throughout our manufacturing operations. It also helps our customers comply with green building program requirements and achieve their own sustainability goals. Our commitment to using recycled content in our building materials is demonstrated through a multipronged approach: ■ We seek to include or increase the content of recycled materials in our products and packaging, either in initial design or through continuous improvement. ■ We validate recycled content through third-party verification bodies and offer documentation for use in green building programs such as LEED ® . ■ We promote the attributes of recycled content and educate customers and consumers on the value this brings to reducing landfill waste, as well as saving resources and energy. ■ We promote green products and green operations, including the benefits of recycled content and reducing impact over the products’ life cycles for all the industries we serve. ■ We participate as a member of organizations that promote recycled content in products, including the USGBC and its LEED ® program. Although most of the materials used in our processes are derived from non-renewable resources, we continue to look for opportunities to procure renewable sources, from raw materials to semi-finished goods and packaging. We are also focused on increasing our use of recycled packaging. Glass Recycling Using crushed post-consumer glass — also called cullet — as a raw material decreases community landfill waste, and it lowers our energy use associated with manufacturing insulation, as starting with raw materials such as sand requires more energy. In fact, the Glass Packaging Institute (GPI) reports that energy costs drop by about 2-3% for each 10% of cullet used in manufacturing. Even as we strive for higher recycled-glass content in our insulation products, the supply of recycled glass is at risk. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, only 31.3% of all glass containers were recycled in 2018 (the last year for which data have been published). In addition, many U.S. municipalities have removed glass from their curbside recycling programs, further threatening cullet supply. To help counteract these trends, Owens Corning works with other companies and organizations to support the glass recycling industry and the glass recycling supply chain as a whole. The Glass Recycling Coalition (GRC) and the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) are two of our key partners. Through GRC and NAIMA, we are particularly focused on promoting glass recycling in the Southeast, Northeast, Midwest, and Texas. We also helped form a glass cullet task force, with the following objectives: ■ Improving communication on end-use of glass containers to make fiberglass. ■ Increasing glass container recycling rates. ■ Improving glass cullet quality. ■ Protecting current recycling programs at the state and local levels. Owens Corning participates in several educational and informational workshops, including those by the Closed Loop Fund and recycled glass processor Strategic Materials, to promote open dialogue and collaboration among stakeholders interested in glass recycling. As we work to reduce our impact on the environment, and despite ongoing challenges in a number of communities across the U.S., we continue to seek to increase our use of postconsumer bottle glass in North America. We believe the availability of high-quality recyclable glass is critical to the ongoing execution of both our environmental ambitions and our overall growth strategy. . PRODUCT SUSTAINABILITY & TRANSPARENCY As we develop more end-of-life solutions and increase recycled content in our products and packaging, we make great strides toward enabling the circular economy model — which is essential to our sustainability ambitions.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 105 Insulation Products Owens Corning is a leader in using recycled content in our fiberglass insulation, ranging from a minimum of 53% recycled content to a high of 73% recycled content in our Canadian-made products. Our North American residential fiberglass insulation is certified by SCS Global Services to contain at least 55% recycled content, while our commercial and industrial fiberglass insulation is certified to have a minimum of 53% recycled content. In 2021, Owens Corning consumed more than 1.4 billion pounds of recycled glass globally, making us one of the largest users of recycled glass in the world. Our XPS foam insulation in North America has 20% certified pre-consumer content. Our Thermafiber ® mineral wool insulation is manufactured to have a minimum of 70% recycled content and is validated by International Code Council Evaluation Service (ICC-ES). Recycling and Reclaiming of Products and Packaging Owens Corning was the first roofing manufacturer to establish a roofing contractor incentive program for recycling asphalt shingle roof tear-offs. Recycling torn-off shingles helps the environment in two ways: old shingles do not end up in landfills, and they get repurposed as pavement. Each year in the U.S., approximately 13 million U.S. tons of potentially recyclable shingles are removed from the roofs of homes and buildings. Through a national strategic alliance with Earth911, we connect contractors with convenient recycling facilities. As part of the program, we ask contractors to help the environment and promote sustainable business practices by pledging to recycle their shingle tear-offs. As of 2021, over 800 contractors in our network have pledged to recycle their shingle tear-offs, including 74 new contractors who made the pledge this year. The amount of recycled shingles continues to decline every year due to factors such as: ■ Recycling centers closing. ■ Recycling centers discontinuing their shingle recycling operation. ■ Department of Transportation requirements. ■ Stockpile of material, and difficulty in getting asphalt companies to take the material. Our commitment to recycling also applies to our packaging. For example, Owens Corning uses wood pallets, which are reused throughout our plants, and the majority are recycled at the end of life. Recyclable cardboard is also used with some of our products. Each carton used for our insulation products contains up to 30% recycled content and is fully 100% recyclable after use. Cores used in our Composites business are made from recycled paper, and totes, bags, and super sacks are designed to be reused. 2018 2019 2020 2021 Total weight of material used 7, 6 9 5 , 2 6 5 8,208,112 6,812,476 8,416,366 Total weight of recycled raw materials 804,389 722,650 708,905 840,253 Percent of recycled content 10% 9% 10% 10% 2021 Recycled Input Materials (Metric Tons) Photo: FOAMULAR ® NGX™ insulation.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 106 Product Certifications and Disclosures Owens Corning uses third-party organizations to test and certify product attributes and to disclose their environmental, health, and safety impacts. We disclose core building products’ environmental impacts through the issuance of EPDs, in accordance with ISO standards. We also perform regular follow-up testing to maintain our certifications. Prior to being introduced in the marketplace, all product packaging and advertising is thoroughly reviewed by our technical services and legal departments, along with each business unit, to ensure compliance with all regulations and codes. In 2021, Owens Corning had no significant incidents of noncompliance with regulations or voluntary codes concerning the labeling, marketing, or advertising of our products and material services. In addition, Owens Corning had no incidents of noncompliance concerning the health and safety of our products in 2021. We have active product stewardship and product regulatory compliance programs designed to prevent product-related health and safety incidents. Environmental Transparency As part of our product sustainability goals, we are committed to evaluating our core products’ impacts throughout their life cycles — and to being fully transparent about our findings. We adopted a two-part methodology to calculate this cradle-to-grave environmental impact. ■ Conduct a life cycle assessment (LCA) according to the ISO 14040, 14044, and 14025, as well as ISO 21930 and EN 15804, followed by a third-party review and verification of appropriate product category rules. ■ Develop an environmental product declaration (EPD) from the LCA and implement continuous and measurable improvements related to those impacts. We remain committed to transparency about our products, from raw materials through production, use, and end-of-life, and will collaborate with our supply chain partners and customers to facilitate the adoption of a transparent value chain. Life Cycle Assessments (LCAs). LCAs are comprehensive measurements of the environmental footprint of a product at all stages of its life cycle, from the extraction of raw materials, through processing, manufacturing, and product use, and all the way to its eventual end of life through disposal or recycling. We have conducted full LCAs on 81% of our products, including shingles, fiberglass, mineral wool, FOAMGLAS ® cellular glass, and extruded polystyrene (XPS) foam insulation, as well as composite glass product offerings such as reinforcements, nonwoven mats, and technical fabrics. In addition, we have simplified or “screening” LCAs for 5% of our other products. By performing LCAs, we have identified many opportunities for improvement in our processes and products. We have also identified high-impact raw materials, enabling us to work with suppliers to reduce their footprint, which in turn helps us reduce ours. In 2021, we updated our LCAs on pipe insulation and roofing shingles. In 2021, we updated our LCA on Thermafiber ® insulation. We expanded and updated our LCAs covering composite glass products from 12 plants, focusing on rovings and fabrics. Owens Corning is an organizational member of the American Center for Life Cycle Assessments (ACLCA). Our LCA practitioners are active members of the ACLCA, and one of our LCA practitioners serves on its board of directors and co-chairs the industry committee. The ACLCA is a nonprofit organization providing education, awareness, advocacy, and communications to build capacity and knowledge of environmental LCAs. Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs). EPDs are a publicly available, third-party verified source for embodied carbon values. We have conducted LCAs and have issued EPDs on the following products: ■ EcoTouch ® Fiberglas™ insulation products. ■ Unbonded loosefill insulation. ■ FOAMULAR ® XPS insulation. ■ FOAMULAR ® NGX™ XPS insulation. ■ FOAMGLAS ® cellular glass insulation. ■ PAROC ® stone wool insulation. ■ PAROC ® Natura Lana stone wool insulation. ■ Thermafiber ® mineral wool insulation. ■ Owens Corning ® asphalt shingles. ■ WeatherPro ® Lumber Wrap. ■ Fiberglas™ pipe insulation. ■ 700 Series Fiberglas™ insulation. ■ QuietR ® duct board. ■ SOFTR ® duct wrap. In 2021, the ACLCA awarded their LCA Corporate Leadership Award to Cheryl Smith, product sustainability strategy leader at Owens Corning. Cheryl has been part of our LCA work for years, and she was integral to many of the early screening projects that helped establish the process.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 107 Made with Renewable Electricity A growing number of Owens Corning ® products, including some of our high-density insulation products and shingles, are certified as made with 100% renewable electricity and are part of a reduced embodied-carbon portfolio. These products were certified in accordance with SCS Global Services’ certification protocol. The certifications are made possible by power purchase agreements Owens Corning signed in 2015, which enabled new wind capacity in Texas and Oklahoma. Both wind farms came online in late 2016 and have the potential to generate 1.1 million megawatt hours of electricity per year. Owens Corning obtains and retires the energy attribute credits (EACs) generated by these wind farms, enabling us to receive third-party renewable electricity certification. We currently have 15 products that are certified: ■ EcoTouch ® Metal Building Insulation. ■ EcoTouch ® Flexible Duct Media Insulation. ■ Pink ® Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ Insulation. ■ Unbonded Loosefill Insulation. ■ Thermafiber ® Insulation. ■ Thermafiber ® Formaldehyde-Free Insulation. ■ QuietR ® Duct Board Insulation. ■ QuietR ® Spiral Duct Liner. ■ FOAMULAR ® NGX™ XPS Insulation. ■ Fiberglas™ 700 Series Insulation Board. ■ Fiberglas™ Insul-Quick ® Insulation. ■ Ceiling Board. ■ Duration ® , Oakridge ® , and Supreme ® 3-Tab shingles from our facility in California. These certified products, which make up 26% of our total revenues, alert commercial architects, specifiers, builders, and homeowners to lower-carbon product options as they seek to build greener structures. They also help architects design buildings with reduced life cycle impacts, in keeping with the recognized goals of the Architecture 2030 Challenge and U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED ® certification. Material Health In accordance with our environmental, health, safety, and product stewardship policy, we provide information about all our products, their performance, and safe use. Product content information can be found on product labels, EPDs, HPDs, and other transparency documents such as Declare labels. Content and disposal information is included on safety data sheets or safe use instruction sheets. Health Product Declarations ® (HPDs) and Declare Labels HPDs are an effective means of reporting the chemical makeup of a product and disclosing potential hazard concerns. The reporting follows a set of stringent guidelines set by the Health Product Declaration Collaborative ® (HPDC). Potential hazards are screened based on the GreenScreen for Safer Chemicals and additional lists from other agencies. HPDs enable architects, builders, and specifiers to evaluate and specify products with a comprehensive understanding of the product composition and potential hazards. Owens Corning’s HPDs are available for download from the HPD Public Repository. In 2021, we worked to ensure that all certifications were current. Owens Corning also has Living Building Challenge- Compliant Declare labels from the International Living Future Institute™ for unbonded loosefill fiberglass insulation, unfaced and kraft-faced PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ (formerly EcoTouch ® ) insulation, faced and unfaced Thermafiber ® formaldehyde-free mineral wool insulation, and Thermafiber ® Rainbarrier ® continuous mineral wool insulation. This certification demonstrates these products are fully compliant with the Living Building Challenge and allows them to be specified for LBC projects. In 2021, we worked to ensure that all certifications were current. Photo submitted by: Karmakar Rupak | Silvassa, India

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 108 Managing Materials of Concern All our manufacturing facilities and the products manufactured under our control are guided by our efforts to manage materials of concern (MOC), including chemicals that are not necessarily regulated, but which we believe pose sufficient safety, environmental, or regulatory hazard to merit restrictions on their use. These efforts apply to the use of raw materials and other substances used to produce products across all business activities. This includes research and development (R&D), manufacturing, tolling operations, distribution, and materials used to maintain the site facility and equipment. In addition, companies that supply us with raw materials are expected to verify that all materials used in the manufacture of Owens Corning ® products or the sale of products to Owens Corning were sourced in compliance with all applicable environmental laws, regulations, and legal requirements, per our Supplier Code of Conduct. As part of our product stewardship review process, a list of materials of concern is published on our intranet, where it is frequently updated. By consulting with these guidelines, we can: ■ Control the use of chemicals, polymers, and other materials. ■ Comply with laws and regulations in the places where we make and sell our products. ■ Ensure our products are safe and sound to make, use, and dispose of. To ensure the identification and replacement of any regionally banned or future banned chemicals, all our businesses are required to comply with the MOC list in the development of new or significantly modified products. These guidelines apply to all our controlled domestic and foreign subsidiaries and all other legal entities in which Owens Corning has controlling interest (>50%). As stakeholders become more interested in understanding the chemical compositions of our products, our product sustainability team develops programs to address all product-related stakeholder questions and concerns. Some of our products contain ingredients that have been banned in some regions, usually on a timeline for discontinuance. Though we use comprehensive risk assessments to ensure all our products can be used without harm to people or the environment, we put a replacement plan into action whenever we learn of an ingredient ban or discontinuance requirement. Under this plan, we also evaluate the applicable product line and enable R&D to address material substitution. Red List Chemicals Many chemicals do not necessarily fall under regulatory restrictions in certain jurisdictions around the world, but green building rating system developers and architecture firms have flagged them as chemicals of potential concern. Our product stewardship team monitors these Red List chemicals and maintains an internal list that is consulted as new products are developed or existing products are modified. We recognize that customers seeking specific certifications are choosing products that do not feature chemicals that appear on that certifier’s Red List. Therefore, it is mutually beneficial both to us and the customer that we are fully transparent and voluntarily offer information about the chemicals used to make our products, including chemicals that appear on Red Lists. Fiber Safety Owens Corning has been a pioneer in the science of fiber safety, and we continue to provide industry-leading expertise. By engineering our continuous filament fibers to be too large to be inhaled, and by controlling the composition of the raw materials we use to make our insulation glass wool, we ensure that all our fiber-based products are safe to manufacture and use. Owens Corning has an internal product stewardship guideline regarding fibrous materials, which states the company will not knowingly manufacture or use any fiber or fiber-containing material unless the fibers are shown to be non-respirable or biosoluble, or unless use of the material generates insignificant exposure as shown by measurements in the manufacturing and end-use environments. Compliance with this guideline is verified during product stewardship reviews. The safety of Owens Corning insulation products is supported by a 2001 decision by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In addition, the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) removed soluble glass wool fibers from its list of substances “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.” The decision was released in 2012 in a report to the U.S. Congress. In 2011, soluble glass fibers were removed from the California Prop 65 list. Owens Corning mineral wool products were never listed by NTP or Prop 65. We perform regular composition audits to ensure the fibrous insulation products produced in our plants have the correct composition and are biosoluble. All continuous filament glass manufactured by Owens Corning is non-respirable. By the end of 2021, over 1,300 of our employees had taken our fiber safety online training, which was developed in 2018. As a result of this training, they have a better understanding of fiber health and our stance regarding the kind of glass fiber we produce and use.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 109 SPEAKING OF SUSTAINABILITY In Europe, Paroc is leading the way in stone wool insulation innovations, and Susanne Fagerlund has been instrumental in steering these products and processes in sustainable ways. In addition to providing oversight that helps us increase our product handprint, Susanne serves on the product stewardship review board, which reviews new and significantly modified products from design to distribution. Susanne has been with Paroc since before it was acquired by Owens Corning, and her in-depth knowledge is invaluable as we strive to innovate throughout our industry. Photo courtesy of Susanne Fagerlund On asking the right questions for product stewardship When we start making innovations, in the early phases, we need to start thinking about product stewardship. It’s one of the enablers for our innovation process, and when we do the preliminary product stewardship, we have a lot of key questions. Is it doable? What are the important claims? What are the unique selling points for our customers? So we have this toolkit of questions to go back to when we do the final product stewardship process. It’s like a checkbox for us to check that, yes, we did it, or if there’s some more homework to do to be sure that we have met all the requirements, so that we can be sure that our quality is stable and safe and environmentally sustainable for all of our customers all over the world. On learning as the key to innovation In each project we take through the product stewardship process, there are small learnings and bigger learnings, depending on the scope and scale of the project. In some of our recent development projects, where we are doing significant changes in the products, it has given us the tools to stop and think if we have really widened all the angles. And it’s really enabling us to do the great innovations and get us to the next level to meet the tough, competitive world and the customer expectations. I’m really happy for our recent launches such as PAROC ® Natura Lana, which is our first carbon neutral product, and which went through these processes where we were thinking about how the product is developed and handled. On collaboration within the product stewardship review board Being part of the product stewardship review board is fascinating. It’s a deep learning exercise when you come from one angle of expertise, and you get insights and learnings to widen your thinking to other areas. It’s actually fun to see how we can challenge and question and improve our systems by getting other views on topics. Together we learn and that brings us to the next level, so I’m really excited to be part of this great journey in our company and making it even better for the future. Product stewardship is enabling us to do the great innovations and get to the next level. ” “ Susanne Fagerlund Senior R&D Leader, Mineral Wool

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Product Innovation & Stewardship | 110 GOING FORWARD Owens Corning is dedicated to consistently moving forward. In fact, our implementation of the Ecodesign Strategy Wheel demonstrates that we even think about innovation in innovative ways — with an eye toward product stewardship at every level of the product life cycle. Sustainability is central to our processes as we develop new products and improve existing ones, and it has been an increasingly high-profile part of our long-range planning. Because of this, we anticipate a continued expansion of our capabilities — and greater engagement across all our businesses — as we collaborate on innovative solutions to meet our 2030 goals. We are confident that the product innovation and stewardship goals we have set as a company are well within our reach. We also recognize that the need for sustainable innovations has never been greater, and that we must do what it takes to create a more livable world for generations to come. Photo submitted by: Danielle Wittorp | Dearborn, Michigan, U.S. A flower in a home garden.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 111 SUSTAINABLE GROWTH In this chapter: ƒ 2030 GOALS ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ PERFORMANCE ƒ GOING FORWARD With our mission to build a sustainable future through material innovation, Owens Corning has made sustainability central to our growth strategy. The success we’ve enjoyed this year, and the accolades we’ve received for our corporate citizenship, have strengthened our resolve to grow in ways that serve people today and preserve the environment for generations to come. We’re collaborating with our customers, so they can meet their own sustainability goals with innovative products that deliver optimal performance. It’s all part of a strategy for growth that’s evolving right along with the world, as people everywhere gain a better understanding of the need to minimize our collective impact on the environment. Our sustainable growth efforts align with the following UN SDGs: Sustainability Materiality Definition: As a company with sustainability at our core, we aim to align our company’s growth with sustainable trends and positive global impact. We achieve sustainable growth through serving our customers, fulfilling their need for quality, sustainable products. We are working to support the global transition to a sustainable economy by being a financially successful company with sustainability at its core. Photo submitted by: Priyanka Ruparel | Taloja, India

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 112 By 2030, we will design our products for recycling or reuse to optimize the impact of our products over their entire life cycle from raw materials to disposal. In 2021, we earned $8.5 billion in sales. Through our successes in the past year, we remain well-positioned to advance our overall product handprint aspirations for contributing to a circular economy model, ensuring collaboration throughout our supply chain, and delivering product innovation and stewardship in the years to come. OUR APPROACH At Owens Corning, we serve global markets with a wide range of products that meet customers’ needs, offering sustainability benefits without compromising performance. Through our portfolio of products and systems, we are well-positioned to capture growth from key secular trends, including: ■ Energy efficiency. ■ Sustainability. ■ Skilled labor shortage. ■ Digital acceleration. ■ Modular building. ■ Customer and channel consolidation. Solutions with enhanced sustainability attributes will be valuable in these spaces, and this is the foundation of our growth strategy. For our Insulation and Composites businesses, especially, our customers and key markets increasingly demand products and solutions that help them achieve their own sustainability goals. For our Composites business, the inherent properties of our products offer enormous opportunities for sustainability. Composites, now more than ever, offer the opportunity to transform our built environment, the transportation sector, and our energy infrastructure, given that they deliver lighter, more durable materials. Many of our products, described in this chapter and throughout the report, provide sustainability benefits that address trends that are driving growth. For example, as the move toward decarbonization gains momentum, Owens Corning fiberglass composites can help meet the demand for more efficient wind energy, enabling the shift away from electricity generated by fossil fuels. For our Insulation business, strong markets and the potential for further growth represent an opportunity for even greater leadership in our industry, as we work to improve upon the benefits of insulation as a means of conserving energy in homes and buildings everywhere. We can leverage our position to invest in the development of products, processes, and technologies that will help place Owens Corning on the path to net zero CO 2 e emissions. This includes continuing to increase the recycled content in our products and continuously reaffirming our commitment to the circular economy model. Driving sustainable growth begins with a thorough understanding of our key sustainability indicators and implementing them in ways that meet the needs of stakeholders. This includes the following indicators: ■ Achieving operational sustainability by reducing our environmental footprint in ways that are in line with global stakeholders’ expectations. ■ Charting a clear course of action to drive product and supply chain sustainability through enhanced engagement and by enabling product life cycle transparency. ■ Ensuring community impact through local community initiatives, which is a key aspect of honoring our social responsibilities. ■ Collaborating with customers and across our supply chain to develop innovative, more sustainable composite materials and solutions that perform as well as or better than traditional materials. ■ Working closely with local government agencies to demonstrate the sustainability benefits of composite materials in infrastructure projects. 2030 GOALS SUSTAINABLE GROWTH Photo submitted by: Yannick Fovet | San Vincente, Spain Explaining the 5S process at the San Vincente plant. Pictured: Yannick Fovet, Jaume Trullas, Bilal El Hamdouni and Tania Gil

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 113 ■ Partnering and collaborating with builders, contractors, architects, and homeowners to understand their needs and help them leverage leading-edge building science to adapt to better building products and systems. ■ Using science and technology to develop innovative building products and systems to improve durability and deliver energy efficiency and building comfort. ■ Sharing our building science expertise to educate the industry and advocate for building code improvements and green building standards. ■ Continuing to make our employees’ safety, health, and wellness a top priority. Advanced Manufacturing and Productivity Our focus on capital efficiency enables us to achieve a better return on our investment overall. In addition, the Owens Corning advanced manufacturing team looks for ways to use all resources as efficiently as possible, helping us achieve the most possible output with the least possible input. This work is supported by our digital transformation efforts in manufacturing. We apply advanced process controls to increase predictability in our manufacturing processes, which leads to better products and helps us use materials more effectively, reducing cost and our footprint. As an additional benefit of our increased efficiency, our operations are more stable overall. This has the potential to contribute to safety within our facilities, as employees are less likely to be in unplanned or unexpected situations. All told, improving productivity through advanced manufacturing enables growth that aligns with our aspiration to be a net-positive company. Promotion and Advocacy Owens Corning’s advocacy objectives include support for initiatives that align with our core values, especially as they relate to energy efficiency measures and contemporary building code development and adoption. Our efforts to promote our products take many forms, including education campaigns, code advocacy, attention to legislation and regulation related to wildfires, work with the insurance industry, and more. As an example, over the past few years, attention has turned to the codes and standards that apply to the fire performance of products and wall systems. In response to wildfires on the west coast of the U.S., as well as fires in the U.K., Europe, and the Middle East, we expect to see municipalities and possibly even state governments adopt code requirements that drive the market toward non-combustible materials such as Thermafiber ® mineral wool insulation. In addition, expansion of zero-energy code policies in places like California would call for increased R-value per inch, and this could further drive the market toward Thermafiber ® insulation and our other higher R-value insulation products. We also engage with policy makers, with our government affairs team overseeing our interactions and ensuring that our activities are aligned with our climate policy. We regularly review language and activities with both the external affairs and sustainability departments and conduct legal reviews of all external communications including letters, testimony, and activities with outside advocates or NGOs. Owens Corning’s political advocacy objectives are to support initiatives that align with the company’s core values, namely advocating for energy efficiency measures, and for contemporary building code development and adoption. Partnerships with Industry Organizations Our collaborations with the organizations active in our industry provide us with invaluable insights as we seek to improve our sustainability capabilities, and they offer opportunities to collectively advocate for our industry, which in turn promotes growth. Owens Corning employees work with trade associations and research institutions, as well as the organizations that set codes and specifications for the buildings and products that use our materials. Our experts often participate as board and committee members in these organizations, providing leadership that incorporates our strong sustainability standards. The North American Insulation Manufacturers Association (NAIMA) is made up of companies that manufacture fiberglass, rock wool, and slag wool insulation. Its members produce the majority of the insulation products used in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. NAIMA is primarily focused on promoting energy efficiency and the preservation of the environment, as well as the safe production and use of its members’ products. Owens Corning is also a member of the European Insulation Manufacturers Association (EURIMA), which represents the interests of all major mineral wool producers throughout Europe. Owens Corning employees hold leadership positions in the Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association (ARMA), which represents both manufacturers and the companies that supply their raw materials. ARMA is dedicated to the advancement of the asphalt roofing industry through the collective expertise of its member companies, and the organization is also a resource for building and code officials, as well as regulatory agencies and allied trade groups. Our employees have leadership positions with this organization, including chairing the Asphalt Roofing Recycling Committee and Codes Steering Group. Our employees are also active in the Asphalt Institute and Asphalt Institute Foundation and have leadership

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 114 Photo submitted by: Valentin Richard | l’Ardoise, France Removal of the foam cardboard layers increased safety for the operator and provided an opportunity for a more sustainable solution for our customers. positions on both the Asphalt Recycling Task Force and the Asphalt Institute Roofing Technical Committee. Through their work, we are helping drive multiple sustainable approaches within the roofing industry. The American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA) provides education, advocacy, and representation for its member companies and associated markets, working to promote growth within the composites industry. ACMA is committed to driving industry innovation, providing members with a range of educational tools and certification programs. We are active members of these associations, and over the years our employees have served on boards and various committees. For a full list of the organizations we work with, see Appendix D . Certified Energy Experts Owens Corning’s Certified Energy Expert ® (CEE) program was launched in 2012. To become a Certified Energy Expert, contractors must complete Owens Corning training on thermal performance, moisture prevention, air filtration, ventilation, and energy efficiency audits. CEE members have an advanced understanding of building science and have steadily grown sales of Owens Corning insulation. The expertise CEE members offer their customers makes them trusted partners throughout the building process, helping facilitate the construction of more sustainable buildings. Owens Corning supports the contractors with local marketing materials that promote both the Owens Corning brand and the contractor’s, a visible sign of the importance of this collaboration. We have also extended our limited lifetime warranty to include our CEEs’ workmanship in addition to our products. In 2021, program engagement rose — 87% of the members worked with Owens Corning on at least one project during the year. There are currently 100 insulation contractors in this elite group. To remain in the CEE program, the contractors must maintain an above-market sales growth and Owens Corning market share of more than 60%. Members of the program operate with different business models and install different types of insulation, including new construction and renovation of single-family homes and light commercial buildings such as multifamily units. Measuring and disclosing the sustainability impacts of our products not only advances our sustainability goals — it also helps our customers advance theirs. Our sustainability and product stewardship teams work closely with product development and customer support teams to answer questions, test products, and drive transparency. We also help customers improve and promote the sustainability of their products by providing life cycle inventory data for our products. As our customers use these products to manufacture their finished goods, they have access to information that can help them develop more precise LCAs and EPDs. Read more about this work in the Product Innovation & Stewardship chapter . SUPPORTING OUR CUSTOMERS’ SUSTAINABILITY EFFORTS

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 115 Owens Corning’s Sustainability Materiality Assessment emphasizes the importance of sustainable growth as part of our overall growth strategy and prosperity. The initiatives outlined here demonstrate the progress we’ve made to ensure that sustainability remains an integral part of our success. Owens Corning Inaugural Green Bond In 2019, Owens Corning issued its inaugural green bond, which was the first to be offered by an industrial company in the United States. The $450 million bond is payable over ten years at a coupon rate of 3.95%. In conjunction with the bond, the company committed to spending $445 million on eligible green projects. Green bonds represent a small but fast-growing segment of the overall bond market as investors increasingly value corporate sustainability and responsibility. A green bond is a fixed income debt instrument with characteristics similar to a traditional bond, but with a green bond, the issuer promises to use the proceeds to finance or refinance new or existing sustainable projects. The Green Bond Principles are voluntary guidelines established in 2014 and overseen by the International Capital Markets Association. Along with committing to use funds specifically for eligible projects, the issuer pledges to report on how it spends the allocated funds and the progress it makes on the initiatives outlined in connection with the bond. Owens Corning’s report on this inaugural green bond is available on the company’s website. Net Zero Energy-Ready Buildings Our products also play an important role in the development of net zero energy (NZE) buildings. An NZE building is one that produces the same amount of energy as it consumes. Buildings can be designed to be ultra- SUSTAINABLE GROWTH INITIATIVES efficient, making them NZE-ready. Then, when combined with the use of renewable energy, they can achieve net-zero energy status. While we have not set a specific target for NZE buildings as part of our 2030 goals, we work closely with organizations and contractors who are driving progress in this area. For example, we partner with Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) on several demonstration projects to help the building construction industry move toward net zero-ready performance, which will be mandated for all new buildings in 2030 as part of the Pan- Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Owens Corning is in the midst of a two-year project with NRCan in Quebec to demonstrate and educate the building construction industry on building affordable net zero-ready homes in a large-scale setting. We are also working with NRCan on the prefabricated exterior energy retrofit (PEER) group project, which develops insulation systems and technologies for deep energy retrofits to get existing buildings in Canada up to net zero- ready performance. The Building Science Solution Center Owens Corning’s experts continually research and deploy building science to serve architects, buildings, occupants, and the environment. The Owens Corning Building Science Solution Center is a 24/7 portal connecting architects to emerging research, best practices, and thought leadership across a spectrum of building disciplines. In addition to delivering expertise related to sustainability, the Building Science Solution Center offers practical insights into the diverse challenges architects experience and provides access to certification documentation to meet green building program requirements. The portal’s resources include content drawing on more than 40 years of experience pioneering perimeter fire containment assemblies, as well as information designed to help architects predict moisture and thermal performance across a range of climates using WUFI ® analysis. Building science is promoted within the company through an internal team that engages industry partners, architects, engineers, and builders. Through lunch-and-learns, webinars, in-person and virtual seminars, workshops, and trade shows, our team helps drive the use of Owens Corning’s energy- saving products in more green building applications, maximizing their performance and helping them achieve green certifications such as LEED ® . Highly sustainable and energy-efficient solutions continue to be a focus for product and system innovation through collaboration. Cradle-to-grave evaluation of embodied carbon impact will now be at the center of that innovation. Our focus on successfully engaging high-impact architects, engineers, and construction customers around builders is crucial — it can have a ripple effect on sustainable revenue as they spread practices and specifications that bring awareness of Owens Corning ® products to a broader network. For example, if a major architectural firm begins to specify an Owens Corning ® insulation product, that approach may be shared with satellite locations as well, and the impact of the engagement will be magnified. Metrics tracking customers’ building science engagement include monitoring the number of people reached and events held. In 2021, Owens Corning held 267 building science engagement events and reached over 7,200 architects, engineers, and builders. As COVID-19 restrictions begin to be eased, we are hopeful that we can increase our numbers to pre-pandemic levels. Fuel cell buses used throughout the Olympic Village at this year’s games in Tokyo featured Owens Corning chopped strand mat in the air conditioner housings — one more way we’re supporting more sustainable transportation.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 116 SPEAKING OF SUSTAINABILITY In her seven years with Owens Corning, Lindsay Eybs has seen sustainability become an increasingly important priority among our customers. As a strategy leader for our Roofing business, Lindsay is helping to develop the business’s strategic direction and long-range plan, and sustainable growth is very much at the center of that planning. She has many insights into the importance of integrating sustainability into our overall business goals, as well as the importance of bringing different perspectives together to achieve our company’s shared vision. Photo courtesy of Lindsay Eybs On helping customers connect growth and sustainability One of the biggest challenges is continuing to meet the needs of customers, maintaining or the same or better per product performance, while understanding how we can positively impact the environment in meaningful ways. Another challenge is education. Many are familiar with what it takes to achieve financial success, and learning more about how sustainability fits into our business models will help. But the other side of this is educating others on the importance of growing sustainably. If we want to continue leadership in this area, educating customers and other key stakeholders so we’re all growing together will help us to identify some well-defined solutions. And then finally, we must establish a connection to sustainable growth goals. If everyone sees the value in financial success inclusive of sustainability, I believe the passion and commitment of our people will ensure success. On the value of collaboration throughout the organization Working cross-functionally with other groups at Owens Corning is incredibly important to achieving our various goals, whether that’s working with our science and technology team, our sustainability team, or our finance and pricing teams. I often sa y that I can hardly do anything completely on my own within my role at Owens Corning. And I love that, because I think it truly does take a team. I also think that by working together, we push each other to be better and do better because we come up with different ideas. This helps us to push us a little bit further into what we need to be doing. And I think working together truly helps us to achieve our goals in a better and faster way. On the importance of sustainable growth goals Having a goal provides clear direction. It holds us accountable and helps us plan for the future. What I also like about having a sustainable growth goal is that it’s iterative. The ways in which we will achieve it will grow and change, which means that we need to be adaptable. And that’s exciting to me because it doesn’t allow us to be stagnant and definitely drives us to do better in the future. Sustainability isn’t a fad — it’s our future, and I think this helps us to see ourselves in how we’re contributing to those goals. Sustainability isn’t a fad — it’s our future. ” “ Lindsay Eybs Strategy Lead

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 117 SUSTAINABLE GROWTH PERFORMANCE As mentioned above, one way Owens Corning gauges our performance toward our sustainable growth goals is the extent to which we are addressing the trends that are shaping our industry. As we look to the future, we are also cognizant of these trends as significant opportunities to grow while at the same time meeting our 2030 sustainability goals. Several of these trends represent opportunities for sustainable growth over the next decade. Increased premium on living spaces The global pandemic has changed how we think about our homes, both in terms of functionality and comfort. This new emphasis on living spaces will continue to drive investments in new residential housing and renovation in the U.S. and abroad. Insulation is one of the best ways to improve energy efficiency and indoor comfort, including sound reduction. Changing construction practices Even before the pandemic, we saw how labor shortages were impacting construction practices and cycles. Since early 2020, the trend has accelerated, creating the need for multi-material and prefabricated construction solutions that can drive efficiencies. Owens Corning PINK Next Gen™ Fiberglas™ enables 23% faster installation. Fiberglas™ rebar, which is seven times lighter than steel, improves ease of handling for 50% faster installation. Demand for sustainable solutions Reduction of greenhouse gases, improvements in energy efficiency, and the development of more renewable energy sources are increasingly prioritized by homeowners. Governments at all levels are also requiring increasingly stringent standards. Both factors are driving specifications throughout the industry. For example, the European Green Deal Commission proposed that by 2030, all new buildings in the European Union be zero-emission, and Owens Corning products could be part of meeting that goal. Investment in infrastructure We expect to see upgrades to roads and bridges to continue around the world over the next decade. We expect that this investment will also prioritize more durable solutions, which will help ensure that investments will be more sustainable over time. We will capitalize on these opportunities by focusing on our unique combination of materials science knowledge, commercial strength, and manufacturing expertise to develop and commercialize additional product and system solutions. Many of the products discussed in the next section of this chapter will help us address these trends. Photo submitted by: Kelly Picking | Toledo, Ohio, U.S. A view of the High Level Bridge from Middlegrounds Metropark, Toledo, Ohio.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 118 Products That Expand Our Handprint The products Owens Corning manufactures are engineered to help users achieve their own sustainability goals while improving the quality of life for the people who use them. Our insulation products improve the safety and energy efficiency in homes, skyscrapers, and factories around the world. Our shingles and roofing products provide durable solutions that protect structures from the elements. And through our fiberglass reinforcements, used in composite materials, we help make tens of thousands of products lighter, stronger, and more durable. Across all three of our businesses, we offer an extensive portfolio of products that can help our customers save energy and lower emissions. In 2021, 63% of our revenue came from this category of products, which includes: ■ Fiberglass Insulation Fiberglass insulation is the most widely used type of insulation in the United States, Canada, and Mexico today, and Owens Corning’s iconic PINK ® insulation is available in a variety of product lines to serve this market. According to NAIMA, a typical unit of residential insulation saves 12 times as much energy in its first year in place as the energy used to produce it. That means the energy consumed during manufacturing is saved during the first four to five weeks of product use. The insulation continues to save that amount of energy every month throughout the life of the home or building in which it is installed. Other Owens Corning ® fiberglass insulation products provide energy-saving thermal protection for HVAC, mechanical, industrial, and commercial applications. Using recycled glass in the production of fiberglass insulation also lowers the embodied carbon of the product. See the Circular Economy chapter for more details. ■ FOAMGLAS ® Cellular Glass FOAMGLAS ® cellular glass is a high-performance insulation, offering water and fire resistance, high compressive strength, and long-lasting thermal protection in commercial and industrial systems. The product includes post-industrial recycled glass, which in addition to diverting waste from landfills, allows us to minimize our energy consumption and optimize manufacturing efficiency. In 2021, our FOAMGLAS ® hydrocarbon fire protection and corrosion under insulation (CUI) system was expanded to include industrial applications, affording commercial customers increased protection against fire and corrosion under insulation. ■ FOAMGLAS ® Compact Roof It is estimated that by 2050, nearly 70% of the world’s population will live in cities. As society becomes increasingly urbanized, the need to provide livable spaces for people will continue to grow. This need can be addressed through the utilization of flat roof spaces. By adding rooftop gardens to urban structures, we can help increase biodiversity, reduce energy use, and mitigate the impacts of climate change. FOAMGLAS ® Compact Roof helps address this trend. It consists of three layers: a bearing substrate, FOAMGLAS ® cellular glass for thermal insulation, and the waterproofing layer(s). This compact roof build-up can withstand high compressive loads and is resistant to deformation. ■ Extruded Polystyrene (XPS) Insulation Our FOAMULAR ® extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation, a rigid board, is used on exterior and interior walls, foundations, roofs, and infrastructure for thermal insulation, and is uniquely suited for wet conditions. In addition, the product has a proven history of removal, salvage, and reuse. The XPS insulation produced in our facilities in North America and Mexico is made with at least 20% recycled content. ■ FOAMULAR ® NGX™ The proprietary blowing agent in this new line of extruded polystyrene (XPS) foam products is optimized to demonstrate a greater than 80% reduction in embodied carbon, compared to legacy FOAMULAR ® insulation products. It offers these benefits without any decrease in performance for customers, and it meets and exceeds the stringent regulations going into effect in 2021 and 2022. This innovation reflects Owens Corning’s commitment to offering building materials that merge the highest levels of performance and sustainability.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 119 ■ Mineral Wool Insulation Our mineral wool insulation is used in commercial and residential buildings and can also deliver fire containment with its high-temperature durability. In particular, Thermafiber ® mineral wool resists fire and temperatures up to 1,200 ̊ F while also providing sound control and energy conservation, and it contains a minimum of 70% recycled content. PAROC ® stone wool insulation offers very low thermal conductivity, and it maintains its performance and dimensions over the life of the building. In addition, for each metric ton of CO 2 e generated in the manufacturing process, nearly 200 metric tons of CO 2 e are saved over a 50-year period, thanks to its excellent thermal insulation properties. Our PAROC ® Natura line of stone wool insulation uses low-carbon melting technology, green electricity, recycled waste materials, and new technologies to reduce the amount of virgin raw material used and offer a product with very low CO 2 e emissions. The remaining emissions are compensated by reducing CO 2 e emissions through the purchase of offsets in a Verified Emissions Reduction Scheme. This certified carbon-neutral product offers fire-safe, moisture-proof, durable insulation for the building industry. PAROC ® Ultra stone wool insulation, launched in 2021 in Europe’s Baltic region, offers an energy-efficient solution for partitions in new and renovated buildings. It delivers excellent performance in humidity, cold, and in circumstances where temperatures fluctuate greatly during the day. Its stone wool slabs are also easy to install, addressing the changing nature of construction practices around the world, and slabs are compressed by as much as 60% to cut down on transportation and warehousing costs. PAROC ® Ultra is also highly durable and is engineered to last the life of the building. ■ Cool Roof Shingles Our wide color range of “cool roof” shingles uses a highly reflective granule technology that bounces back the sun’s rays, helping keep roofs cooler to reduce air conditioning energy levels. ■ Composites Glass-reinforced composites can be light, insulating, and resistant to corrosion, impact, and heat. They are used to replace steel, aluminum, wood, and other materials. Fiberglass as a reinforcement provides for lighter weight while delivering comparable or better strength than other materials such as steel. Lighter weight means more fuel efficiency in all forms of transportation. One area where we are contributing to lighter vehicles is in the development of battery covers for electric vehicles, which adds another layer of sustainability to our efforts. In 2021, Owens Corning began supplying our Pipestrand S 2300 glass roving for the first hydrogen-powered commercial vehicle. The filament winding application process has been known for decades, but the application of hydrogen tanks for the automotive industry is rather new and strategic for the transition to cleaner automobile motorization. Each hydrogen tank contains about 2 kg of glass fiber, which constitutes the last layers of the winding, and provides protection for the inner carbon layers. With increasingly higher-strength technology, composites have also provided more efficiency and greater economy for wind energy turbines using longer, lighter, and more productive blades, including those designed for lower wind speeds and emerging off-shore installations. Photo submitted by: Jan-Christian Stenroos | Parainen, Finland Mineral wool on the line at the Parainen plant. In May 2021, the National Association of Manufacturers awarded Owens Corning the Manufacturing Leadership Award for innovation that supports environmental sustainability. FOAMULAR ® NGX™ extruded polystyrene insulation also earned High Achiever recognition for the highest score in the Sustainability Leadership category.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 120 Sustainable Infrastructure ■ Products from Our Coated Wovens Business These include geosynthetic membranes to provide superior solutions for water management, agriculture, and the protection of high value raw materials. Our roofing underlayment contains a minimum of 20% recycled content. ■ Liner for Cured-in-Place Pipe (CIPP) Repairing sewer lines has traditionally involved digging up roadways, leading to traffic jams, noise, dust, and other disturbances. The CIPP installation process inserts a flexible thermoset resin liner into the damaged pipe, where is then expanded using air pressure and cured using UV light. CIPP delivers numerous advantages in terms of sustainability. By reducing the number of vehicles required to complete a repair and avoiding months of stopped traffic on the roadways, CIPP reduces the amount of CO 2 emitted over the course of repairs. This optimization of the process also saves time and labor while also reducing the risk of damage and accidents. We supply the thermoset resin manufactures with specially designed continuous filament glass that enables the installation and performance of the liner systems. The market for CIPP continues to grow around the world, especially in the U.S., Asia Pacific, and Europe. Looking ahead, we expect this market to continue to expand as investments in infrastructure continue to grow. ■ Corrosion-Resistant Rebar The American Society of Structural Engineers estimates that one in nine bridges in the U.S. is structurally deficient. In many cases, bridge failure is caused by corrosion of the steel rebar used in the supports and surface, and many states are looking at significant infrastructure projects to repair or replace these bridges. These projects are often disruptive and costly. In this context, longer-lasting bridges are better for the environment — and for the people who use and maintain them. Owens Corning’s fiberglass rebar offers a sustainable solution. The advantages of Owens Corning’s fiberglass rebar over traditional steel rebar are numerous — it lasts longer, it’s up to four times lighter, and it resists corrosion. We’ve worked with the U.S. Department of Transportation and several state agencies on specific bridge projects to demonstrate the benefits. Composite rebar is also beneficial in situations where concrete is manufactured using salt water, as it resists corrosion. By using salt water, manufacturers are able to preserve the amount of quality fresh water available for human consumption. ■ FOAMULAR ® EdgeLock™ Insulation This product is designed to insulate roads in areas where permafrost is vulnerable to melting, which is a practical factor in infrastructure in these regions. The unique design of EdgeLock™ insulation allows installers to use one layer of insulation without sacrificing the thermal performance typically achieved through two layers of insulation. This results in faster installation, reducing labor hours as well as carbon emissions from equipment, helping protect a sensitive ecosystem. ■ Composite Utility Poles and Cross-Arms We are working with several pole customers globally to develop utility transmission and communication poles. These glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) poles offer reliability and resilience in high-load situations such as ice storms and high winds. They last longer than wooden poles, and they resist fire, wind, and other potential damage. And unlike chemically treated wood poles, which can leach chemicals into the soil, GFRP composite materials are considered inert, minimizing adverse impact to the environment where they are installed. In addition, composite poles can weigh up to 80% less than timber and steel poles, making them lighter to transport and safer to install.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Sustainable Growth | 121 GOING FORWARD In the coming years, Owens Corning expects that the importance of balancing growth with sustainability will become increasingly evident. We will be there to meet the demand for products that deliver performance while minimizing negative impacts. In particular, we recognize the growing demand for reduced embodied carbon, which is already shaping our approach to innovation throughout our operations. Among the other specific areas of focus Owens Corning has prioritized for the immediate future is the need to expand the number of products that are free of formaldehyde and fluorocarbons. Our people are also monitoring other trends that will shape our economy, and we are working with customers to anticipate their needs. We believe this will lead to sustainable growth for the company, our customers, our suppliers, and our investors, and through these efforts, we will continue to be a vibrant company that helps make the world a better place. Photo submitted by: Leila Pourzahedi | Granville, Ohio, U.S. Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

      2021 Owens Corning Sustainability Report | Expanding Our Product Handprint | Supply Chain Sustainability | 122 SUPPLY CHAIN SUSTAINABILITY In this chapter: ƒ 2030 GOALS ƒ OUR APPROACH ƒ INITIATIVES ƒ PERFORMANCE ƒ GOING FORWARD When it comes to achieving our sustainability goals, collaboration is essential — both internally among our people and externally with the companies that contribute to our value chain. That’s why we developed our Supplier Code of Conduct, an essential document in our approach to supply chain sustainability. Owens Corning is committed to working with suppliers that share our beliefs across all three of our sustainability pillars. We expect our suppliers to be dedicated to reducing their environmental footprint, and we measure their greenhouse gas emissions as part of our overall approach to combating climate change. We also work with them as they seek to contribute to the circular economy model and increase their product handprint. By encouraging suppliers to develop standards related to human rights initiatives, we are helping them increase their social handprint as well. Our supply chain sustainability efforts align with the following UN SDGs: Sustainability Materiality Definition: We strive to hold our suppliers to the same high standards we hold ourselves. We see our suppliers as a key contributor to our overall sustainability vision and seek to ensure all our suppliers fully comply with all applicable legislation, regulations, and legal requirements on human rights, labor, the environment, anti-corruption, and trade